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Old 05-28-2011, 10:05 AM   #11 
PewPewPew
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Omg, mine do it too. Its annoying. Bury deep and use the surrounding gravel to help, steal some away from other areas.

It can float, but does better in the substrate. Its a little hard to swim through, so not too much floating.
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Old 05-28-2011, 11:18 AM   #12 
BlueHaven
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Oh, okay!
Thanks. ^__^
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Old 05-28-2011, 05:21 PM   #13 
Oldfishlady
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One of the biggest reasons for aquatic plants to fail...are the lights....or better said...wrong lights....proper lighting is the driving force behind successful planted tank...not only the proper light but the age of the light bulb and the photoperiod......

What you can see and what the plant can use for energy are two different things...

You want daylight bulbs with a kelvin rating of 6500-6700k......daylight bulbs are usually what they are called...watts are just for a general guideline and really don't have anything to do with plant growth per se'......

Photoperiod-for live plants- you need to start with 10h/day and increase to 12h/day based on plant growth and algae...its a balance....the plants have to out-compete the algae for light and nutrients....if you start seeing algae-increase the photoperiod to help the plants grow better.....too short a photoperiod and you can trick the plants into thinking the season has changed and they may go dormant, die or growth will slow and algae will take over.....and in some cases it can help the plant flower....but that another issue....lol.....

Too old light bulb-you may be able to see but the plants can't use the light for energy and growth-as the bulbs age the intensity/spectrum changes and this impedes photosynthesis....bulb need to be changed every 6 months if on a 12/h/day photoperiod and yearly if on 10/h/day photoperiod......

You also have the plastic or glass between the light and water that can hamper light penetration.....this needs to be removed or kept cleaned and free of debris.....

Check your light and make sure they are the proper kelvin, age, clean the plastic/glass between the lights/water, stop the excel (this can melt weak and/or sensitive plants), increase photoperiod to 10/h/d or if already on 10/h/d increase to 12/h/d, make 25% water changes 3 times a week....you can let the plants float or bury in the substrate-in shallow substrate use a rock on top of the stem to keep it submersed until roots form to anchor.......

Another big reason for planted tank failure is using non-aquatic plants......
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Old 05-28-2011, 06:27 PM   #14 
LittleBettaFish
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Talking

Also, if the bioload on your tank is only light, than there may not be enough nutrients available in the water column for your plants. If you're only dosing Excel, you might be deficient in either macro (Nitrogen, Potassium, and Phosphates) or micro (trace) elements. Duckweed often absorb a lot of nutrients from the water, and it, along with other fast-growing stems are often the first plants to indicate a deficiency.

I'd recommend picking up a small bottle of Seachem Flourish, although dosing Seachem Potassium alongside it is recommended. Fertilizers can be a limiting factor in the growth of plants. No matter how much lighting you run or for how long, if there are no nutrients available to your plants they won't grow.
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Old 05-30-2011, 04:48 AM   #15 
sayurasem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
One of the biggest reasons for aquatic plants to fail...are the lights....or better said...wrong lights....proper lighting is the driving force behind successful planted tank...not only the proper light but the age of the light bulb and the photoperiod......

What you can see and what the plant can use for energy are two different things...

You want daylight bulbs with a kelvin rating of 6500-6700k......daylight bulbs are usually what they are called...watts are just for a general guideline and really don't have anything to do with plant growth per se'......

Photoperiod-for live plants- you need to start with 10h/day and increase to 12h/day based on plant growth and algae...its a balance....the plants have to out-compete the algae for light and nutrients....if you start seeing algae-increase the photoperiod to help the plants grow better.....too short a photoperiod and you can trick the plants into thinking the season has changed and they may go dormant, die or growth will slow and algae will take over.....and in some cases it can help the plant flower....but that another issue....lol.....

Too old light bulb-you may be able to see but the plants can't use the light for energy and growth-as the bulbs age the intensity/spectrum changes and this impedes photosynthesis....bulb need to be changed every 6 months if on a 12/h/day photoperiod and yearly if on 10/h/day photoperiod......

You also have the plastic or glass between the light and water that can hamper light penetration.....this needs to be removed or kept cleaned and free of debris.....

Check your light and make sure they are the proper kelvin, age, clean the plastic/glass between the lights/water, stop the excel (this can melt weak and/or sensitive plants), increase photoperiod to 10/h/d or if already on 10/h/d increase to 12/h/d, make 25% water changes 3 times a week....you can let the plants float or bury in the substrate-in shallow substrate use a rock on top of the stem to keep it submersed until roots form to anchor.......

Another big reason for planted tank failure is using non-aquatic plants......

so if i have 50/50 light bulbs... can you tell me what the "actinic 420 phosphor" does?
or 50/50 lights are just ripoff? (but my tank looks 2x better than fluorescent alone).

+ i never turn off my light bulb. so its been on 24/7 for about 1 and a half week and yet still my corkscrew val is browning. so turning off my light for at least 12hrs is a must?
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Old 05-30-2011, 07:45 AM   #16 
kumi
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My understanding (after buying a light bulb like yours by accident!!) is that actinic light is for reefs! I switched it out.... The good quality Zoo Med brand light also looks very good. I did like the way the reef light looked, but I read that it does nothing for the plants.

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Old 05-30-2011, 06:37 PM   #17 
BlueHaven
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Oh, thank you for all the information!!!
:D
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Old 05-30-2011, 07:50 PM   #18 
sayurasem
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i c... i researched actinic are for corals.

Simpte wrote:

"For a 29 gallon tank I would have no less than 40 watts for a low tech planted tank. 54/55 Would be better"

I agree with this 100%.

Mr Fish wrote:

"You prob need MINIMUM 2watts/gallon, even for easy plants live Java ferns and stuff. "

No, this is definitely not the case. I have a nice 20 gallon tank with 30W of light, and the Java ferns are looking really good. They don't grow very fast, but that's Java fern for you. It's also growing successfully crypts, anubias, dwarf sag, twisted vallis, and one Echinodorus ozelet.

As for which bulb to choose, most of the aquarium specific bulbs work well. I once bought a normal, very cheap bulb that was the same size as an aquarium-specific bulb, but was much dimmer. Things to avoid:
* actinic, which is sort of dim and blue
* Interpet's "beauty light" which is more for enhancing the color of your fish than providing lots of light that your fish can use
* one that says its primary purpuse is in a marine tank

Ones that are good are:
* any aquarium specific daylight bulb
* Triton bulbs
* any bulb from a reputable company (Arcadia, Hagen, Interpet) that says that it promotes phtosynthesis

About pygmy chain sword: assuming this is the same a E. tenellus, I didn't have much luck growing it in my 2.4 WPG tank which is successfully growing other kinds of sowrds. It isn't dead yet, but it doesn't seem to be growing.


credit to MyraVan from http://www.fishforums.com/forum/aqua...-carbon-2.html
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