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Old 07-27-2012, 05:10 PM   #1 
mkayum
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I'm cycling my 5 gal tank ...

I'm cycling my 5 gallon tank for my favorite betta, Unicorn. It's for my room so Unicorn would "guard" or watch my room for me lol.


I added a driftwood and a few java ferns... I also added Petco black sand and some gravels for java ferns. I plan to buy testing kits to make sure my tank are safe for my Unicorn. I do change the water about 10 percent daily. I just started it two days ago. My filter for my 5 gal is 10 gallon sponge filter.


However, I was wondering if I would add a bunch of ghost shrimps or a couple of otocinclus or a bamboo shrimp as the cleaning crew...


Any advice will be greatly appreciated!



P.S
No I do not want any snails even apple or mystery in my tank. I used to have them and I never had a good luck of keeping them alive. :(


Here's the photo of my 5 gal tank


Last edited by mkayum; 07-27-2012 at 05:16 PM.
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Old 07-27-2012, 05:25 PM   #2 
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You could add a few ghost shrimp if you want, but not the oto...Too much bioload.
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Old 07-27-2012, 08:23 PM   #3 
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Personally, I like snails better. Mine are live bearing and I find a new baby almost every day . But between shrimp and otos - shrimp would be better, I think. I have been told otos need 30 gallons? The downside to shrimp is the betta might see them as a snack. Supposingly they have a very small bioload?Oh wait, you said bamboo shrimp..they are the big ones, right? The only thing I know about them is they are filter feeders and need a fairly strong current

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Old 07-27-2012, 08:26 PM   #4 
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double posted
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:34 AM   #5 
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The only other things you could really put in here are shrimp...although many bettas just see shrimp as a tasty snack, so keep an eye!
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:05 AM   #6 
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The tank is too small for other fish life in my opinion. The above advice is golden, though. One thing I'd like to add, if I may, is I noticed your java fern roots/rhizome is buried. Java ferns need to have their rhizome (a long, thick root from which all other roots grow from) above the substrate or it will cause rot and the plant will die. Java ferns are often attached to driftwood or ornaments, it can also be left floating :)
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:15 AM   #7 
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Thanks! Oh what about cory...?
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:17 AM   #8 
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Corydoras catfish prefer to be in schools of at least six and therefore wouldn't be suitable for a tank of five gallons, usually ten gallons is recommended for them as they scuttle around the bottom of the tank and like a large footprint. It's also recommended that they have a sand substrate as gravel can harbour bacteria that erodes their barbles.
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:21 AM   #9 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpookyTooth View Post
The tank is too small for other fish life in my opinion. The above advice is golden, though. One thing I'd like to add, if I may, is I noticed your java fern roots/rhizome is buried. Java ferns need to have their rhizome (a long, thick root from which all other roots grow from) above the substrate or it will cause rot and the plant will die. Java ferns are often attached to driftwood or ornaments, it can also be left floating :)

Thanks for the advice! I already uprooted the java ferns like you said, above the substrate. This photo was taken two days ago lol.

I was wondering what kind of low light or moderate plants that would grow in the sand?


I'll update the photos later.


Thanks again! (:
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:32 AM   #10 
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You're welcome! Glad I can help :)

There are all sorts of stem plants that I use and love that seem to grow really well in low-light conditions. As long as the bulb you use is the right colour spectrum (5000k to 6700k, usually written on the box as "bright white" or "cool white") and you have the right wattage (I think 11 to 14watts is fine for low light plants in a five gallon but that is just my opinion) you shouldn't have many problems.

I like ludwigia repens, water wisteria (gorgeous plant, if any green foliage comes loose don't throw it, leave it to float and it'll likely sprout roots and can be planted later on), rotala rotundifolia (I haven't planted mine yet, just received it but I've read good things), ergia densa (I think it's also known as anarchias? I'm not sure) and some hygrophila and cabomba. Species specific research can be very beneficial as some cabomba are rather tricky.

I cannot recommend water wisteria enough though, mine seem to love sand. On that note the sand you have looks like really good stuff but it may be worth poking it with a stick or something every now and then to prevent gas pockets building up.

I'm aware you aren't keen on having snails but if you do ever change your mind Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS) are very handy to use in tanks with sand, they keep it moving and prevent anaerobic pockets. They also eat dying leaf litter and algae. They shouldn't overrun your tank if you ensure not to overfeed and keep maintenance up but they (in my experience) have a much smaller bioload than other snails.
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