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Old 03-26-2013, 10:55 PM   #311 
AyalaCookiejar
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Hey Coppermoon, thanks for the great information on columnaris. I am setting up my sorority soon so it is good to know.

However, I have a few questions. Do you know if Jungle Clear Water might aide in treatment or possibly prevention? It contains PP and I successfully used it to rid my live plants of snails.

Also, does Kanaplex treat columnaris? I know that sororities are often lost to columnaris so if Kanaplex will not treat it well, I'd like to get a better medication to have on hand.

Thank you.
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:22 AM   #312 
Naladari
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There was a study in 09 on myco tuberculous.
Something about Benzothiazinones causing them to commit suicide or something.
There is a possibility that these could be the cure for at least your tanks.
Unfortunately I couldnt find much on the Benzothiazinones.
On google you can also find this http://drbroxmeyer.netfirms.com/001_...S_DISEASES.pdf

Ive also read that if you use a human tuberculous on fish there is a chance that the fish can survive the disease. Unfortunately I cannot find any sort of antibiotic that actually works on them.
The fact that this disease seems to be killing its host quickly leads me to believe that this bacteria is free living, the only other disease that I can compare it to is Naegleria Fowelri which is parasitic.

...thats all i got
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Old 03-31-2013, 05:23 PM   #313 
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Hi, I've been reading a lot of the posts on this subject, and I'm very sorry to all who have lost bettas because of this disease. However, I'm not sure if anyone else has noticed this, but I looked at the locations of the people who have seen this disease in their bettas, and most are from the Southern and Western parts of the US, and in Canada. Maybe the sick bettas are coming from breeders in these areas? Or maybe it's some other factor, like where their food shipments are coming from, the or the water/water systems in those particular areas, or a lot of other factors.
I think it would be very useful for people who have seen this to include their location in the description; sometimes it is not in the bio next to their post.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:13 PM   #314 
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I know a couple of them got the infected fish from one particular breeder down in Texas.

However, with fish being constantly shipped all over the country and the world, we aren't safe just because you live in PA and I live in NE.

Edit: I have also found that there are more breeders down in Texas for some reason (probably because it's warmer and I think some have outdoor tanks lol). Breeders are more likely to see it in their tanks because they handle such a large number of fish. I only have 8 bettas, vs the thousands that a lot of breeders have at any given time. I don't know a single breeder here in NE - I know of quite a few in Texas, some in Canada and one in Arkansas (Previously MO).

Last edited by AyalaCookiejar; 03-31-2013 at 06:16 PM.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:43 PM   #315 
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Yes I can vouch that Texas would be a great place for outdoor tanks. Only heaters in winter in some places. Mosquito larvae and algae would be rampant. The only problem would be birds but herons wouldn't bother much with tiny fish and netting would stop it.

A question would be if a 100% water change, gravel change, filter changed, heater changed, and tank change was done and maybe cutting off the infected tail portion, would it revive the fish?

Obviously fin removal is drastic measures but it would grow back, cause minimum to no pain, and potentially keep the fish alive.

My guess is it is genetic.

Last edited by Artemis; 03-31-2013 at 06:49 PM.
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Old 03-31-2013, 06:50 PM   #316 
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Sorry, I want to clear something up. Just so there isn't any misunderstanding, I was not implying that betta owners in the Northeast are safe from the disease. I just think that there may be some sort of correlation between the location and the number of outbreaks. It could be a biological factor, such as the climate or water supply, that is specific to those areas. It could be that bettas in those areas are bred outdoors, but wild bettas are outside all the time, so it's not like it's unnatural.
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Old 03-31-2013, 07:05 PM   #317 
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I don't think it's the location, though. I just think that there are more breeders in those areas. And Canada, of course, is an entire country, and they don't have outdoor tanks, obviously.

And I don't think there's any possible way to "revive" a fish from this. I know that cutting off infected portions of tails have worked for some people with fin rot, but this isn't fin rot. This is a bacteria that affect more than just the tail. Mycos causes lesions around the head area as well as pretty much every other symptom you could think of depending on the case. Plus, I do believe that their tails are similar to dogs nails - they don't feel it until you get too close to their body.

Also, this progresses so quickly that you would likely have to catch it right at the very beginning to have time to do that. They rarely live longer than 24 hours. You could go to sleep one night and notice that their fins are nearly nonexistent by the time you wake up.



Edit: I'm just going to compare it to population - you'll see more reported cases of cancer in states with a bigger population because there are more people. Like, I'm pretty sure that the population of New York CITY is like 4 times the population of the entire state of Nebraska. Anyways, with more breeders down in more populated parts of the country, you've got a higher population of domesticated fish.

Last edited by AyalaCookiejar; 03-31-2013 at 07:08 PM.
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Old 03-31-2013, 08:48 PM   #318 
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AshPell -

The disease in question has been positively identified as a Mycobacterial infection. (Coppermoon and Basement Bettas had their fish have verified, via laboratory analysis, that their fish were infected with Mycobacteria sp)

The disease does not affect only blue fish. Other colors are affected, too. However, it is possible that something about blue genetics makes this color especially prone to the effects.

It also is not location-specific. Mycobacterial infection of fish is, unfortunately, a world-wide problem. For more information, here is an excellent article about the disease. https://srac.tamu.edu/index.cfm/even...factsheet/231/

Mycobacterial infection causes a 'wasting disease' in which it can take a long time for a fish to die, and results in a variety of symptoms. The result is that it can be difficult to identify the specific cause of death.

Unfortunately, the only way to determine that a fish has a Mycobacterial infection is via lab analysis after death.

Last edited by LittleBlueFishlets; 03-31-2013 at 08:56 PM.
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Old 03-31-2013, 08:54 PM   #319 
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Artemis -

The infected fins, unfortunately, occur very late in the process. From what I've read, the disease (Mycobacterial infection) affects the internal organs first. By the time the fins turn gray/black, the fish is close to death.

This article has a lot of good information regarding the disease: Mycobacterial Infections of Fish

Last edited by LittleBlueFishlets; 03-31-2013 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 03-31-2013, 09:13 PM   #320 
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With your saying that they're close to death, is there anything recommended to try to counteract it? It's a bacterial infection - are there any super-strength anti-bacterial medications we could try?
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