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Old 03-29-2009, 09:07 PM   #11 
Emphasy
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Hmm.. what about a convict?
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:12 PM   #12 
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Would a diet of earthworms chopped up be okay until he/she got big enough for feeder goldfish so he/she's used to variety and not just pellets?
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:29 PM   #13 
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An African Clawed Frog will try to eat just about any fish it can fit in its mouth - and it thinks it's mouth is bigger than it's stomach, the greedy little buggers will try it on just about any fish unless there is a very clear difference in size in which it feels that it is the prey, and not the aggressor.
Having observed these traits in a clawed frog a friend of my mother's had in a tank of swordtails, angels and guppies, the tank eventually became only a frog tank. It ate the swordtails and guppies, and tried to chew on the angel fish enough times that it caused enough fin damage to eventually cause it fall ill and die.
I'd say either leave the frog in it's own small tank (especially if you plan on feeding it feeder fish, that's only encouraging the fish munching behavior, if it can eat one fish, why not all of them?) or stick it in a tank with an oscar, and hope the oscar eats the frog first.
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:35 PM   #14 
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I say put the frog in its own home.
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:36 PM   #15 
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how about you get a LARGE tank and put the frog with some large fancy goldfish
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:38 PM   #16 
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It would probably try to eat the goldfish.
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:38 PM   #17 
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I think I'll leave him in a tank on his own, then.. lol
I will most likely be purchasing a Betta and keeping him in a smaller tank, though.
I'll consider getting rid of my 5 1/2 gallon unless I store it for cleaning tanks..
The 10 gallon may be better for that job, though, especially with my Oscar.
My mum is awefully angry I got the frog (I'm 14..lol) and sneaking a Betta in the house will not be easy but I'll accomplish it. We keep treated water on hand for my other two fish.
Haha. I'm feeling devious today. I COULD set up the ten gallon and the five gallon as well as have the 35 gallon, my one gallon and a small betta tank ALONG with my frog.
That would be fun, but I don't know if I have the dresser space.. the 35 gallon has a stand and I need to purchase a hood for the ten gallon. I also need a larger tank for the frog when he gets bigger I'll purchase from the company in which I bought him from. Then I can use his smaller tank for a guppy or something. lol
I love fish.
What should I put in the 10 and 5 gallon aquariums once "Poe" my Oscar is moved into the 35 gallon?
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Old 03-29-2009, 10:01 PM   #18 
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The five gallon sounds like an ideal tank for a future betta. Contrary to popular belief, those tiny little cups they sell at the fish stores "for bettas" are not good for them, and are way too small. 2.5 gallons is the recomended minimum, and a 5 gallon actually gives you lots of space to decorate the tank with, which will bring much amusement as you watch your betta play around in his tank (they love decorations!). Likewise, on the topic of bettas, you can take a 10 gallon and either buy or create a (much cheaper and better) divider for it - see my DIY tank divider tutorial: http://www.fishforum.com/diy-aquariu...ividers-21866/
A divided 10 gallon can hold one male betta fish on each side, and they are entertaining to watch interact with each other.
OR you could take a 10 gallon tank and create a female betta sorority out of it. A female sorority requires no divider, and consists of 4-6 female bettas coexisting in a tank together. Be sure they have lots of caves and plants for hiding places from each other as they will need to establish a pecking order, but once that's done with, it's like having a tank of very pretty, colorful... guppies. That will rip any other fish to shreds.

Can you tell, being in the betta forum, that I am a bit biased towards bettas?
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Old 03-29-2009, 10:10 PM   #19 
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I think they're gorgeous fish. I love them, too. I'm actually working on establishing a small fish-based website. I'd actually love your help in that, if you'd like to. I was thinking about getting a 3 gallon "goldfish bowl" and putting a small live plant in it for the Male Betta I want. I need to research on how large Convicts get and look into other fish. I want a variety of different fish. I couldn't have a very large community in my ten or five gallon. Maybe a red-tailed shark in the five gallon with that dragon-looking thing i saw at petsmart.. the shark swims towards the middle/top and the dragon-looking thang just sits on the bottom. I need to read the thing at the pet store, though. I'm overly obsessed with fish. ):
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Old 03-29-2009, 11:23 PM   #20 
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Is the 'dragon-like' fish that is a bottom-dweller you are referring to a dragon goby (Gobioides brousonnetti) ? If so, please, please reconsider getting one. These fish become very large, very fast, and should be kept in nothing smaller than a 55 gallon tank. These fish can get over two feet in length! Over 12 inches is not uncommon within the first year alone, and that is simply too large for even a 10 gallon. They are brackish water fish (not fresh, and not salt) although they are often incorrectly labeled in many fish stores as fresh water. Do not believe that hogwash that the fish stores tell you about them being 'very adaptable fish that can do well in fresh or salt water tanks'. It is a lie. These fish can only survive for a limited amount of time in fresh water before they die, and making water 'brackish' does not involve just adding a little aquarium salt (another common lie the LFS like to say to attempt to get you to buy one). I wouldn't recommend trying to set up a brackish tank unless you are very experienced in aquariums, and don't have someone hawking over your shoulder about every little thing fish related you do, brackish set-ups require a lot of of additives and fiddling with water levels and special substrates and it gets expensive fast. And they can often develop a rather peculiar odor in the first several weeks as the tank cycles and settles with a bacteria colony.... many people don't particularly find it very pleasing.

If the dragon goby isn't the fish you were referring to, then please just ignore this post, xD;
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