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Old 08-06-2012, 09:20 AM   #1 
fairy74
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What are my females doing?

Sorry if this sounds a silly question.

I have four female bettas in a 7 gallon tank for several months now.
They are all getting along just fine...two in particular pretty much stay together(no aggresion at all just play in the bubbles and swim at each others side)today they are flaring and circling each other and rubbing tails,i would assume this is some kind of mating ritual but they are both identical.

Is this normal?
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Old 08-06-2012, 09:46 AM   #2 
shellieca
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Sorry if this sounds a silly question.

I have four female bettas in a 7 gallon tank for several months now.
They are all getting along just fine...two in particular pretty much stay together(no aggresion at all just play in the bubbles and swim at each others side)today they are flaring and circling each other and rubbing tails,i would assume this is some kind of mating ritual but they are both identical.

Is this normal?
IMO, your tank is too small for 4 Bettas & they are now showing aggression towards each other. It can happen. Somebody else may have a different opinion. I have two that have together from day 1, started in a 10g tank & have been moved to a 46g. They are ALWAYS together, but occasionally one will flare & chase the other, they are able to escape each other because I have lots of plants & hidey holes. Then they are best friends again. Go figure.
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:01 AM   #3 
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The girls are being moved to my 29 gallon in a few days.

Its weird because they dont nip or anything
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:42 AM   #4 
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Body slapping can be a sign of dominance play.. I have to agree, that many fish in a 7 gallon isn't idea. The point of having multiple females is to give them options to spread out aggression and they need room to be away from one another as needed, which can only happen in a larger tank.
Nipping isn't the only sign of aggression, unfortunately we only know a small fraction of their "language", but body slapping tends to be a sign of comparing each other's size/strength before a fight.

Males tend to have longer ventral fins.. usually about twice the length of a female's, along with a larger beard. It's quit common to find a male plakat in a tank full of females at the store due to mass breeders having too many fish to catch those mistakes. But normally when a male shows any dominance to a group of females, the male tends to pay for it with bites all over. Silly fish.
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Old 08-06-2012, 05:24 PM   #5 
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It's not a mating ritual, that's a sign they're about to fight.

Once you see them flaring and circling, fins will start getting ripped off.

Now that you just put the 6 cories in the 29G cycled tank without a qt period I'm not sure what to suggest.
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Old 08-06-2012, 05:44 PM   #6 
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Yeah bettas can be very subtle in showing aggression/dominance. My wild bettas are masters at it. Sometimes all it takes is a certain look from a more dominant fish for a submissive to stripe up.

Most times, there is no physical contact between them, but I think it is the behaviour of the weaker fish that dictates whether there is going to be a fight or not. I find if a fish yields to the aggressor there tends not to be anything more serious than a quick chase. However, if the weaker fish refuses to back down, then this is when more serious fights break out.

Your females are more than likely sizing each other up. It's perfectly normal behaviour in a sorority, but it is something you keep eyes on.
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Old 08-07-2012, 05:13 AM   #7 
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It's not a mating ritual, that's a sign they're about to fight.

Once you see them flaring and circling, fins will start getting ripped off.

Now that you just put the 6 cories in the 29G cycled tank without a qt period I'm not sure what to suggest.
To QT fish is not something i have ever done or been advised to do before...i just got told to float the bag for 20 minutes.

I know the fish are QT for a period at the lps if that makes a difference.
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Old 08-07-2012, 07:11 AM   #8 
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After going over most of the posts in this forum

I would highly recommend the QT in the future. When you first mentioned you just acclimated, them I was sort of in shock, due to the amount of time and energy you put into cycling.

I don't usually trust what the people at the LFS say UNLESS I know about their background & the type of tanks they keep because their goal is to sell you something. For most stores, QT is ONLY done if the fish look SICK. Otherwise they just acclimate them and then add them to the general population in the tank.

It's much easier for the stores to sell you a sick fish, and more profitable for them when you return to buy medication to treat it.

You can go ask the people at the store, but unless you are specific about it they probably won't mention the need to QT fish. Even the suggestion that you would need a period of 2 weeks to QT would deter most IMPULSIVE people from buying fish, since everyone wants things done NOW.

When I first bought home guppies to rebuild my population the betta decimated, I didn't QT them and the original guppy in my tank ended up dying after the first week. I still have 1 guppy left from the original 5, but she has some genetic deformity.

Also with most fish diseases, they can be easily spread by using contaminated fish nets, cleaning accessories, and other tank equipment.

Most places may soak their nets in some sort of antiseptic solution over night, but that's just a guess. I'm pretty sure they do NOT sanitize their nets unless there was a major outbreak.

Since I brought back the original 3 bettas, I've been more cautious & done more research on the species. I don't want to have to replace one of them over something stupid that was totally preventable. The entire section of disease & emergencies are chock full of one example after another of why QT should be part of the routine whenever you buy a new fish/plant.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:35 AM   #9 
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Originally Posted by MSG View Post
I would highly recommend the QT in the future. When you first mentioned you just acclimated, them I was sort of in shock, due to the amount of time and energy you put into cycling.

I don't usually trust what the people at the LFS say UNLESS I know about their background & the type of tanks they keep because their goal is to sell you something. For most stores, QT is ONLY done if the fish look SICK. Otherwise they just acclimate them and then add them to the general population in the tank.

It's much easier for the stores to sell you a sick fish, and more profitable for them when you return to buy medication to treat it.

You can go ask the people at the store, but unless you are specific about it they probably won't mention the need to QT fish. Even the suggestion that you would need a period of 2 weeks to QT would deter most IMPULSIVE people from buying fish, since everyone wants things done NOW.

When I first bought home guppies to rebuild my population the betta decimated, I didn't QT them and the original guppy in my tank ended up dying after the first week. I still have 1 guppy left from the original 5, but she has some genetic deformity.

Also with most fish diseases, they can be easily spread by using contaminated fish nets, cleaning accessories, and other tank equipment.

Most places may soak their nets in some sort of antiseptic solution over night, but that's just a guess. I'm pretty sure they do NOT sanitize their nets unless there was a major outbreak.

Since I brought back the original 3 bettas, I've been more cautious & done more research on the species. I don't want to have to replace one of them over something stupid that was totally preventable. The entire section of disease & emergencies are chock full of one example after another of why QT should be part of the routine whenever you buy a new fish/plant.
I COMPLETELY agree. The LFS employees do NOT typically have as much knowledge as they lead us to believe. The best defense is to do lots of research before going, then when you talk the LFS employee you'll know if they know what they're talking about or not. A QT tank does NOT have to be huge since its temporary & it does not have to be fully decorated.
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:22 AM   #10 
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QTing new fish is always the best choice. It's not one that we necessarily like because, who wants to wait 2+ weeks to put their new pretty fish in the tank? But it is the more ideal way to go.

Also, you don't want to just "float the bag for 20 minutes" either, as that is only half the step of acclimating them- floating will get the temperatures even, but you have to also adjust them to the new chemistry of your tank. Without doing so, you are putting your fish at a high risk of going into os shock because I guarantee you that your water and the tank water at the store won't have the same chemistry.
To safely acclimate them to the new chemistry you will want to remove part of the water in the bag/cup and replace it with water from the tank making sure that the bagged water does not enter into your tank. You can do this by using a small cup to dip out the water from the bag, or gently pour some of the water from the bag into a cup. And just use another cup to scoop water into the bag.
You will have to do that process a few times during the 20-30 minutes they are floating.
A lot of people don't do this, but then a lot of times they end up with a fish that goes into shock and dies within hours of introduction and then wonders why the fish died.
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