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Old 05-27-2012, 07:20 AM   #1 
Mo
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Correct?

Is this information correct?

Nitrifying Bacteria


Nitrifying bacteria are chemoatotrophic or chomolithotrophs depending on the genera, being nitrosococcus, nitrobacter, nitrococcus, and nitrosomonas, they are bacteria that grow be consuming inorganic compunds, mostly decaying that leave out considerable amount of ammonia, and mainly thrivethhis key source. Many species of nitrifying bacteria have complex membrane systems that are the location for the most important enzymes in the nitrification process. Ammonia monooxygenase which oxidizes ammonia into hydroxylamine, and nitrite oxidoreductase which oxidezes nitrite into nitrates

Nitrifying bacteria mostly thrive on ammonia and compuods that release ammonia, or where high amounts of ammonia are present this source is commonly presnt in lakes and streams with high amounts of waste and sewage, they thrive in area such as these

Needs of Nitrifying bacteria. Temperature

Optimal Growth Temperature to sustain Fast growth Rate should be maintained. The temperature difference can effect how the bacteria grows, colonizes and survives

Needs Of Nitrifying Bacteria. Food Source.

All Living organisms need food to survive grow and thrive. Nitrosifying bacteria such as Nitrosomonas, and Nitrosococcus attain there main source of food from ammonia. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira attain there food from nitrites which is a result of Nitrosomonas, and other types of nitrosifying bacteria oxidizing ammonia which then are converted into Nitrates by the bacteria. Food such as some nitrogen food source should suffice for a colony but free floating ammonia will greatly benefit the bacteria.

needs of nitrifying bacteria. Food source

All Living organisms need food to survive grow and thrive. Nitrosifying bacteria such as Nitrosomonas, and Nitrosococcus attain there main source of food from ammonia. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira attain there food from nitrites which is a result of Nitrosomonas, and other types of nitrosifying bacteria oxidizing ammonia which then are converted into Nitrates by the bacteria. Food such as some nitrogen food source should suffice for a colony but free floating ammonia will greatly benefit the bacteria.

Needs of Nitrifying Bacteria. Oxygen.

Nitrifying bacteria needs oxygen to survive, and thrive. Nitrifying bacteria needs around 3 ppm. parts per million of oxygen to thrive. they attain the oxygen from a number of resources. the soil, air, or the water.

Needs of nitrifying bacteria. Summary

Optimal Growth
A nitrogen food source, ammonia would be best
Temperatue. Tmperatures between 70-85 should be maintained for best growth
Ph. For best growth the Ph should be maintained between 7.2 and 8.0
Dissolved Oxygen. Bacteria need a reasonable supply of oxygen to thrive. ideally 3 parts per million.
•The water must have a KH and a GH of at least 07.2ppm for the bacteria to survive.

Growth suppressors of nitrifying Bacteria.

Light.
Nitrifying bacteria is photosensitive and cannot handle large amounts of light.

Fluctuating or bad temperatures
A Temperature out of the range of the ones listed earlier will kill or decrease the growth of the bacteria. an unstable, constantly changing will do the same

Fluctuating or bad PH
If a Ph is out of range or constantly fluctuating it will have very similar effects as the temperature would. the growth would be either decreased or the bacteria would perish

Growth supressors of Nitrifying Bacteria.....Continued.

Not enough food
As you already know, nitrifying bacteria needs a constant and optimal/sufficient source of food such as free floating ammonia. withouot any source of food the bacteria wouldnt grow, it would die, or if there was a very small almost un noticable amount. the bacteria colony would be very small

not enough oxygen
Since this type of bacteria needs an optimal/sufficient amount of oxygen to thrive and survive around 3 parts per million. without close to that amount the nitrifying bacteria amount of be small and decreased. or the nitrifying bacteria would perish from in-sufficient amounts of oxygen

Why Nitrifying bacteria is important to any eco-system.

Nitrifying bacteria is a vital part to many ecosystems as it is considered a decomposer. since decaying matter, re-leases ammonia naturally and ammonia is considered a main diet or food to nitrifying bacteria. nitrifying bacteria plays a roll in underwater systems as well as our lives. the sewage outputs we provide ensures a proper home for nitrifying bacteria to thrive given that the other requirements are provided

Last edited by Mo; 05-27-2012 at 07:27 AM.
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Old 05-27-2012, 09:52 AM   #2 
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Besides horrible grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and run on sentences it seems okay.
You can say "bacteria is." The singular word is bacterium.
You put the food source section twice.

You say nothing about the bacteria is pH is below 7? Lot's of people encounter that. In acidic waters most NH3 is converted to NH4+. Something to look into.
Temperatures below 70F will -not- kill the bacteria off. How does a koi pond stay cycled through the winter? The bacteria can be slowed down which does drop population but it does correspond to the fish hibernation.

"....they are bacteria that grow be consuming inorganic compunds, mostly decaying that leave out considerable amount of ammonia, and mainly thrivethhis key source. Many species of nitrifying bacteria have complex membrane systems that are the location for the most important enzymes in the nitrification process. Ammonia monooxygenase which oxidizes ammonia into hydroxylamine, and nitrite oxidoreductase which oxidezes nitrite into nitrates"

You seem to be mixing the two types of bacteria together?

First for NH3. The process does not stop at hydroxylamine, NH2OH.
The equation:
NH3 + H2O -> NH2OH
Is impossible to balance.. at least in my opinion. The proper formula would be:
NH3 + O2 + 2H -> NH2OH + H2O
The water is released, the NH2OH moves onto the next process, the hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, another enzyme..
NH2OH + O2 -> NO2 + H2O (going to take a daring and ever so wild stab that that's the formula, lol).

There really isn't much research done into these bacteria species so the data is inconclusive.....
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Old 05-27-2012, 02:27 PM   #3 
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Thank you for the constructive criticism! I appreciate it! I will work on those errors and do more research. Into the subject
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Old 05-27-2012, 02:48 PM   #4 
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I've heard that pH dropping below 7 can ruin a cycle. But people cycle their acidic tanks all the time. It's odd.
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