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Old 11-20-2009, 08:08 AM   #21 
BurnishedOchre
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Originally Posted by aunt kymmie View Post
I'm not sure what you're asking as far as air/water/percentage but basically dehydrated foods contain zero water so they need to be completley rehydrated before you feed them to your fish. If the food isn't rehydrated before giving it to your fish, they eat the food "dry" and once in their gut it'll expand, presenting a potentially lethal situation for your fish.
What I do with my freeze dried foods is take an amount that looks to be half of what I'd normally feed (if it was live or frozen) and soak it in a shotglass of tank water until it's fully absorbed of water, then I feed it to my fish. HTH
I was meaning exactly what you just said - sorry about that! >_O That idea to halve what you would normally feed dry and soak that amount is really helpful - thanks for bringing it up. :)
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Old 11-20-2009, 12:14 PM   #22 
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Aw dang - yeah, that probably was the case. Now I realize that I should have kept it in aquarium water and not have let it dry out - dang it!

Yeah, I've heard a lot of controversy about the pre-packaged bacteria - it sounds almost too good to be true...and that sounds very logical about the bio wheel too. Makes perfect sense.

I got the idea of detoxified ammonia still being viable for the bacteria that convert it from this forum page here about a person's high ammonia level: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...t-32249/page4/ It gave me the idea that ammonia can get turned into ammonium, that if your pH is below 7 your waste will be ammonium while above 7 will be ammonia, that most strip tests will test levels of ammonium as ammonia and add it to the final total, that ammonium does not stress the fish, and that the nitrifying bacteria can eat ammonium. What are your thoughts?
Yeah that would definitely make sense... I was a little guarded because I know there are a lot of hokey 'ammonia removers' out there that do little other than starve your bacteria.


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I have a container of pellets actually, but I haven't been giving them to Desmoda because he hasn't been able to eat them due to their size...until now I really wasn't sure that the flakes were making him bloat up so much, but it's gotten pretty apparent, obviously! I will be crushing his pellets for him from now on. Now I just have some freeze-dried bloodworms and flakes that will stay in the shadows... that's all right though - I have luck that I will be able to go to the PetSmart a few hours away this weekend so I'll be sure to get some daphnia then, if they have any. :) Thank you for your advice - it is really appreciated!
Try crushing the pellets. A lot of people also find that if they keep offering pellets for long enough the betta will break down and eat them. It's almost something that they have to 'learn' to do because not only are the pellets big they are coated in gel to prevent them from sinking so the betta may just take it for a ball of plastic until he actually chews it.

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On the pea thing - I have heard a LOT of controversy on that treatment, but supposedly it works? I think I'll try the daphnia first, though - it seems more conducive to the fish's natural diet.
Daphnia is definitely on the safe side... The views on peas differ from forum to forum and stem IMO form the moderators' views on them. I frequent another very popular, very informationally accurate forum where people swear by peas. Whether they are safe fo regular consumption is arguable, but I think we can definitely conclude that if used sparingly and only for treatment of constipation (as opposed to prevention) they won't hurt one bit.
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Old 11-20-2009, 12:48 PM   #23 
BurnishedOchre
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Originally Posted by kelly528 View Post
Yeah that would definitely make sense... I was a little guarded because I know there are a lot of hokey 'ammonia removers' out there that do little other than starve your bacteria.



Try crushing the pellets. A lot of people also find that if they keep offering pellets for long enough the betta will break down and eat them. It's almost something that they have to 'learn' to do because not only are the pellets big they are coated in gel to prevent them from sinking so the betta may just take it for a ball of plastic until he actually chews it.


Daphnia is definitely on the safe side... The views on peas differ from forum to forum and stem IMO form the moderators' views on them. I frequent another very popular, very informationally accurate forum where people swear by peas. Whether they are safe fo regular consumption is arguable, but I think we can definitely conclude that if used sparingly and only for treatment of constipation (as opposed to prevention) they won't hurt one bit.
It is really hard to know what will be beneficial and what won't be, especially if you are bad at researching topics like I am. >< XD

*chuckles* That's actually a pretty funny image of a betta just pushing the pellet around until he realizes he can eat it... I'll definitely start by crushing them for him.

Just as an update, Desmoda can swim a lot better now though is still stopping randomly. I'll just keep an eye on him, because otherwise he seems just like normal - maybe he is even better than he was, actually - before this happened, he was always swimming quickly around the tank, which was leading to a slightly more ragged tail. Maybe his lower metabolism will actually be good for his healing process! I've also been keeping the tank light off almost all of the time save for a few hours and when I want to check on him - it has cut down his flaring activity considerably, which is nice as he was flaring a little too much before and gave him a new hole in his tail fin after the fungal treatment. :P Silly Desmoda. If the light were on in his tank, he would always flare at me when I came into the room after a class or time away from the room. *chuckles* A bit aggressive for a 'hello', don't you think? ^^

I really have to say that I can't thank you enough for all of this information - it is priceless!!
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Old 11-20-2009, 01:45 PM   #24 
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Glad to hear we could give you & Desmoda a hand :D
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Old 11-20-2009, 02:34 PM   #25 
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Originally Posted by kelly528 View Post
Daphnia is definitely on the safe side... The views on peas differ from forum to forum and stem IMO form the moderators' views on them. I frequent another very popular, very informationally accurate forum where people swear by peas. Whether they are safe fo regular consumption is arguable, but I think we can definitely conclude that if used sparingly and only for treatment of constipation (as opposed to prevention) they won't hurt one bit.
I've never understood the pea rationale. In its natural environment a betta is never going to come across peas as part of their diet. Daphnia, on the other hand, would be in plenty of abundance. I feed my betta daphnia on a regular basis and he's never come close to being constipated. Feeding daphnia is the "ounce of prevention" rule, IMHO.
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Old 11-20-2009, 03:25 PM   #26 
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I've never understood the pea rationale. In its natural environment a betta is never going to come across peas as part of their diet. Daphnia, on the other hand, would be in plenty of abundance. I feed my betta daphnia on a regular basis and he's never come close to being constipated. Feeding daphnia is the "ounce of prevention" rule, IMHO.
a) It works.
b) It's easy to find for those who cannot for any reason get frozen or live daphnia.
c) Wild carnivores consume vegetation in the stomach contents of their prey. Wolves and large predators tear open the stomach contents of ruminants and eat them. Cats nibble grass to aid their digestion. Aquarists feed their larger fish gut-loaded snails and shrimp as a diet supplement. Bettas eat herbivorous insects whole. Furthermore, with respect to what I have heard about peas damaging the digestive tract, we are talking about a fish capable of stomaching shards of chitin (insect exoskeleton).

I have never seen a legitimate paper regarding the negative effects of peas... perhaps I will have to research the matter and report my findings here, but I simply cannot buy the argument that betta should never eat veggies, because they do.
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Old 11-20-2009, 08:43 PM   #27 
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From Bettababy, who is a member here and an aquatics nutritionist/specialist:
I don't use peas, have never used peas, don't suggest peas for a betta. Giving a laxative to a fish, especially when it isn't a part of their natural diet, is a dangerous game to play. That sort of thing can cause internal damage and digestion problems. Bettas are meat eaters, they need the protien. Their digestive tract is not designed to handle vegetable matter/roughage, and that is why it works so well as a laxative.)
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Old 11-20-2009, 09:26 PM   #28 
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That's what I'm saying... everybody says this but there's nothing to back it up. If the fact that they worked as a laxative meant that betta's stomachs weren't designed to handle them, wouldn't that mean daphnia is bad for digestion as well?

If I find any papers on it that would be enough to convince me, but anything without solid evidence can be pretty much written off as a myth.
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Old 11-21-2009, 12:22 AM   #29 
aunt kymmie
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The point being made here is that daphnia is a part of their natural diet. Peas are not indigenous to the area from which bettas hail from. I can feed cabage to my dogs and it will certainly act as a laxative but I'm sure it puts their guts in an uproar and isn't a pleasant experience for them. Dogs eat grass for this purpose, which is a natural process for them. Sure, cabbage will work for dogs, peas will work for bettas, but just because it *works* doesn't mean it's good for them.

It's late for me but tomorrow I will go hunt down the scientific proof that peas are not the preferred method for relieving constipation in bettas. I remember reading the article which convinced me and which is why I now keep daphnia on hand.

Last edited by aunt kymmie; 11-21-2009 at 12:23 AM. Reason: typo!
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