It looks like my tank has become uninhabitable. - Page 3 - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
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post #21 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-29-2013, 10:47 PM
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Inverts are extremely sensitive to ammonia and nitrites...anything over 0 can be lethal.
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post #22 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-29-2013, 11:09 PM Thread Starter
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Inverts are extremely sensitive to ammonia and nitrites...anything over 0 can be lethal.
I'm still trying to figure out the best method here...Do I attempt to breed the female or just scratch that thought all together, even tho I have made the water a happy place to live again. So you think the other guppy died because if the nitrate levels?
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post #23 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 06:19 AM
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Rotten egg smell in water is usually the smell of sulfur. It's very toxic to fish. You can buy filters for sulfuric water but they can be pricey. At this point the distilled water is going to be a million times better than refilling the tank with sulfur water. If you can, try buying a rain barrel and doing water changes with rainwater.

Whitish colored ghost shrimp are either sick (infection) or about to shed their skins. Dead shrimp are pink. Sometimes you may see bits and pieces of white or clear shrimp skins lying around after they shed. They usually eat the skins right after a shed, but sometimes they can be mistaken for dead shrimp.

Shrimp jumping out of a tank usually only occurs when they get startled or chased by a fish. If you have a fish in the tank that likes to chase the shrimp, they may be jumping to escape and end up on the glass. It happens very often here at the fish store when we are feeding the fish in the shallower display tanks.

Another possible reason they are jumping out is poor water quality. I would invest in a liquid test kit. Don't get the strips as they are unreliable. You can take a sample of your water to a pet store to get tested, but they'll use the strips which won't give you an accurate result.
Because of the sulfur your water may be super low ph. Ghost shrimp prefer a neutral ph usually.
You may also have a copper content in your water which is toxic to invertebrates, but one of the above problems is more likely.

The only real way to find out what is going on is to buy a water test kit and have your water tested. Sometimes you can take a water sample to your local water authority and have it tested for sulfur, copper, magnesium, and related things for free. You also want to test your water for ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate.

I don't suggest changing filter pads entirely all at once. You should rinse out the filter pad once a week or so with tank water, and then put it back. You can replace the filter every 6 months to one year, but you should add the new filter pad in and leave it in for at least a week and a half before removing the old pad, to give the cycle bacterias time to pollinate the new pad. Ideally, you should have a packet of biomedia, activated charcoal, and a filter pad all at once. The biomedia will host the majority of your bacteria (ceramic balls are often used), the activated charcoal will absorb heavy metals, excess acids, and tannins from the water, and the pad will trap the larger bits of debris.
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post #24 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 06:26 AM
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I'm still trying to figure out the best method here...Do I attempt to breed the female or just scratch that thought all together, even tho I have made the water a happy place to live again. So you think the other guppy died because if the nitrate levels?
Nitrate is uncomfortable at high levels, but not usually lethal. Ammonia/ammonium is lethal, and nitrite can be even more toxic in hard waters.

If the ammonia is high (anything over 0 is high. .25 is damaging to fish gills, and lethal to many invertebrates) you need to get that fixed before the female will have a successful brood. Since ghost shrimp is a catch-all term for many clear shrimp, you may or may not have a freshwater breeding species. Some people cannot breed their ghost shrimp because some of the species that fall in that category need brackish water for the shrimp to survive.

If you have a freshwater breeding female and a freshwater breeding male, the next time the female sheds her skin she'll bring out her eggs and the male will fertilize. But if the ammonia is over 0, the larva will generally not survive.

Breeding freshwater ghost shrimp is really easy, just have clean water and food and they'll go at it, no work involved for you. At this point, if you want to breed, you'll need to figure out why your ammonia is over 0, and fix it, then they'll begin breeding usually.
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post #25 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 07:20 AM Thread Starter
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looks like I spoke to soon. After I got home from the pet store, I changed 25% of the water and added an ammonia neutralizer and after a couple of hours I went to work. I got back home an hour ago and Betta #2 is dead and at this point if the guppies and last remaining shrimp live more then a week I will be surprised. There is no fog/sludge in my tank, and other then the water results idk why it's acting like this. Apparently I own a demonic fish tank. I was going to get another fish next week but looks like that's a nogo.
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post #26 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 07:31 AM
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I'd definately set aside fish tanks for now until you can get to the source of the problem. Sulfur in water tends to be clear and may even stop offgassing after a little while but it's still present. From what I gather you have sulfuric water and that'll kill off everything pretty quick, especially paired with ammonia over 0.
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post #27 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 07:37 AM Thread Starter
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well the thing is I don't dare or have I ever used my tap water to put in my fish tank. It has either been distilled water from a plastic jug, or spring water from a jug, or mineral water from a jug. sigh sorry I'm just disappointed in why this is happening. Things do not die without a cause
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post #28 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 08:10 PM
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Did you ever get something to remineralize the water as suggested earlier? Straight distilled, spring and mineral water do not have what the fish need. Just a thought.

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post #29 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 10:33 PM Thread Starter
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Did you ever get something to remineralize the water as suggested earlier? Straight distilled, spring and mineral water do not have what the fish need. Just a thought.
When I change a tank these are the steps I do: Empty all but 1gal (25% of my 5g tank) using an old water jug. After dumping that water down my sink I wash out my old water jug OR throw it away (since I now live in my new apartment ive had to throw jugs away constantly). I then use the water in the remaining jugs and pour it in the tank since it is already room temperature. As I am adding the water I put in Betta Safe conditioner. 5-6 drops per 10 gal. I then let the shrimp clean up the remaining particles (sometimes they do/sometimes not).
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post #30 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-30-2013, 10:44 PM
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The Betta Safe detoxifies ammonia; it does not remineralize the water. Check my earlier post for the Seachem link.

As stated earlier, shrimp cannot take such drastic water changes. Twenty percent is plenty.

To warm the water, set it in a sink of hot water and check temp until it matches that in the aquarium.

Add Betta Safe before you put water in aquarium.

Invest in a liquid test kit if you haven't already. Your tank is probably cycling so make those 20% water changes twice a week.

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