Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Care
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-07-2012, 05:59 PM   #1 
LauraWebb
New Member
 
LauraWebb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Melbourne, Australia
PH Level - Rising!

Help! I've setup a new tank and it's styill in it's first days (Fish in cycle).

I have my single Male Betta in there but i'm finding the PH keep rising. I get it down to about 7.2 but by the end of the day it's back up to 7.5-7.6. I know this is not extremely high, but if I wasn't treating it with PH Down, i'm sure it would keep rising!

My other tank has the opposite issue (well established tank) where the PH keeps dropping to about 6.6 and i have to keep using PH Up.

My tap water has a PH of 7.

There is 2 differences in these tanks (besides one being established and one being new).

The established tank has a very low KH, so I expect the PH to not be stable. I am using a KH booster, but not alot as it makes the PH increase rapidly.

In the new tank, I increased the KH immediately (before any fish were in there) to around 120ppm. I did it before my fishy was in there as I knew the PH would skyrocket by increasing thr KH so quickly.

Could the slow PH rising be an after effect of increasing the KH so dramatically... and if so will it settle down?

I am having to add PH down in the morning and at night. Is this bad for my fishy? This means his PH is continually going 7.5-7.2-7.5-7.2-7.5
LauraWebb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:14 PM   #2 
Myates
Member
 
Myates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
It's unstable most likely because you are using chemicals to make it go up and down.. creating fluctuations in your pH is deadly to your betta (and some other fish). Why not just leave it alone? A betta can withstand higher then normal pH.. and at 7, or slightly above is good for them..

Hold off on the chemicals of pH down/up, on all the tanks, wait a few days and see how they fare. The fluctuations is what is going to harm the fish, not the pH itself. The only time you need to worry about pH is when you have specialty fish who are very sensitive to their environment.. most common tropical fish (bettas included) are not picky to the specifics of the pH, but just to the fluctuations.

What water source are you using?
Myates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:18 PM   #3 
LauraWebb
New Member
 
LauraWebb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Melbourne, Australia
The fluctuation in the established tank is due to a 0 KH level, if I let it drop, it will go far below a level of 6.

As my tap water has a natural level of 0 KH and a natural level of 7 Ph, if I dont add any KH the level will drop dramatically like the established tank.

I am using Tap Water.

If I don't add any PH Down, are you saying it would be safe to allow my PH in the new tank to increase over time to more than 7.5? Potentially High 8's?
LauraWebb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:29 PM   #4 
Myates
Member
 
Myates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
A pH of 7.5- low 8s won't cause the betta any harm.. a higher pH, as far as I have seen, hasn't caused any health issues. What I have seen is playing with the pH causing harm. It's very easy to give a little too much of the chemical which can be detrimental to the betta.

The pH may be raising is since you are cycling a tank, are you topping it off, or doing very small water changes frequently? That could cause a jump in the pH.. or any shells/coral in the tank will cause it to go high.

Normally the pH is high when you first put water in, but in time the pH should decrease as the aquarium and its substrate are allowed to age.

One way to safely lower your pH without using chemicals is peat moss in the filter.. it may turn the water a little amber, but if you don't mind it then I would go with it as bettas actually prefer a tannin colored tank.
Indian Almond Leaves also slightly lower the pH, and are very healthy for bettas.

Last edited by Myates; 03-07-2012 at 06:31 PM.
Myates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:35 PM   #5 
Aus
Member
 
Aus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Australia!
Quote:
and at 7, or slightly above is good for them..
I thought softer, slightly acidic water was the ideal for bettas?
Aus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:37 PM   #6 
LauraWebb
New Member
 
LauraWebb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Melbourne, Australia
At the moment i'm doing not doing anything with the cycling as it's a 130ltr tank with only 1 betta and ammonia is still on 0ppm, nitrates and nitrites are both still on 0ppm and it's only day 4. So I have not done any water changes. As for topping it off, do you mean adding more water? Im not sure of that terminology. If so, then no, not yet.

I just felt with such a large tank, that doing water changes with only one fish would be counter productive if the ammonia, nitrates and nitrites are all still on 0ppm.

Im testing all levels twice a day as i've never had to cycle a tank before as my established tank was given to us by someone who had already established it.

I don't have any shells or coral. I only have some silk plants at the moment (the plan is to get 1 or 2 live plants) and 2 ornaments for him to hide in, and a floating leaf for him to sit on near the top of the tank.

I will have a look into Peat Moss - i'm not worried about the colour of the tank if it's not bad for my fishy.
LauraWebb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:37 PM   #7 
Myates
Member
 
Myates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Yes, it's what they prefer.. but it's not feasible if your water resource is naturally higher. It's not safe to play around with it, to cause it to go up and down because it will fluctuate more then just the one time you put it in.. and that can be deadly. Bettas will tolerate all ranges of pH, and will be healthy and fine.. it's when the pH goes up and down drastically/too fast is when it will at some point, cause them to go into shock.
If properly homed in a warm, clean tank.. the betta will have no ill effects from a higher pH.

Ah.. nice large tank for him :) Keep in mind, bettas produce only a little bit of ammonia, but if you have used something from your established tank (like a filter sponge or a rock/gravel) then it will cycle faster.

Hmm.. not adding water in or doing any changes.. I still recommend not using the chemicals for a few days and see if it stabilizes.

Last edited by Myates; 03-07-2012 at 06:40 PM.
Myates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:43 PM   #8 
LauraWebb
New Member
 
LauraWebb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Melbourne, Australia
I haven't used anything from the old tank as I am having fatalities in my old tank (hence the new tank) but without visible cause or water levels being wrong, so I wasn't game to transfer anything from the old tank to the new.

Would adding a plant or two increase the time it takes to cycle? or another fish or two?
LauraWebb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 06:48 PM   #9 
Myates
Member
 
Myates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Plants will help keep everything stable. As for fish, I wouldn't add any more, because as it's trying to cycle, adding in more fish will cause the system to crash and overload on ammonia.

The only thing I would add in, if you wanted, would be a few ghost shrimp, as their bio loads are quite small, but will still help the process.. a lot of people use shrimp to cycle instead of fish.
Myates is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
temperature rising amethystlady Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 5 05-20-2011 06:37 PM
Rising Scales? Fawnleaf Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 21 11-26-2010 01:41 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.