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Old 05-03-2012, 07:40 PM   #11 
Micho
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Originally Posted by SarahandOscar View Post
Can't you buy liquid bacteria to cycle a tank in 24 hours? PLEASE FORGIVE me if i'm wrong but i have a friend who was advised to do this and a few fish places have agreed it's fine once all the ammonia, nitrate, nitrite and ph levels are fine? She has not added fish yet as this was last weekend so i don't have solid experience BUT we tested the water last night and everything was perfect water wise?
These bottled bacteria products will not work. Cycling must be done the old fashion way, like the other members have said, fish-in cycle with the poor guy is a better option than him being in a 1/2g tank.

Just get a good testing kit, preferably a liquid one, make sure it has ammonia, nitrItes and nitrAtes.

While doing a fish-in cycle, test the water everyday for ammonia, if ammonia is ever 0.25ppm do a quick water change, same thing with nitrItes, check nitrAtes once in awhile, once there's no ammonia and nitrItes, and around 20 ~ 40ppm of nitrAtes you're cycled.
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Old 05-03-2012, 07:45 PM   #12 
Tamyu
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Liquid bacteria doesn't really help your tank to cycle. It is a different variety of bacteria that floats in the water and processes ammonia and nitrites... It doesn't usually exist at levels high enough to support a tank.

What happens when you put the liquid bacteria in is a short term processing of waste. The variety of bacteria used doesn't survive well in a tank for very long - it will, however, survive well in a bottle until you use it. When you put it in the tank, it does it's thing and then dies away. The type of bacteria that you need to have living in your tank for it to be properly cycled cannot survive without a flow of "food" and oxygen. So it is impossible to bottle.

If you just put the water in and the liquid bacteria in, you are going to have perfect water. There is nothing to dirty it - the water is perfectly clean to begin with. "Perfect" water does not mean cycled. It just means that the water is clean. You could take a cup, plop a super dirty goldfish in it, test right away, and you would have perfect water. It wouldn't last long though. In the same way, you could have a tank set up for a year without any fish and "perfect" water, but it would not be cycled at all.

Liquid bacteria can be a useful tool to help when you are cycling, but it alone does not cycle the tank. It is sort of like a stop gap product. It will help keep the ammonia and nitrites a bit lower as long as you are dosing it... But it won't actually establish a colony in your tank. Hopefully a real cycle will happen before you empty the bottle... On the other hand, it could harm the cycle in the long run as it eats the waste too every time you dose the tank - so it reduces the amount of food available to the real cycling bacteria. That doesn't grow as much, so once you stop dosing the liquid there is a spike that could kill your fish.

Personally, I would just do a normal fish in cycle and spend the money on a testing kit instead of liquid bacteria. You are going to have to be testing and changing the water anyway - sure, the liquid might make the cycle "softer", but it won't actually make it faster or easier.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:03 PM   #13 
SweetNightmare
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Mine had fish in it for a week before testing and the water was perfect still. Every test since has been perfect. Plants plus bottled bacteria was my magic cure.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:08 PM   #14 
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I guess i'll do a cycle with him in it, Does anybody know the chances of him getting sick?
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:18 PM   #15 
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As long as you keep the ammonia level down (as I said before, change the water if you get a .25 ppm or .50 (max) reading), your fish should be fine. My tank has been cycling for four weeks now, and my betta hasn't had any issues.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:34 PM   #16 
SarahandOscar
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[quote=Tamyu;1068478]Liquid bacteria doesn't really help your tank to cycle. It is a different variety of bacteria that floats in the water and processes ammonia and nitrites... It doesn't usually exist at levels high enough to support a tank.

Thanks, that actually makes alot of sense, All the differing opinions and methods can be quite overwhelming sometimes, i guess we'll see how my friend goes and at least when i set up my tank i'll be a little more aware of what i'm doing. Thanks heaps :)
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:37 PM   #17 
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If you have lots of healthy live plants that grow fast such as anacharis, a lot of the time these will consume some of the ammonia produced by your livestock, and assist in the cycling process. I cycled my sorority using live plants and did small, regular water changes for the first 3 weeks or so, and I never saw any trace of ammonia.

One betta in a 10 gallon is pretty light stocking. Honestly, the biggest ammonia spike you might see if you lax on water changes is .5-1ppm. I would much rather you put him in the 10 gallon and fish-in cycle it, than keep him in a 1/2 gallon bowl and expose him to temperature and parameter fluctuations for a month.

Bottled bacteria really doesn't work. For bacteria to remain alive in the bottle it needs to be kept constantly refrigerated and even then, it usually consists of the wrong sort of bacteria, which can stall your cycle or give you false readings.

Put your betta in the 10 gallon, buy liquid ammonia, nitrite and nitrate test kits, and check your water daily until you get readings consistent with a cycled tank. For a 10 gallon that means you should be able to go at least a week without a water change, and not see any trace of ammonia or nitrite.

Last edited by LittleBettaFish; 05-03-2012 at 08:40 PM.
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