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Old 05-29-2012, 05:22 PM   #1 
LugiaChan
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Smile Best white sand to use for planted freshwater aquarium?

If this is in the wrong spot, please re-locate it :0


So.... I want to know what's the best most white sand (not gravel type, very very broken down grains) to use in my aquarium with my betta and avoid plant rot or problems? Is there any sand that wont change colors over time and to keep it white?

Any information would help!
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Old 05-29-2012, 05:40 PM   #2 
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Usually the sand will change colors with time....sometimes you can keep it turned or stirred up to help maintain the white color longer, however, you don't want to do this if you have stem/rooted plants...Plus, light colored substrate can sometimes cause the fish color to look washed out....you get best fish color with dark/neutral colored substrate.

If you are having stem rot on your plants-they may be planted wrong or the substrate went anaerobic...
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Old 05-29-2012, 05:53 PM   #3 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
Usually the sand will change colors with time....sometimes you can keep it turned or stirred up to help maintain the white color longer, however, you don't want to do this if you have stem/rooted plants...Plus, light colored substrate can sometimes cause the fish color to look washed out....you get best fish color with dark/neutral colored substrate.

If you are having stem rot on your plants-they may be planted wrong or the substrate went anaerobic...
Thanks so much for your reply!! :3

I like the white look the best, and tanks with whit backgrounds it looks sooooo clean and beautiful. Will the fish change colors to be washed out do you mean?

I can stir it, but I will have some plants... I have to remove the plants every time for cleaning anyways though. Would that be an issue with keeping anything alive?

... Hum, what causes "anaerobic" conditions and what prevents it from happening?
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Old 05-29-2012, 08:01 PM   #4 
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Anaerobic spot are caused by limited dissolved oxygen in the substrate.....or suffocation....too deep substrate is the usually cause and/or lack of aeration....

Rooted and stem plants are best left alone-by removing them with every water change it can disrupt growth....

Most common cause of live plant failures is related to the wrong color temp lights when its not incorrect planting, anaerobic issues, photoperiod

With light colored especially white substrate and background....the fish normal response or camo...is to blend in...a survival instinct....

With a closed system we have to make the water changes to maintain water quality, however, too clean can often be as bad as too dirty....too clean and the livestock can't build antibodies, you can destroy the good bacteria that help to keep the bad bacteria in check.....sometimes a little mulm and algae on non-viewing walls/items can be a good thing...even providing a place for microorganism to colonize that the livestock can graze on for a little extra nutrition.....
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Old 05-30-2012, 12:34 AM   #5 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
too deep substrate is the usually cause and/or lack of aeration....

Rooted and stem plants are best left alone-by removing them with every water change it can disrupt growth....

too clean can often be as bad as too dirty....too clean and the livestock can't build antibodies, you can destroy the good bacteria that help to keep the bad bacteria in check.....sometimes a little mulm and algae on non-viewing walls/items can be a good thing...even providing a place for microorganism to colonize that the livestock can graze on for a little extra nutrition.....
Oh yes already known. I only move the plants to the side of the tank in order to clean the substrate with a siphon- I never remove anything to clean it off. I leave some of the algae on the walls, just a little and it likes to stick around on my plants a little bit too.

Would moving these plants be bad? And would all sands act the same to the plant- I want to avoid having aeration issues. Maybe I could place stones or gravel under the plants? Do I need air circulation such as bubbles coming up too then?

I was planning on having 3/4 inches of gravel and 3/4 inches or 1 inch of sand on top of that. Tell me if you think it could be a problem with my set up.
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Old 05-30-2012, 11:31 AM   #6 
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The problem with layering sand and gravel it that it won't stay that way...it will mix over time.

Too deep of sand can cause anaerobic issues for plants

Airstones, filters..etc...don't add oxygen per se'-the way it works is that as the bubbles hit the surface you have gas exchange-otherwise the water would be super saturated......

The more agitation at the surface you drive more CO2 out and oxygen in-this isn't great for plants and with Bettas they don't need high dissolved oxygen in the water anyway-plus the plants add oxygen during the day.

What species of plants do you keep-can you post a pic....
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Old 05-30-2012, 03:28 PM   #7 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
The problem with layering sand and gravel it that it won't stay that way...it will mix over time.

Too deep of sand can cause anaerobic issues for plants

Airstones, filters..etc...don't add oxygen per se'-the way it works is that as the bubbles hit the surface you have gas exchange-otherwise the water would be super saturated......

The more agitation at the surface you drive more CO2 out and oxygen in-this isn't great for plants and with Bettas they don't need high dissolved oxygen in the water anyway-plus the plants add oxygen during the day.

What species of plants do you keep-can you post a pic....

This is my original thoughts to what to keep. I only have one plant right now (Phillipine fern or something) and intend to have more from this list...

Eleocharis ''parvula'' (LONG grass)

Possible plants
Lucky bamboo.
Pink or orange water lily.
Echinodorus 'vesuvius' (AWESOME snake bamboo-like twirls!)
Fissidens splachnobryoides (the bottom moss)
Marsilea quadrifolia (water shamrock)

Anubias, Petite Nana (just big leaves)
APONOGETON ULVACEUS (large flat curvy)
Vallisneria (long snake twirls)
Onion Plant (Crinum thaianum) (long, stingy, spacious)

Small tree-like plant

Substrate: Turface.
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