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Old 08-09-2012, 04:28 PM   #61 
FishyFishy89
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Originally Posted by Pilot00 View Post
Dont be so certain about that, certain breeds have been refined so much as to be stable and 'bred true' so to speak. And there are a ton of them. I am not a fan of the fact because the death toll to do so is humongous but...thats humanity i guess. Wait a decade or two more and see what genetic engineering will bring... We already have fish.
There is so such thing as a "stable breed". No breed can be "stable" be it mental or health wise.
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Old 08-09-2012, 04:39 PM   #62 
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As much as I would love to adopt a dog from a shelter, my parents wouldn't allow it. They assume that it would be a difficult dog to keep if it came from a shelter, but I know this isn't true. I did ask my mum about adopting a dog but she instantly said no. She obviously doesn't know much about rescued dogs.

The breeder we're buying from is not a backyard breeder and is almost definately responsible as we were recommended her on a dog website. I know this doesn't mean the breeder is definately a good one but it's a good sign, isn't it? We've also met the breeder and they seem very passionate and caring about their dogs. They've even had a whole extension done on their house just for the dogs!

I regret writing that post a few pages back about breeders/rescued dogs and I hope I didn't cause offense. :)
A dog from a shelter can be no more difficult than a puppy from a breeder.
Lets take my doberman. Purchased from a VERY well established and educated breeder. I tried everything in the training books. My last resort training tool was the shock collar. It was the only thing that got him to listen. After a year of training with the shock collar he was weaned down to the vibrating collar. And after that he was soon completely weaned from such tools. And to this VERY day he is still over flowing with energy. Even tho he has his own job and I do everything to tire him out.

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Old 08-09-2012, 07:37 PM   #63 
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Originally Posted by FishyFishy89 View Post
A dog from a shelter can be no more difficult than a puppy from a breeder.
Lets take my doberman. Purchased from a VERY well established and educated breeder. I tried everything in the training books. My last resort training tool was the shock collar. It was the only thing that got him to listen. After a year of training with the shock collar he was weaned down to the vibrating collar. And after that he was soon completely weaned from such tools. And to this VERY day he is still over flowing with energy. Even tho he has his own job and I do everything to tire him out.
Wow he is sooooo pretty :D
His coat is so shiny
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Old 08-10-2012, 05:35 AM   #64 
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I guess I look at it differntly, because in Norway we don't have shelters like the ones in the United States, but of course, homeless dogs we have many of.

I think its important to realize how much work it is behind serious breeding. It takes a lot of time and money to breed, if you take it seriously. You need to check all of your dogs for any illnesses, attending dog shows(atleast in Norway) ++ It cost A LOT of money and takes a lot of time. Of course there are bad breeders too, but you need to use a lot of time finding a serious breeder you trust, who has healthy dogs and who is willing to follow up on you and your dog for the rest of your dogs life.

I bought my dog from a serious breeder, and I'm not ashamed of it just because we got homeless dogs in the world. For me a "mutt" or a dog without a pedigree was never an option, because I would not be able to know anything about the dogs parents and their history of illness or temper. For me the most important thing was to get a healthy dog, and his pedigree makes me sure of it. When looking at his pedigree I'm sure that his parents and grandparents are healthy, and the odds for my dog getting sick is smaller. Buying a dog from a breeder also makes me sure that my dog has not been smuggled from other countries, which is illegal, and it wont carry any disease. When adopting a homeless dog you would not be able to know anything about where the dog came from and its genetics.

Maybe I will adopt a homeless dog next time I'm getting a dog, but for now I am happy with the choice I made buying from a breeder. When I look at my healthy boy, and I see how many sick chihuahuas there is in Norway, I know I made the right choice.. Wanting a healty dog doesnt make me a bad person, though..
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Old 08-10-2012, 07:48 AM   #65 
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That is so sad! and the pug is adorable!!
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Old 08-10-2012, 01:37 PM   #66 
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I guess I look at it differntly, because in Norway we don't have shelters like the ones in the United States, but of course, homeless dogs we have many of.

I think its important to realize how much work it is behind serious breeding. It takes a lot of time and money to breed, if you take it seriously. You need to check all of your dogs for any illnesses, attending dog shows(atleast in Norway) ++ It cost A LOT of money and takes a lot of time. Of course there are bad breeders too, but you need to use a lot of time finding a serious breeder you trust, who has healthy dogs and who is willing to follow up on you and your dog for the rest of your dogs life.

I bought my dog from a serious breeder, and I'm not ashamed of it just because we got homeless dogs in the world. For me a "mutt" or a dog without a pedigree was never an option, because I would not be able to know anything about the dogs parents and their history of illness or temper. For me the most important thing was to get a healthy dog, and his pedigree makes me sure of it. When looking at his pedigree I'm sure that his parents and grandparents are healthy, and the odds for my dog getting sick is smaller. Buying a dog from a breeder also makes me sure that my dog has not been smuggled from other countries, which is illegal, and it wont carry any disease. When adopting a homeless dog you would not be able to know anything about where the dog came from and its genetics.

Maybe I will adopt a homeless dog next time I'm getting a dog, but for now I am happy with the choice I made buying from a breeder. When I look at my healthy boy, and I see how many sick chihuahuas there is in Norway, I know I made the right choice.. Wanting a healty dog doesnt make me a bad person, though..
Exactly. You don't become a serious breeder overnight. You develop the skills and PROVE yourself with your work, research, time and yes even money spent on what you plan to improve on your breed of choice.

Not to mention your average breeder breeds more than 2 breeds. A SERIOUS breeder picks 1 breed, and finds traits/or health issues that need to be improved and possibly completely removed from the linage.

I do seriously believe in looking in your shelters 1st. No wanting a healthy dog doesn't make you a bad person. My little pug came with severe skin allergies. And when I finally found out what it was and how to fix it. It was a wave of relief. Not only could she now rest and relax whenever she wanted. So could I and my husband. I didn't have to yell at her because she was chewing on her arse for the past 5 mins non stop. I don't have to mummify her up every time we leave her alone or go to bed. Both of us could finally comfortably sleep. I say both because hubby could sleep through a nuclear bomb

My point is, even a rescue dog can be healthy. Tho like I said before, 90% of dogs come with allergies and other health issues. So if you get a pup with allergies or health issues, you need to put forth the effort to make him or her comfortable and healthy. Even if you find a reputable breeder, your pup is likely to come with allergies and other health issues. UNLESS that breeder can PROVE their pups will not have such issues. Then you more than likely will get a pup with allergies or health issues.

My doberman, yeah he is likely to have inherited the wobbler syndrome and may show signs when he gets older. But you know what? It is worth it to help out the doberman breed. And I am prepared with what I will have to do when the time comes.

I am firm believer in you shouldn't buy from a breeder unless he or she can prove that they are improving the breed. Why spend over hundreds of dollars on a dog that isn't making it's mark on it's breed when you can get a dog in a shelter and make a mark on IT'S life.
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Old 08-11-2012, 11:28 PM   #67 
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I disagree with petstores primarily because of how the dogs are treated. There's this one at the local mall that was shut down recently I believe called Furry Babies and they sold pure breeds but they were in baby cribs and the staff were dressed in nurses uniforms to further give the theme of infants and cuteness. I went in a few times just to glance around and they had energetic dogs already growing up in these pens. Like a border collie who was going crazy trying to get out and couldn't and she was getting to be adult sized and a St. Bernard who looked positively pathetic.

I got my dog from a local rescue and you know what all the staff did when I was walking him out of the place. Breathe sighs of relief. So many stopped and said: "I was so worried he wouldn't get a home."

"He's such a sweetie I don't know why no one was taking hm."

"If you hadn't adopted him I would've snatched him up after another week." And five years later he is the best dog I could hope to have. He's a pitbull/sheperd mix. I've seen both breeds and he is the mix of them. He's got big white paws a tan coat a long wireish tail associated with pits and his face..His beautiful sweet face is that of a pure german sheperd. Right own to his coal make up looking eyes.
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