Anyone here have Sugar Gliders? - Page 3 - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
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post #21 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-27-2011, 10:39 PM
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Poison kills you by being ingested, venom goes through your blood!

A poisonous snake means you'd die if you ate him, but wouldn't hurt if he bit you! If a venomous snake bites--watch out! A common mistake, but they are very different! So your meal could be poison, but not a snake :D The more you know~

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post #22 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-27-2011, 10:58 PM
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I always love how we are portrayed overseas as being a 'dangerous' country wildlife wise, when I think Americans probably have more deaths/injuries due to attacks by deer, elk, cougars, bears etc. than we have from snakes, sharks and spiders.

Kangaroos and cassowaries are probably the only ones that will attack humans. Some of those big male roos are very intimidating, and will drown dogs and break bones if they are provoked.

I am always running into snakes as my relatives own a lot of country properties. I usually run screaming in the opposite direction so it has to be a fast snake that can bite me.

I always hate seeing sugar gliders as pets. They are essentially a wild animal that sleeps during the day and comes out at night. I much prefer seeing them and other natives here in their natural habitat. We had two massive ones living up at our school camp. They were like the size of large cats and always brawling in the roof.


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post #23 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-28-2011, 04:52 AM
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We've got at least 9 of the top 10, and we do pretty well in terms of spiders, too. And sea creatures. Lesson the first: don't swim in Australia. If you do, make sure you are insured.

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post #24 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 10:39 AM
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I've seen shows on Animal Planet about people getting killed by animals in Australia. I saw one show about a saltwater crocodile attacking some campers in the middle of the night and I saw one where a guy was eaten by a great white shark.
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post #25 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 05:45 PM
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To be fair, crocodile deaths usually happen because tourists go camping in areas that are known (and signposted) as being full of crocodiles. That's never a good plan. And as for sharks, well, it is their ocean, and mostly they bite out of curiosity. Trouble is, their curious bites can easil be fatal.

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post #26 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 06:09 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LittleBettaFish View Post
I always hate seeing sugar gliders as pets. They are essentially a wild animal that sleeps during the day and comes out at night. I much prefer seeing them and other natives here in their natural habitat. We had two massive ones living up at our school camp. They were like the size of large cats and always brawling in the roof.
They are bred for captivity, you know? I'm not taking some from the wild! I feel like you said that blindly, and feel a little hurt. That's like saying our pet cats should be wild, or our dogs should be wild... just because some are (or "feral" in a better term) doesn't mean they should all be released.

The cage is huge, and it's mainly for sleeping and a few hours at night. I'm "nocturnal" as well. So while they are awake, they will be out playing, gliding, and being curious little creatures in a safe environment. No pellet food, but a very balanced live/fruit/veggie diet. Most days they will actually be with me in a bonding pouch, cuddled up and sleeping. They'll also get plenty of outside time, again, in a safe environment. It's not like I'm keeping them in a rabbit cage with some pellet food and they're never out.

I don't view Australia as "deadly", I just think there are some pretty freaky animals! I know (and have friends) in Australia, and they're always fine. But still... crazy creatures!

Kaida- CT Female 2.5 Gal.
Julep- HMPK Male 2.5 Gal.
Fandango-HM Male 10 Gal.
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post #27 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 06:15 PM
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So true. Same can be said for a lot of deaths with animals. We go into their territory--and worse, mess with the wild animals. Most rattlesnake deaths happen because someone was trying to kill or move the rattlesnake without proper knowledge. Another interesting tidbit, is a LOT of rattlesnake bites often happen while the person is drunk. Too much alchohol+messing with a snake that is horrified of you who has a venomous bite=Not a good idea, ever! Back away, leave, and if the snake is in a place where it could be injured or could injure someone else, call someone experienced in handling the animals. It's ridiculous to see someone who is deep in the wild, miles away from most civilization who decides to kill wildlife in the name of public safety--Just puts THEIR safety at risk!


My favorite story of this--a family walking in a wildlife preserve comes across a rattlesnake(who is not even on the path, but in the bushes off several feet from them)... The father takes a stick and tries to flip the snake in the air multiple times--I suppose to make it go away even farther than it was. Well. He ended up TOSSING the snake onto his 7 year old daughter's back, where the snake of course bites her in pure horror(imagine being tossed dozens of feet in the air by giant monsters) Anyway, they kill the snake, take the daughter to the hospital(thank goodness she was okay after her father nearly got her killed)

And then the family decided to sue the WILDLIFE PRESERVE until they removed all animals that could be dangerous.

There were even signs warning this was home to several rattlesnakes. We're barging right into their house and kicking them out. I still can't believe that guy. Talk about endangering their child.


And of course not to mention people who feed crocodiles and sharks because it's cool--which only makes them think humans=source of food. Now when the humans don't have a chunk of meat to feed them, they just take a bite directly from the source!
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post #28 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 06:37 PM Thread Starter
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So true. Same can be said for a lot of deaths with animals. We go into their territory--and worse, mess with the wild animals. Most rattlesnake deaths happen because someone was trying to kill or move the rattlesnake without proper knowledge. Another interesting tidbit, is a LOT of rattlesnake bites often happen while the person is drunk. Too much alchohol+messing with a snake that is horrified of you who has a venomous bite=Not a good idea, ever! Back away, leave, and if the snake is in a place where it could be injured or could injure someone else, call someone experienced in handling the animals. It's ridiculous to see someone who is deep in the wild, miles away from most civilization who decides to kill wildlife in the name of public safety--Just puts THEIR safety at risk!


My favorite story of this--a family walking in a wildlife preserve comes across a rattlesnake(who is not even on the path, but in the bushes off several feet from them)... The father takes a stick and tries to flip the snake in the air multiple times--I suppose to make it go away even farther than it was. Well. He ended up TOSSING the snake onto his 7 year old daughter's back, where the snake of course bites her in pure horror(imagine being tossed dozens of feet in the air by giant monsters) Anyway, they kill the snake, take the daughter to the hospital(thank goodness she was okay after her father nearly got her killed)

And then the family decided to sue the WILDLIFE PRESERVE until they removed all animals that could be dangerous.

There were even signs warning this was home to several rattlesnakes. We're barging right into their house and kicking them out. I still can't believe that guy. Talk about endangering their child.


And of course not to mention people who feed crocodiles and sharks because it's cool--which only makes them think humans=source of food. Now when the humans don't have a chunk of meat to feed them, they just take a bite directly from the source!
Oh my gosh! That's horrible! The poor snake... I'm not particularly fond of snakes, but I still think that was ridiculous. I hate doing that to animals.. it is their home, too, definitely!

Kaida- CT Female 2.5 Gal.
Julep- HMPK Male 2.5 Gal.
Fandango-HM Male 10 Gal.
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post #29 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-29-2011, 06:47 PM
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They are bred for captivity, you know? I'm not taking some from the wild! I feel like you said that blindly, and feel a little hurt. That's like saying our pet cats should be wild, or our dogs should be wild... just because some are (or "feral" in a better term) doesn't mean they should all be released.
Not to mention, a single outdoor cat can kill 1000 animals in a year, so releasing them is really out of the question. Honestly, besides humans, cats are the single most destructive invasive species on the planet.


I do agree that there is something to be said for captive bred animals. It is important of course to understand what the animal needs and not to simply buy an exotic because it is cool. However, many captive animals do FAR better in pet homes than in the wild, their lifespans doubling, and in proper homes, their stress level being infinitely lower than those in the wild. Not to mention, domestication is happening, and it is happening incredibly fast compared to the domestication of dogs, as we know enough psychology of animals to determine which animals can be bred to increase tameness.

The silver fox experiment is something to look up. In fifty years, the foxes have become as tame and domestic as dogs, and through simply breeding them for tameness, new colors and fur patterns and sizes have started to show up. It's really like watching dogs be domesticated in the current day. Absolutely incredible.

People who get exotics because they are cool and who give them bad homes often times give their own dogs and cats bad homes as well. I do believe people need more education and should not be able to impulse buy animals with special needs that are not common knowledge. But I have worked with wild and captive bred animals--and even in reptiles, there is an incredible difference. I know my boa would not survive in the wild. She has never been fed live food. She has never had to search for warmth, or learn fear of predators. Compared to a wild boa, she is incredibly docile and patient. She would die within a month, even in her native habitat. But I don't feel I am doing her a disservice by keeping her in my home. In the wild I see boas with incredibly painful scars and infections. Hunted for their meat and skins, they can sometimes barely live long enough to just become someone's new pair of shoes. Not to mention their natural predators, or parasite infestations from feeding on unhealthy prey items. They were built to survive in that environment, and I believe we can replicate what they need to survive. For a reptile, that means you MUST provide them with the exact heat and humidity they would thrive in in the wild. They need to feel safe, that means providing hiding places. They need water. Food. Exercise. Exercise can be done in a home, they don't need to wander an entire jungle--they wouldn't anyway, they pretty much stay in one area. Letting them climb, crawl, explore, stretch, while giving them every aspect of their environment they were built to survive in--and giving them nutritious foods that are healthy and parasite free.. That makes for an incredibly happy reptile :) my snake never has to die until it is her natural time, and until then, she is going to enjoy her life to the fullest! Now... Getting a snake, keeping it warm with a hot rock without monitoring temps, giving it whatever as food, not really researching what they need..That is wrong. That does not make a happy reptile.

If you aren't willing or able to do what it takes and spend the money needed to have a healthy animal--you really should reconsider having that animal. By taking ownership of a living thing, you have the responsibility to give it everything it needs. In the wild, if a lizard gets too hot, it can hide, burrow, swim. Get away from the heat. And possibly survive. In a glass cage..if a lizard gets too hot, and an owner isn't there to intervene..it is trapped..it will die. You will kill an animal that could have lived. Give the lizard the right temps and humidity, you will see it grow, thrive, and display all of it's natural beauty for you to see, and it will live in a reptile paradise. A dog in the wild will hunt for prey, get good nutrition, get all the exercise it needs. In a home, all it can eat is what you give it..feed it good food, or it could really live a far shorter life than it should. Give it the best food you can, feed and exercise it right, play and love the dog and be a proper pack leader..and that dog is living a dream of a life. Or a betta. We all know how they live in the wild. They can die in droughts, or they can survive and get to better waters. And in a betta coffin....We know how that goes. But give it a big, heated tank, feed him right...and see your fish thrive!! :)

There is no room for ignorance when owning a pet. If you don't know--research. If you think you know--research more! "I didn't know it needed ________ to survive!" Is never fun to say, when you realized you accidentally ended your pets life. :(

So tl;dr: Animals can often thrive in captivity. Sometimes they have no choice, there is no wild for them to go to. But you better do your best to do what's right for your pet. You don't want the guilt of their death or suffering to be on your shoulders.



Edit: omg, I am so sorry. Wall of text. ;^; I talk too much.
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post #30 of 30 (permalink) Old 10-30-2011, 03:11 PM Thread Starter
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Purplemuffin- I'm glad you said all of that... that was the point I was trying to get across! These gliders are specifically bred and if released, well, they would die. They don't have the same instincts, knowledge, temperament, etc.. Born in captivity, will stay in captivity. And will live a happy, healthy, better life, in my opinion!

Just like your snakes... Or pet iguanas... That's like taking a captive tiger and releasing it, they wouldn't do well.

And in my opinion, sugar gliders don't fare well in the wild. They are prey, and they are often injured, sick, eaten, killed, etc in the wild... I'd rather see them in GOOD homes being bred as pets than constantly bred/released for the wild.

Again, they will have a replicated life style and given incredible care.. Not stuffed in a cage given a pellet food and used to look at and make friends ooh and ahh. I love these little guys and everything that comes with them!

Kaida- CT Female 2.5 Gal.
Julep- HMPK Male 2.5 Gal.
Fandango-HM Male 10 Gal.
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