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Old 11-09-2013, 10:51 PM   #1 
Bombalurina
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Grammar and Spelling ANGST

Anyone who knows me will be able to tell you that I hate it with a burning passion when people use incorrect grammar or spelling. Typos I can forgive, but consistently mis-spelling a word or making a grammatical error because you actually think that is correct or simply don't care will make me very, very angry.

And you won't like me when I'm angry.

Yes, I am the Grammar-Hulk.

Here are things that make me particularly filled with rage:

- Could of/would of/ should of. No, no, no. Could have. Should have.

- Could care less. If you could care less, you obviously care some small amount. What you mean is "I couldn't care less". There is literally no lesser amount that you could care.

- Tidbit. Do Americans really say that? Honestly, guys, it's titbit.

- Tad bit. You cannot have a "tad bit". That is utterly nonsensical. A tad IS a bit. It's like saying a "bit tad" or a "tad piece" or a "piece bit".

- Hence why. Hence means why! It's tautology, and that's bad.

- Rice patty: I see this all the time time on here, and it frustrates me a lot. A rice patty would be a burger-shaped thing made of rice. Don't tell me that's where bettas really come from. They come from paddies. A rice paddy. That's the big field. Not patty.

- Their/they're/there. This one is so basic. Stop getting it wrong! There: he is over there. Their: it is their house. They're: contraction of they are. They're a terrible group of grammar snobs.

- Your/you're. Again, it's a contraction. As some wise sage once said, "It's the difference between knowing your s*** and knowing you're s***".

- Its/it's. Yes, yes, I understand, usually apostrophes mean that the word is possessive, but they also mean that something is a contraction, we needed to make an exception for this word. Just learn the difference. It's = it is. Its = it belongs to it. On that note...

- Incorrect use of apostrophes. In the vast majority of cases, they denote a possessive. Please, please don't say that you have many betta's. That makes NO sense. You have many bettas. However, that is your betta's food, or, if you have multiple bettas, that is your bettas' food.

- Then instead of than. Who started that? I'd rather eat my pizza then get eaten. Well, if that's what you want. I'd rather eat my pizza THAN get eaten, but we all make different choices.

- Incorrect use of commas. Grrrrrrr.

- Incorrect use of semi-colons. GRRRRRRRRRRR.

- Not knowing how to use quotation marks. This drives me up the wall. "It's raining today." Said Mary, "I hope it stops." GO AWAY. "It's raining today," said Mary. "I hope it stops."

- Lose/loose. They mean two totally different things. You did not let your goat lose, you let it loose. And I won't loose my mind over this, I will lose it. Also note: chose and choose mean two completely different things.

- To/too/two. Why are we still having to correct people?

- Using an adjective as an adverb. You don't sleep good or run fast, you sleep well and run quickly.

I'll stop ranting for the moment, but please, share your English-language peeves here. I am full of sympathy.

Note: if English is your second language, we can't hate you for making these mistakes. Goodness knows I could kill a native Deutschlander with my German grammar.

Last edited by Bombalurina; 11-09-2013 at 10:55 PM.
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Old 11-09-2013, 11:43 PM   #2 
dramaqueen
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I agree with all of the above, especially the would of instead of would have.
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:13 AM   #3 
twolovers101
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I agree with everything except this (as I use these phrases a lot myself).

Quote:
- Tidbit. Do Americans really say that? Honestly, guys, it's titbit.

- Tad bit. You cannot have a "tad bit". That is utterly nonsensical. A tad IS a bit. It's like saying a "bit tad" or a "tad piece" or a "piece bit".
I started my college career as an English major, I switched to music not because I don't love the English language, but because I enjoy music and teaching music more. These are colloquial phrases that I would NEVER use in my professional writing (unless the piece called for it), but when it comes to normal conversation, I have no qualms about using these as it expresses my own personal "voice" and heritage. I'm Texan. Yes, there it is, I'm SOUTHern. REALLY southern. So yes, I do use these phrases and do not consider them as anything other than what they are, colloquial language.

As it is, I also use TIDbit never even heard of TITbit, what the heck is that anyway? I wonder if it's just a southern American thing... Also... I kind of took that American jab a little personally... Not that I think it was meant that way, but yes we really say it (at least I do) and no, I'm not an idiot or a moron for saying it. I also use "tiddly bit" on occasion. I see it as the use of the phrase "a little bit", the word "tad" or "tit" in this case meaning "little".

"Tad bit" and "tid bit" mean exactly the same thing in my book.

It's 12 am for me now... so I'm going to stop before I get myself in trouble. I do agree with everything else, and misuse of you're/your, too/to/two/ and they're/their/there drive me nuts.

Last edited by twolovers101; 11-10-2013 at 12:16 AM.
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:19 AM   #4 
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Perhaps I should give some context - I'm English, and a lot of phraseology coming in from the US sounds *really* weird to me, so when I say "Do Americans really say that?" I mean it simply as an expression of, "Wow, that sounds truly bizarre", rather than "you're an idiot. :) Still drives me nuts, though, particularly when I hear non-Americans say it. :p I wonder if it has anything to do with you guys having a looser pronunciation of the letter T, and eventually that word just morphed into a having a D.

Tiddlybit is fine, but "tad bit"? It's just so tautological. Makes me twitch. Sorry. :p
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:23 AM   #5 
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You know what word I have noticed Americans use? Drugged, instead of dragged. I found this and apparently it may well be an American thing (comments at the bottom).

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/drag

Otherwise, unless the spelling/grammatical errors make it impossible to read, I don't really care how people post online.

I often make mistakes because I am in a rush when I post and I end up leaving out words or misspelling them. Usually I will go back and edit my posts if I can be bothered but I figure that this is an online forum dedicated to bettas and not grammar so it doesn't really matter.

It is difficult because I grew up with a younger brother who has the weirdest way of spelling/sounding out words. I don't know if it was dyslexia or not, but the way he sees and spells words appears to be completely different to how other people do. Even when the right word would appear in the spell-check, he simply couldn't recognise it.

Therefore, I tend to be less anal retentive about bad spelling/grammar. I do even basic maths pretty poorly and if everything had to be written out in something like logarithms I would struggle.
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:25 AM   #6 
twolovers101
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It's fine, I totally understand. Pronunciation that some people use kind of weirds me out also, and there are some things that English individuals say that I react to like "What the heck does that even mean? That makes no sense at all". Lol.

Honestly, I think it's just a geographical thing and how language has evolved in different cultures. Phrases that I would say here in Texas, make absolutely no sense at all to my friends from Minnesota even.

Needless to say, I love language, and how it develops in different areas of the world is fascinating to me. Also where did the phrase "sixes and sevens" originate? xD I'm still kind of confused as to its meaning.

Quote:
You know what word I have noticed Americans use? Drugged, instead of dragged. I found this and apparently it may well be an American thing (comments at the bottom).
o.O I haven't heard that one yet, but I do hear "hanged" instead of "hung" and vise-versa :/
For instance, someone will say "He was hung" when it should have been, "He was hanged". Drives me nuts.

Looking over the link I realize I have heard "drug" instead of dragged, it makes perfect sense to me. Though I'm pretty sure it's just a southern (generally) dialect that uses that instance of the word.

Last edited by twolovers101; 11-10-2013 at 12:32 AM.
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:35 AM   #7 
Bombalurina
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Oh, just did some research on the whole tit/tid thing - apparently, tidbit was the originaly spelling, which went over to the US, where it stayed the same, whilst evolving into titbit in the UK. Oddly enough, you are being truer to the original English by saying tidbit.

That said, it's still totally weird and I will continue to say titbit, because tidbit sounds WRONG. :p

I find the way the US does have a past-tense of certain words (spit, for instance) extremely odd. I wonder why spat just isn't used?
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:40 AM   #8 
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Haha! +1 for Texas!

Spat is used, it's just not as common I think. Though I can't say I've ever heard "He spit(or spitted) at him" used as past tense. Spit just isn't used as often in general. But again, it's probably just a weird American thing... We tend to not follow the rules lol. The most common thing that spat is used for now is to describe disagreements or arguments. For instance "my husband and I had a spat last night".

Last edited by twolovers101; 11-10-2013 at 12:42 AM.
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:44 AM   #9 
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My relatives use the word 'them ' like this: I was with David and them. ' Or 'them beans ain't no good.'
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Old 11-10-2013, 12:46 AM   #10 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dramaqueen View Post
My relatives use the word 'them ' like this: I was with David and them. ' Or 'them beans ain't no good.'
Yep, I do that It's that darn colloquial dialect again xD
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