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Old 09-07-2012, 05:40 PM   #1 
brookm
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Cleaning the tank

Right now I am doing water changes only when my test numbers show i need it but I cant seems to keep the bottom of my tank debris free. is that normal or do you normally take everything out every once and awhile and clean it? Also do you ever takes rocks structures plants etc out and clean them? as in like wipe them down etc? if not how do you clean them?
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:24 PM   #2 
ChoclateBetta
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I some times have that problem because I use sand.
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:42 PM   #3 
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I some times have that problem because I use sand.
my tank is bare bottom except 4 large river rocks
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:54 PM   #4 
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You don't want to base water change needs on test alone. Due to the DOC's (dissolved organic compounds) that build up that we don't test for-this can also be harmful to the long term health.

What size tank, filter, live plants, type of additive used, how long has it been running, is the nitrogen cycle established and what is the stocking.

It hard for life to thrive in too clean and sterile environments-some mulm/debris is okay-it can help with antibody development and by having a balance system the good pathogens can help control the bad-remembering not all pathogen become pathogenic.....
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:58 PM   #5 
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Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
You don't want to base water change needs on test alone. Due to the DOC's (dissolved organic compounds) that build up that we don't test for-this can also be harmful to the long term health.

What size tank, filter, live plants, type of additive used, how long has it been running, is the nitrogen cycle established and what is the stocking.

It hard for life to thrive in too clean and sterile environments-some mulm/debris is okay-it can help with antibody development and by having a balance system the good pathogens can help control the bad-remembering not all pathogen become pathogenic.....


5gal tank with a filter i have java moss and an anubias and I have only had the tank for about 2.5 weeks

How often should I test the tank while cycling?
and how often should i clean it?
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:02 PM   #6 
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I was wondering about this too... Thanks for starting a thread about it.
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:17 PM   #7 
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I am going to assume it has a single Betta...correct.....

Right now I would be making at least 50% weekly with vacuum in all areas that can be reached without moving anything-this is the water change you need to make for the life of the system to maintain water quality.

Then a 50% water only based on test results of ammonia, nitrite 0.25ppm or greater.
If you don't have a test kit-make that second 50% weekly water only as the safety net for the next 4 weeks.

Filter media-needs a swish/rinse in the bucket of old tank water a couple of times a month.

Remember-some additives can cause skewed or false test results.
Its a good idea to have base lines on-source water with and without additives you normally use.

When you have a lot of active growing stem and/or floating plants that are also big eaters- You may not see the nitrate reading we look for that tells us cycling stages/completeness-since these type of plants can use ammonia before conversion, however, the nitrogen cycle is still happening-its silent-plus our hobby grade testing product only test at a ppm level so you will always have some level of ammonia and nitrate.

Since the plants you list are generally slow growing and not big eaters-you should see nitrate in about 4-6 weeks more or less.

I would test your water daily while cycling-once you have nitrate of at least 5ppm without any ammonia, nitrite spikes for several days-you are most likely cycled and you can decrease testing to about 1-2 times a week-before and 24h after a water change and as needed based on fish behavior.
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Old 09-07-2012, 07:23 PM   #8 
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How often does the tank decor and equipment need to be cleaned? If at all...
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Old 09-07-2012, 08:06 PM   #9 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
I am going to assume it has a single Betta...correct.....

Right now I would be making at least 50% weekly with vacuum in all areas that can be reached without moving anything-this is the water change you need to make for the life of the system to maintain water quality.

Then a 50% water only based on test results of ammonia, nitrite 0.25ppm or greater.
If you don't have a test kit-make that second 50% weekly water only as the safety net for the next 4 weeks.

Filter media-needs a swish/rinse in the bucket of old tank water a couple of times a month.

Remember-some additives can cause skewed or false test results.
Its a good idea to have base lines on-source water with and without additives you normally use.

When you have a lot of active growing stem and/or floating plants that are also big eaters- You may not see the nitrate reading we look for that tells us cycling stages/completeness-since these type of plants can use ammonia before conversion, however, the nitrogen cycle is still happening-its silent-plus our hobby grade testing product only test at a ppm level so you will always have some level of ammonia and nitrate.

Since the plants you list are generally slow growing and not big eaters-you should see nitrate in about 4-6 weeks more or less.

I would test your water daily while cycling-once you have nitrate of at least 5ppm without any ammonia, nitrite spikes for several days-you are most likely cycled and you can decrease testing to about 1-2 times a week-before and 24h after a water change and as needed based on fish behavior.

yes a single betta and thanks I have been using an API test and have gotten my baseline which is all 0's 7.6 Ph


I tested my tank today(after a 25% water change) it is ammonia .5ppm nitrite 0ppm nitrate 5ppm ph 7.6

so basically i should do 2 50% water changes a week until my ammonia etc steady out to 0?
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Old 09-07-2012, 08:24 PM   #10 
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Here ya go:

http://www.bettafish.com/showthread.php?t=107771
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