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Old 05-18-2012, 01:55 PM   #21 
clh101
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I am a rabbit breeder, and I've had rabbits all my life. Do not keep it even if it gets older.
It most likely will survive, but because it's not domesticated it won't work out well. It's natural instinct is still within him. I would bring him to the authorities when he gets within 8 weeks- that's a good age, an age where they can take care of themselves. Please make sure you're feeding him a kitten formula of milk.. it has the nutrients in it. Do not bring it to your vet when older, the vets will NOT know much of what to do but hand it over to a reserve or wildlife sanctuary that will know what to do.

If you want a rabbit look for rabbit breeders in alabama. Depending on what type of rabbit you want, size, etc best to look up on over the 50 breeds there are. Or go to local shelter. You can keep your rabbit OUTSIDE in a hutch btw :) make good compost! Just message me if you have more questions, here to help.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:00 PM   #22 
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Originally Posted by Laki View Post
+1


+1. My rabbit is 5 and a half years old. She gets upset EVERY time I pick her up for grooming. Rabbits ARE NOT an ideal pet for beginners as many believe. And I doubt the vet would spay it for you- it probably wouldn't live long enough to be spayed anyway. Rabbits cost more than many other pets for vet care bc they require a special exotics vet in a lot of states. Small animals are not cats and dogs.

Please don't take a wild bunny.
You're rabbit shouldn't either be upset when you pick it up... it's not adjusted right. I have no problems with my rabbits.. and I've had over 20 at a time. Many vets also don't know how to operate on them, and they are not that much work... Actually really cheap pets. And mine are healthy as can be. They are very good for beginners if you find the right breed and it's been handled well. I've had rabbits live to be over 10 years old with good care. Also depending on breed. I don't spay mine because if you keep them as only rabbit in house.. no reason to spay it? I even clip their own nails! or look into your local 4-H in Alabama, see if they have a rabbit club.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:13 PM   #23 
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+1 to JKFish (if he isn't above me anymore )

Since you seem bent on catching this rabbit, I will give you more warnings to try and convience you that this is a bad idea.

1) Bunnies kick hard enough to break their own backs. If you do not know the proper way to hold a rabbit when you try to "catch" the wild rabbit, then the rabbit can kill itself trying to get out of your arms.

2) If you do manage to pick up the rabbit properly, it will bite you and it will hurt. It is best to only handle a rabbit when it feels like interacting with you and the wild rabbit will not be in the mood to be caught.

3) To my knowledge, a bunny doesn't get weened until the 4th month. I don't know if wild rabbits ween sooner because nature isn't as kind as a livingroom. But, you may be waiting longer than a month.

4) Bunnies can litterally die of frieght. If you manage to pick up a wild rabbit without allowing the rabbit to break it's own back or bite you, if can die of a heart attack as you carry it home.

5) E. Cunnilius is an infection that the mother can pass on to her kits at birth. Even if the baby rabbit you try to catch looks healthy, he/she could be a carrier of this disease that can either show no symptoms or symptoms as sevier as permenant head tilt. The mother can be fine while the bunnies are doomed. It is very expensive to treat and you would need to find a vet with rabbit experience to have any chance of a proper diagnosis.

6) Bunnies have very sensitive digestive systems. If a stressed bunny isn't eating, then that stressed bunny may have a stalled digestive system. Once the digestive system stalls, death follows in a few days. A bunny that is too scared to eat may die.

7) Un-spayed and un-nuetered bunnies spray. I mean they jump in the air and twirl while peeing to mark territory. Spraying can start as early as 8 weeks and once the bunny forms the habit, it is very hard to break.

Also, bunnies are known to pee on their owners to mark them. I think this happens whether they are fixed or not. I'm still reading up on it.

8) The vet you bring the wild rabbit to may refuse to fix the rabbit because it is very difficult to operate on rabbits. The anesthetics are different. You can't fast bunnies because of the way their digestive system functions. You can't put one of those cone things on them because they have to be able to reach and eat their cepals (spelling?). A vet without experience won't even atempt an operation even if it is a simple spay/nueter.

In short,

I was not kinding earlier when I said basic rabbit care is too indepth to smash into a single forum post. Even this post got a bit long and I'm only telling you the scary stuff. The websites I listed in my earlier response are a good start if you are serious about adopting a bunny. I've been planning for bunnies for about a year now because the more I researched, the more I realized jumping form fish care to bunny care would be a huge leap. It is best to leave the wild rabbit in the wild, do more research on rabbit care, and then adopt a domestic rabbit when you are properly prepared to care for a mammal that will easily live for 15+ years.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:18 PM   #24 
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Originally Posted by clh101 View Post
You're rabbit shouldn't either be upset when you pick it up... it's not adjusted right. I have no problems with my rabbits.. and I've had over 20 at a time. Many vets also don't know how to operate on them, and they are not that much work... Actually really cheap pets. And mine are healthy as can be. They are very good for beginners if you find the right breed and it's been handled well. I've had rabbits live to be over 10 years old with good care. Also depending on breed. I don't spay mine because if you keep them as only rabbit in house.. no reason to spay it? I even clip their own nails! or look into your local 4-H in Alabama, see if they have a rabbit club.
Really? I heard that female rabbits have very high instances of ovarian and Uterine cancer when they aren't spayed. Not to mention the male rabbits who end up with testicular cancer if they aren't nuetered. I understand a breeder not fixing his rabbits, but I figured a bunny pet owner should always get a bunny fixed.

But if reported cancer rates in rabbits are infallated, then ignore me.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:24 PM   #25 
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Snowy Surface... I'm not a guy XD
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:27 PM   #26 
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I'm going to be completely blunt here, it is not intended as rude, but it might come across that way anyway!
I don't care what you want to do, I don't care what you think you're going to do, DON'T BOTHER!!!You will kill the rabbit, Most likely from the stress that YOU are going to cause carrying out this crazy plan.I don't care if you think that using your hands instead of a trap will be better, it will be just as bad!Leave things where they belong, if you want a pet then go to a shelter or a pet store and get a DOMESTICATED one!One that has grown up in a house, NOT in the nearest field.It is not fair for the bunny, or the mother, as said before you will hear the bunny scream as it is lifted away from the ground, you know why?Because that is where it belongs, and it doesn't want to leave!!!Again I don't mean to be rude but it probably came across that way because I was being so blunt.I say this for the good of the rabbit, not just to be rude.
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Old 05-18-2012, 04:14 PM   #27 
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If you really have to get a rabbit, get a domesticated one. You'll be much happier with the result in the end.
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Old 05-18-2012, 04:44 PM   #28 
clh101
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Originally Posted by SnowySurface View Post
Really? I heard that female rabbits have very high instances of ovarian and Uterine cancer when they aren't spayed. Not to mention the male rabbits who end up with testicular cancer if they aren't nuetered. I understand a breeder not fixing his rabbits, but I figured a bunny pet owner should always get a bunny fixed.

But if reported cancer rates in rabbits are infallated, then ignore me.
I in all my times of raising, and breeding rabbits to SHOW them.. Yes I show them. Have NEVER heard of that... they are not prone to that. Another reason even if I was a pet owner, I don't want a vet touching my rabbit because MANY are not trained nor specialized into rabbits. They feed many false information to rabbit owners.

I treat my own rabbits, and know many tricks to treating rabbit diseases. The head tilt disease, it's common, but ONLY if they come in contact with another rabbit with it. If a rabbit gets a digestive problem, stalled/blockage you feed them Pumpkin Pure from the can- 100% pumpkin. Best trick :)

Male rabbits will spray once in awhile... I don't have issues with spraying. They do not pee on you to mark territory... I have baby bunnies pee on me! It's natural. They aren't something you can train like a dog to go outside and pee... If they pee, oh well! No matter with it, bodily function :)

I really hate people giving other people false information with rabbits... They are a great pet if you know how to take care of them.
But yes, if a rabbit does get frighten they can easily break their own backs.
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Old 05-18-2012, 05:03 PM   #29 
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I cannot emphasis the importance of the following paragraph enough:

I've bred and raised rabbits. Had 30-40 at a time. Under no circumstances should you EVER do this. They are WILD rabbits. Not domesticated. Even if you were to find a newborn wild rabbit and raise it yourself, it WILL grow into a WILD rabbit. It will never be domesticated. It will never be a pet. It would be a disservice to those rabbits if you were to catch one. Just admire them from afar. Take pictures. But DON'T CATCH THEM. It will not turn out well for you or the rabbit. Let them be what they were born to be: WILD.
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Old 05-18-2012, 05:06 PM   #30 
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And yes, as someone astutely observed in an earlier post, those babies could die of a heart attack. Rabbits are prone to it. Pick a wild baby up and it will emit a disturbing and heart-wrenching scream. Yes, I mean scream in every sense of the word. Because it's terrified.
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