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Old 11-20-2012, 12:30 PM   #11 
DragonFish
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Oh! I totally forgot about your question about the fin curling....

I highly, HIGHLY doubt it has any relation to the size of the tank. I've never heard of a larger tank resulting in curled fins; quite the opposite actually. Often a clear, warm environment with lots of space to move will aid in the uncurling of fins. Though often once fins curl, they generally stay that way for the most part.

Hard water does indeed cause fin curling. I would say in your case, thats probably it. Its nothing really to be concerned about, a little fin curling won't harm him.

I also must respectfully disagree with the idea of him being 'scared'. Based on my own research and experience, I can quite confidently say that bettas have quite the variety of personalities with contribute to behaviors such as flaring and nesting and the like.
Now, as far as tank size goes, often when moving a betta into a larger aquarium they can become stressed, pale, clamped, shy and/or lethargic. This leads most people to assume that bettas prefer smaller spaces, but IMO/E this is very often(with the acception of a few rare cases)not at all true. Bettas like cover, they like to have plants and caves to hide in, swim around, and rest on. It makes them feel much more secure....they do come from such a densely planted environment in the wild after all, and even though this commonly found betta species is quite far from wild, they still like a good bit of cover.....which often because of the expense is not provided properly when someone sets up a larger 5-10+ gallon aquarium. Its the bareness of the tank that is often what causes the stress as the betta feels exposed and vulnerable, not the volume of water. No tank is too larger provided there is enough cover for the betta to feel secure(this can also very depending on the personality of the individual betta....a more outgoing one might not mind the space so much, but a shyer, more timid personality might need to be given and extra plant or two).

But, in this case, as the video clearly shows this particular fish appears very content and not at all shy or skiddish about his home. Therefore, he probably just does not feel threatened by his own reflection and doesn't feel the need to defend his territory. Meaning it is just the kind of fish he is. ;)
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:27 PM   #12 
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Originally Posted by DragonFish View Post
Oh! I totally forgot about your question about the fin curling....

I highly, HIGHLY doubt it has any relation to the size of the tank. I've never heard of a larger tank resulting in curled fins; quite the opposite actually. Often a clear, warm environment with lots of space to move will aid in the uncurling of fins. Though often once fins curl, they generally stay that way for the most part.

Hard water does indeed cause fin curling. I would say in your case, thats probably it. Its nothing really to be concerned about, a little fin curling won't harm him.

I also must respectfully disagree with the idea of him being 'scared'. Based on my own research and experience, I can quite confidently say that bettas have quite the variety of personalities with contribute to behaviors such as flaring and nesting and the like.
Now, as far as tank size goes, often when moving a betta into a larger aquarium they can become stressed, pale, clamped, shy and/or lethargic. This leads most people to assume that bettas prefer smaller spaces, but IMO/E this is very often(with the acception of a few rare cases)not at all true. Bettas like cover, they like to have plants and caves to hide in, swim around, and rest on. It makes them feel much more secure....they do come from such a densely planted environment in the wild after all, and even though this commonly found betta species is quite far from wild, they still like a good bit of cover.....which often because of the expense is not provided properly when someone sets up a larger 5-10+ gallon aquarium. Its the bareness of the tank that is often what causes the stress as the betta feels exposed and vulnerable, not the volume of water. No tank is too larger provided there is enough cover for the betta to feel secure(this can also very depending on the personality of the individual betta....a more outgoing one might not mind the space so much, but a shyer, more timid personality might need to be given and extra plant or two).

But, in this case, as the video clearly shows this particular fish appears very content and not at all shy or skiddish about his home. Therefore, he probably just does not feel threatened by his own reflection and doesn't feel the need to defend his territory. Meaning it is just the kind of fish he is. ;)
Thanks so much for your input!! makes me feel better!

Just to be clear... when I do my water changes, I do NOT need to remove my fish form the tank right? In reading other threads - some say they should be re-acclimated to the new water. Is that for 100% water changes only, or have I been doing this wrong?
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:33 PM   #13 
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Originally Posted by DragonFish View Post
Oh! I totally forgot about your question about the fin curling....

I highly, HIGHLY doubt it has any relation to the size of the tank. I've never heard of a larger tank resulting in curled fins; quite the opposite actually. Often a clear, warm environment with lots of space to move will aid in the uncurling of fins. Though often once fins curl, they generally stay that way for the most part.

Hard water does indeed cause fin curling. I would say in your case, thats probably it. Its nothing really to be concerned about, a little fin curling won't harm him.

I also must respectfully disagree with the idea of him being 'scared'. Based on my own research and experience, I can quite confidently say that bettas have quite the variety of personalities with contribute to behaviors such as flaring and nesting and the like.
Now, as far as tank size goes, often when moving a betta into a larger aquarium they can become stressed, pale, clamped, shy and/or lethargic. This leads most people to assume that bettas prefer smaller spaces, but IMO/E this is very often(with the acception of a few rare cases)not at all true. Bettas like cover, they like to have plants and caves to hide in, swim around, and rest on. It makes them feel much more secure....they do come from such a densely planted environment in the wild after all, and even though this commonly found betta species is quite far from wild, they still like a good bit of cover.....which often because of the expense is not provided properly when someone sets up a larger 5-10+ gallon aquarium. Its the bareness of the tank that is often what causes the stress as the betta feels exposed and vulnerable, not the volume of water. No tank is too larger provided there is enough cover for the betta to feel secure(this can also very depending on the personality of the individual betta....a more outgoing one might not mind the space so much, but a shyer, more timid personality might need to be given and extra plant or two).

But, in this case, as the video clearly shows this particular fish appears very content and not at all shy or skiddish about his home. Therefore, he probably just does not feel threatened by his own reflection and doesn't feel the need to defend his territory. Meaning it is just the kind of fish he is. ;)
I completly agree with you. I have a few males in one gallons and others in larger tanks and it does not affect their flaring at all. I have one guy that has never flared and probably never will. I don't believe it has any affect on him at all. He is healthy and is all over the place. Not jumpy at all, just doesn't like to flare. Had him almost a year.
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:50 PM   #14 
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Originally Posted by stellar981 View Post
Thanks so much for your input!! makes me feel better!

Just to be clear... when I do my water changes, I do NOT need to remove my fish form the tank right? In reading other threads - some say they should be re-acclimated to the new water. Is that for 100% water changes only, or have I been doing this wrong?
Since you are cycling your tank, and therefore will not be preforming any 100% water changes, no you do not have to remove your fish from the tank when you preform your changes. ;)
Removing the fish and preforming a 100% water change(essentially completely breaking down the tank)is generally done as maintenance on smaller tanks that are unfiltered/can't establish or hold a stable cycle. Without the beneficial bacteria colony to break down the ammonia, a full tank cleaning at least once per week with smaller partial changes in between is required to compensate for that.

But, you don't need to worry about that. xD

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Originally Posted by Shirleythebetta View Post
I completly agree with you. I have a few males in one gallons and others in larger tanks and it does not affect their flaring at all. I have one guy that has never flared and probably never will. I don't believe it has any affect on him at all. He is healthy and is all over the place. Not jumpy at all, just doesn't like to flare. Had him almost a year.
Oh, definitely! I have had MANY bettas in various setups of various sizes, and while of course space and temperature affects activity level and health(obviously, a cold stressed fish is generally not going to want to flare at their reflection), it definitely comes down to the personality of the individual betta in regards to what they flare at and when and whatnot. ;)
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:19 PM   #15 
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Since you are cycling your tank, and therefore will not be preforming any 100% water changes, no you do not have to remove your fish from the tank when you preform your changes. ;)
Removing the fish and preforming a 100% water change(essentially completely breaking down the tank)is generally done as maintenance on smaller tanks that are unfiltered/can't establish or hold a stable cycle. Without the beneficial bacteria colony to break down the ammonia, a full tank cleaning at least once per week with smaller partial changes in between is required to compensate for that.

But, you don't need to worry about that. xD



Oh, definitely! I have had MANY bettas in various setups of various sizes, and while of course space and temperature affects activity level and health(obviously, a cold stressed fish is generally not going to want to flare at their reflection), it definitely comes down to the personality of the individual betta in regards to what they flare at and when and whatnot. ;)
Thank you, you've been very helpful!! How long have you been keeping fish?

I would eventually like to add a few Panda cories into this tank, i think they are cute :) How do you recommend approaching this situation? I assume I should wait until the tank is cycled? I dont want to put my betta's life in danger, and vice versa. They would come from the same place as my betta, which I hope is a good thing. They seem healthy there, been there many times and don't find any sick or dead fish. Its one thing to have only one betta in a tank though, but then to add and make it a community makes me nervous.. so it'll be a while! :)
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:52 PM   #16 
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Thank you, you've been very helpful!! How long have you been keeping fish?

I would eventually like to add a few Panda cories into this tank, i think they are cute :) How do you recommend approaching this situation? I assume I should wait until the tank is cycled? I dont want to put my betta's life in danger, and vice versa. They would come from the same place as my betta, which I hope is a good thing. They seem healthy there, been there many times and don't find any sick or dead fish. Its one thing to have only one betta in a tank though, but then to add and make it a community makes me nervous.. so it'll be a while! :)
Glad to be of help! ;)
Oh goodness....a few years? I think a grand total of six all together. Bettas specifically about three, and my dad prompted me into really getting more seriously into the hobby and doing the more in-depth research about three and a half/four years ago or so.

Hmm....how large was your tank again?
Yes, you will want to wait until you're tank has established a stable cycle for a good week or two before you start adding some other fish. Corys are a shoaling species, so kind of like tetras they really prefer to be in groups of about 5-6+(an exact number would of course depend on the size of tank)....but you can build this group up slowly so you don't over-load your tank with ammonia and crash the cycle, just a couple at a time every several days-a week should be fine.

Generally bettas and corys get along very well, I've heard of very few serious cases involving aggression between them(mostly the betta just likes to take their food....silly little piggys they are.), but you never know how a betta is going to react to tank mates until you try him with some....so a backup plan of some sort is always good to have, just as a precaution.

Another issue you might run into that I just mentioned is feeding. Bettas are little piggys, and often the trouble people run into keeping corys with their betta is that the betta will go after he algae wafers/shrimp pellets and eat themselves silly.
This is fairly easily dealt with, however. You can first try just feeding your corys at night, about an hour or two after the lights have been turned off and your betta has become less active/gone to sleep. Corys are nocturnal, so they'll happily nibble away at their meal in the dark and the betta will have no clue.
If that doesn't end up working(my silly boys tend to stay up late with me. ), for feeding time you can just catch your betta(and eventually train him to swim into the container, if you'd like)in his cup/small container/breeder box, feed him in there, feed the corys, and then let him out when everyone has finished eating. ;)
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Old 11-20-2012, 03:36 PM   #17 
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Glad to be of help! ;)
Oh goodness....a few years? I think a grand total of six all together. Bettas specifically about three, and my dad prompted me into really getting more seriously into the hobby and doing the more in-depth research about three and a half/four years ago or so.

Hmm....how large was your tank again?
Yes, you will want to wait until you're tank has established a stable cycle for a good week or two before you start adding some other fish. Corys are a shoaling species, so kind of like tetras they really prefer to be in groups of about 5-6+(an exact number would of course depend on the size of tank)....but you can build this group up slowly so you don't over-load your tank with ammonia and crash the cycle, just a couple at a time every several days-a week should be fine.

Generally bettas and corys get along very well, I've heard of very few serious cases involving aggression between them(mostly the betta just likes to take their food....silly little piggys they are.), but you never know how a betta is going to react to tank mates until you try him with some....so a backup plan of some sort is always good to have, just as a precaution.

Another issue you might run into that I just mentioned is feeding. Bettas are little piggys, and often the trouble people run into keeping corys with their betta is that the betta will go after he algae wafers/shrimp pellets and eat themselves silly.
This is fairly easily dealt with, however. You can first try just feeding your corys at night, about an hour or two after the lights have been turned off and your betta has become less active/gone to sleep. Corys are nocturnal, so they'll happily nibble away at their meal in the dark and the betta will have no clue.
If that doesn't end up working(my silly boys tend to stay up late with me. ), for feeding time you can just catch your betta(and eventually train him to swim into the container, if you'd like)in his cup/small container/breeder box, feed him in there, feed the corys, and then let him out when everyone has finished eating. ;)
Thank you, again!! Good info! My tank is ten gallon, btw. :)
I am trying to do all the possible research I can. I feel like fish are treated poorly too often, almost like they are disposable. It makes me sad to think of it :( I love pet stores to just wander and look at the animals, but its also depressing. Walmart has proven to be the most depressing fish area to look at! Their other fish appear to be in decent conditions, but the bettas - not so much. I feel bad for them, wish I could take em all! I can't even imagine the number of casualties.. :(

So yeah, this pushes me more and more to try and do it right! Fish keeping is definitely a lot more involved than I could have ever imagined, when done correctly! :)
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:02 PM   #18 
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Some bettas just aren't aggressive. It doesn't sound like he's scared. If he was, he would spend most of his time hiding, even if you came by. Also, depending on his age, he might not be ready to aggressive and territorial yet. Young males sometimes don't show aggression until they are older. My male isn't very aggressive at all, but he's still young. My female, on the other hand, is very aggressive and if they were ever to end up in the same tank together, she'd eat him for breakfast!
I don't think you need to put him in a smaller tank at all.
You Are right.. I had my betta for 1 year now and everytime he sees me he and other fish he flares. But when i first got him he never flared. he would just hide in a spongebob house , waiting until it is time to eat.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:04 PM   #19 
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Just remember!
Bowls are for soup not fish!
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*Disclaimer* I'm not rude, I'm blunt because I care.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:48 PM   #20 
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Thank you, again!! Good info! My tank is ten gallon, btw. :)
I am trying to do all the possible research I can. I feel like fish are treated poorly too often, almost like they are disposable. It makes me sad to think of it :( I love pet stores to just wander and look at the animals, but its also depressing. Walmart has proven to be the most depressing fish area to look at! Their other fish appear to be in decent conditions, but the bettas - not so much. I feel bad for them, wish I could take em all! I can't even imagine the number of casualties.. :(

So yeah, this pushes me more and more to try and do it right! Fish keeping is definitely a lot more involved than I could have ever imagined, when done correctly! :)
Ahh, I thought so. It looked about like a ten in the video, but of course hard to tell still.
So yes, about 5-6 little Panda Corys should be perfect. ;)

Oh goodness I totally know what you mean. Fish in general are so widely portrayed as a cheap, easy, and expendable pet.....its positively sickening how they're often not even treated as true living creatures.
Sigh. I really hope that one day in the future, people will start to understand that just because you can't physically touch an animal and just because the animal itself doesn't cost as much as others might doesn't mean they don't deserve to receive time, effort, love, and proper care.

....And that there is really no such thing as a cheap pet. Ever.
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