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Old 05-28-2014, 09:30 PM   #11 
LittleBlueFishlets
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If the lumps look fluffy or cottony, this would indicate Columnaris, which is a bacterial infection.

If the lumps are harder looking, it could be a cyst, a tumor, or a viral condition Lymphocystis.

Lymphocystis is a common viral disease which results in small, raised white spots. (Sometimes, they'll resemble a tiny cauliflower.) There is no treatment, since it's caused by a virus. Usually, the fish's immune system will fight it off within several weeks to months.

Below are two photos of fish with lymphocystis (where the cysts are fairly large though), followed by two links that contain good information.






Links:
- University of Florida - Lymphocystis Disease in Fish
- Pet MD - Viral Infection (Lymphocystis) in Fish
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:21 PM   #12 
AARRGGHHH
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That's kind of subjective, but if I understand what you're saying, the lumps do not look fluffy.
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:29 PM   #13 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleBlueFishlets View Post
If the lumps look fluffy or cottony, this would indicate Columnaris, which is a bacterial infection.

If the lumps are harder looking, it could be a cyst, a tumor, or a viral condition Lymphocystis.

Lymphocystis is a common viral disease which results in small, raised white spots. (Sometimes, they'll resemble a tiny cauliflower.) There is no treatment, since it's caused by a virus. Usually, the fish's immune system will fight it off within several weeks to months.

Below are two photos of fish with lymphocystis (where the cysts are fairly large though), followed by two links that contain good information.
LittleBlueFishlets, thank you very much for the information, pictures, and links.

It's a bit difficult to decide whether it looks like Columnaris or Lymphocystis. They look a bit like the lump on the yellow fish's picture. Do you have any pictures of Columnaris? Is Columnaris treated with Erythromycin, and if so, for how long?

Many thanks
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:43 PM   #14 
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Beautiful Betta wasn't scolding you. Water quality can play a huge part in diagnosis. We do need to know about your tank conditions in order to find out what the problem might be, including temperature and chemical parameters. Different diseases thrive in different conditions.

Since you didn't seem to like the big question sheet, here's a smaller one.


Do you use water conditioner?

Is the tank heated?

What is the water temperature? (Certain parasites and infections thrive at different temperatures.)

Does the tank get a lot of light? (Same reason.)

Is the tank filtered, or just aerated?

When did the symptoms show up?

Does it look like this? http://www.bettafish.com/showthread.php?t=382090


Next, you'll need a picture. This is crucial. Here are two methods in getting one.

Hold a mirror or a picture of another betta up to the tank so your betta flares. Then take your picture. It is preferable not to use flash, because that can make things harder to see when photographing fish.

If you can't get a picture that way, you may need to take your betta out of the water, lay him on a paper towel so we can see the lumps, and photograph him (again, no flash if possible). If you have to do it this way, be quick about it. You don't want your fish to suffocate or become too stressed.

We really need pictures if you want help.

One more thing, and don't take this too personally. Can you maybe be a little more polite to the people who've responded? I can see you're worried, but acting exasperated or criticizing the questions that are asked isn't going to do you any good.

Most of these forum members are pretty knowledgeable, and the ones who frequent this section are especially so. Collectively, they've saved dozens, if not hundreds, of fish over the years this forum has been around. Their methods might seem roundabout, but if you want help, you'll just have to trust that they're concerned for your fish just like you are and have experience answering questions about illnesses.

Bottom line: None of us want your fish to be sick, and providing us with a little more information, even if it's information you don't think we need, will cost you nothing. But it might save your fish.

Last edited by myexplodingcat; 06-01-2014 at 11:49 PM.
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Old 06-02-2014, 12:34 AM   #15 
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The majority of aquatic bacterial illnesses, including Columnaris, are caused by species of gram-negative bacteria.

However, Erythromycin only treats gram-positive infections. So if he does have Columnaris, this wouldn't be effective. Likewise, antibiotics won't treat viral conditions, so if he has Lymphocystis, it won't work on that either.

Columnaris is opportunistic, meaning that the bacteria that causes it is common in aquariums. If the fish's immune system is healthy, it can often fight off infection. But if something happens to weaken the immune system, the Columnaris can gain a foothold. When this happens, it can be pretty aggressive. In other words, if the white region is spreading, and look like bits of cotton, then it's likely to be Columnaris.

Below is a photo of a fish with severe Columnaris.


If it's not Columnaris, it could be a viral condition such as lymphocystis (as mentioned), or a cyst, or a tumor, or even an external parasite.

However, cysts and tumors generally only affect ONE side of the body. So you'd see a lump or bump on the right side. Or the left side. But usually not both sides. (Unless the cyst/tumor was large enough that it had spread the width of the body.)

Since it sounds like he has two separate lumps, one of which broke off, then to me, it sounds more like lymphocystis. Another thing to consider is an external parasite. There are some that cause small white lumps or bumps. But the affected region sounded larger fairly large (the size of a BB is pretty big).

Is he eating ok now? You'd said that he was having trouble with the larger bloodworms. Is this something new? And if so, has it gotten better?

Lymphocystis can cause pimple-like growths on the body. If they occur on the fins, it's unsightly, but not a health-risk. However, if they occur in vital areas, such as the gills or mouth, it can make eating or breathing difficult. There's no treatment for viral conditions, such as lympho. About all you can do is support the immune system, provide good nutrition, optimize water and environmental conditions, reduce stress, etc. If that's done, then often the fish's immune system can fight off the infection, but it still takes some time.

If you can't get photos, another option is to go an internet search for that condition and view images. You might be able to find something that resembles what he has.....

Last edited by LittleBlueFishlets; 06-02-2014 at 12:48 AM.
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