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Old 08-30-2010, 03:34 PM   #1 
Fishbowl
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Question To small?(Question from a confused newbie)

I have a 1.5 and a 2.5 gallon tank for a single betta. Both tanks have all the fixings like Betta freindly filters and all that. And with all my reading I'm not sure if these is way to small. If they are what's the absolute minimum I can use?
I'm really new, this is my first betta. And any help you can give me (I read all the stickies and what not on this site but I'm still confused) Wold be a massive help.
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Old 08-30-2010, 04:12 PM   #2 
karlhague
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishbowl View Post
I have a 1.5 and a 2.5 gallon tank for a single betta. Both tanks have all the fixings like Betta freindly filters and all that. And with all my reading I'm not sure if these is way to small. If they are what's the absolute minimum I can use?
I'm really new, this is my first betta. And any help you can give me (I read all the stickies and what not on this site but I'm still confused) Wold be a massive help.
Welcome to the forums.

Alot of people here reckon 2 gallons minimum.

However 1.5 gallons isnt that far of that.

Bearing in mind the bigger the tank, the easier to maintain they are.

I personally have my Betta in an 8 Gallon
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Old 08-30-2010, 04:14 PM   #3 
Laurenie
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Well, you're going to get many different opinions on what the minimum tank size is lol. Keeping your fish happy and healthy doesn't always mean simply putting them in a bigger tank.

IMO, the most important thing you can provide is clean, warm water. I have a 10 gallon tank divided into 3 sections, so each betta has approximately 3.3 gallons of space and this seems to be plenty. The tank is cycled and heated with a submersible thermometer. I have found that maintaining proper water params is quite easy in this tank.

My biggest concern with small tanks (anything under 5 gallons), is that it is very difficult to heat them properly, meaning keeping them at a stable temperature. They make mini-heaters but they are not adjustable, and IMO not very reliable and can cause alot of temperature fluctuations which will stress out a fish. Bettas *can* do ok at room temp in most houses but they are not going to be nearly as active as they would at warmer temps.

As far as filters go for tanks that small, my opinion is that they're not really necessary. Due to the small size of the tank you are going to want to do water changes quite often anyway, making the filter pretty much obsolete. The filter is also probably taking up some of the room that could be used for swimming/decorations in a small tank also.

Just my thoughts, take them with a grain of salt lol. I'm sure others will share their experiences.
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Old 08-30-2010, 04:47 PM   #4 
Adastra
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For the most part, I agree with Laurenie. 2 gallon and larger containers are the most suitable because below that, they become difficult to heat. The smallest adjustable heaters are typically designed with a 2 gallon minimum in mind. I don't feel that heaters are optional at all for keeping bettas, they are tropical fish that need stable temperatures in the range of 78-83 degrees--unless you live in a tropical climate these temperatures probably are not the norm for you, and even so, there's no telling when you might encounter a cold front.

Smaller tanks are also harder on the fishkeeper from a maintenance standpoint--a 2.5G container would need a 100% water change every 4-5 days, and a 1.5 would need a 100% water change every 3 days. Larger tanks are easier to maintain a colony of beneficial bacteria in, these bacteria break down the toxic ammonia fish excrete as waste into much less harmful compounds, eliminating the need for frequent 100% water changes. With cycled tanks, you only need once weekly partial changes. It is possible to cycle small tanks, but you would need a lot of live plants and a decent filter that doesn't produce a lot of current, but has enough surface area to house a bacterial colony. This is another reason why bigger is better.
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:59 PM   #5 
Fishbowl
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Alright, that's just what I needed to know. I *Might* have a 5 to 10 gallon+ tank laying around my house somewhere. And in that I might just do a Betta and a layed back bottom feeder.
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