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Old 07-24-2010, 07:24 PM   #1 
louu
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Reminder! Deadly Gas Bubbles

Just a quick reminder to always move and vac under all objects when performing weekly maintenance.

I discovered one this morning which had collected underneath the broad and flat but slightly indented foot of my sponge filter and un even gravel (the sponge filter itself wasnt dangerous just the fact that I didnt vaccuum it right) I instantly recognised it after reading an article a year ago. I grabbed a net and some water from another safe tank and put him in a 3 litre container (3/4 gallon) half his side on one side quickly became speckled with red just like ammonia burn and he become sluggish and confused (got stuck beside the filter before I got him out)

Thankfully though he seems to be improving at first he was slumped against the side of the container and was breathing incredibly hard, now he sits free of the wall and un clamps his fins to regain balance. But he was only in contaminated water for 1 or two minutes tops (if that) and the tank would have only been a few months old.

This isn't meant to scare you silly but just remind you that its a very real threat and could happen to anyone with any substrate.

You can recognise it by a clear silky cloud the comes from under an object almost like clear smoke. It looks exactly the same as gas from the barbecue or other gas appliance only it's under water.

Phew this wasnt meant to be so long! And I am guessing the gas was residue from all the poop could someone clarify what it actually is?

Thank You for reading!

Lou
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Old 07-24-2010, 07:31 PM   #2 
frogipoi
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Sounds Strange.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:03 PM   #3 
JamieTron
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probably carbon dioxide to be honest.
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Old 07-27-2010, 09:13 PM   #4 
louu
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yes after more thought I doubt it was another too dangerous but after reading an article on fish that were killed in six hours after a gas bubble was released and my fish looking so poorly I freaked out. But he was definately affected whatever it was. Coming out in red streaks and speckles while he was in that water and it definately wasnt there before but I am not too worried I did a large water change and will see how that goes.. I have chilled..

hmm I didn't think of CO2 and I appreciate your honesty :) I would rather be told straight then be cotton balled
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Old 07-27-2010, 09:14 PM   #5 
louu
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*change 'another' in the first sentence to 'anything'*
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Old 07-27-2010, 09:47 PM   #6 
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Well there is a disease which can occur in fish which is called gas bubble disease, mostly caused by high levels of nitrogen but it can be caused by other gases. It is good you are concerned actually. High gas levels should be watched. I would say you are okay though as it was probably not nitrogen gas which would be the biggest threat.

What happens is that the gas pressure causes what is similar to divers that come to the water surface too fast. The fish can get gas bubbles in the blood stream. This can further cause pop eye, and even cause embolisms. I took a minor in aquaculture and we had some issues with pop eye from high gas levels in some tanks. If you are concerned your fish could be effected by gases in the water you will notice constant bubbles that form on the surface of the skin and around or in the eyes. This isn't to be mistaken with the temporary bubbles that may stick to your fish when you do a water change. These bubbles will stay on your fish.

You have a good eye my friend it is good you looked into it

If you are more interested someday I could try to find safe saturation levels for certain gases in my fish health text books and notes I will be unpacking them soon as I am going back to school in August

Last edited by JamieTron; 07-27-2010 at 09:53 PM.
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