Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Care
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-02-2009, 12:04 AM   #1 
Mecal
New Member
 
Mecal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: AZ
Few questions

Hey all,
I figure before I buy all the equipment, a tank, and of course, a betta, I'd ask a few questions.

I know (from reading here) 2.5gal is good, as well as a mini heater, and live plants (not necessary, but nice).

so:

1) when I get a fish, is there anything I need to do before I plop him in the tank?

2) what if I go home for the weekend? (2.5 days) how does that work with the fish? Can I not feed it? Or should I try and have someone do it for me?

thanks :)
Mecal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 08:55 AM   #2 
Kim
Member
 
Kim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Here are my suggestions:

Go with adjustable heaters. I do not find the mini ones to be very effective as far as heating goes, and the temperature will still fluctuate with the room temperature which is very stressful on the fish. I always recommend the 25 watt visi-therm stealth because it is VERY reliable and will last forever without any malfunctions.

Live plants are good.......BUT, you need the proper lighting, fertilizers, etc. There are a few easy to grow plants such as java fern and java moss, but I've never had much luck with them other than that they didn't die (but they didn't look good either). If you're on a budget and looking for a low maintenance tank, I recommend some silk plants. They look good, require no upkeep other than a scrub every once in a while, and last fairly long.

When you bring your fish home, you will need to acclimate him to your water. First, float the container for 15 minutes to let the temperature adjust. Then, remove 1/4 of the water and replace it with the new water. Continue doing this ever 10-15 minutes for about 45 minutes to an hour, but make sure that your container has an air hole during this period. Then, pour out as much old water as you can and dump the fish into the tank. Because he has been properly acclimated, he shouldn't show any signs of shock although he may still go and hide.

As for the weekends, your fish will be fine without food. How often will you be leaving? Every weekend?
Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 12:10 PM   #3 
kelly528
Member
 
kelly528's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Vancouver, Canada
A big thing to get out of the way before you get your fish is whether you will have your tank cycled or uncycled.

Personally, I would go with cycled because it requires smaller water changes but some people like uncycled... it's all a matter of preference.

Also, your betta will be just dandy without food for two days. Whatever you do, do NOT get suckered into those feeding blocks... they will only pollute the tank, posing a way bigger risk than starvation to your fish.
kelly528 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 12:30 PM   #4 
Mecal
New Member
 
Mecal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: AZ
I was thinking cycled, since I'd like it to be as low maintenance as possible :)

That's good to know about the weekend, and it would be for 1 weekend every 3 to 4 weeks.

and Kim, thanks for the suggestions, but what do you mean "float the container"?

Also, for the setup, I was thinking 3 gallon tank.
Mecal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 01:10 PM   #5 
Jynx
Member
 
Jynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bakersfield California
also don't forget to pick up a water treatment solution- unless you were planning to use purified bottled water. tap water has chlorine and fluoride and other such harmful additives that are bad for fish- you need to neutralize it with a with a water conditioner.
Jynx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 01:34 PM   #6 
ChristinaRoss
Member
 
ChristinaRoss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
great suggestions everyone
ChristinaRoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 01:45 PM   #7 
dramaqueen
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Central Texas
Also, if you are going to cycle, you'll need a good test kit. We recommend the API freshwater master test kit.
dramaqueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 01:47 PM   #8 
vaygirl
Member
 
vaygirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Middlesex County, NJ
Maybe a marimo ball or two for a plant? It's not really a plant, it's an algae ball. The nice thing about it is it helps keep other algae growth down. They're kinda cute.
vaygirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 01:55 PM   #9 
Jynx
Member
 
Jynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bakersfield California
my betta bulb plants look pretty good and are easy to look after. there's a looooong string of posts about them somewhere on here- http://www.bettafish.com/showthread.php?t=29642
maybe link will work :D
Jynx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 04:44 PM   #10 
TigerLily
Member
 
TigerLily's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North Carolina
Quote:
but what do you mean "float the container"?
When you buy a betta, a lot of the time they come in a plastic cup with air holes. When you get home, gently set the cup on the surface of the water. It should float on its own. Be sure the fish is still able to get to the air, that is extremely important. You may want to watch it to be sure it doesn't tip over or sink.

If your fish comes in a baggie (my male did) then you can float the bag in a similar way. Again, you must make sure that your little one can reach the air while he adjusts to the new water/temperature.
TigerLily is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.