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Old 08-22-2012, 06:51 PM   #1 
Megalechis
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Question Multiple Bettas

As purely theoretical questions;

How big do you think an aquarium would need to be to house more than one male?
A male and female in the same aquarium? (Without counting in breeding risk factors - assuming the population is somehow controlled.)

Questions of approximate territory purely.
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:08 PM   #2 
Orito
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I make no assumption of knowing these facts, but...
In the wild, while there is an abundance of space, there are multiple betta's, even multiple males. I would assume size of the betta's themselves would be an issue.

Having stated that, I'm sure there's a technique to it, but my guess would be 20g+.
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:28 PM   #3 
homegrown terror
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you can do it very comfortably in a 10g with a divider, but i get the impression you're looking to house them "together" together. this is something you should NEVER do. even if you find particularly docile fish, would you really want to risk an unpredictable episode killing one or both of your fish? yes, in the wild bettas can be seen together sometimes, but this is not an ideal status for them, they will try to avoid each other. also remember, domesticated bettas have been bred for hundreds of years as fighting animals, and are therefore a lot more aggressive than their wild counterparts. can you picture yourself trying to throw a tennis ball to a pack of wolves just because you can do it with your dog? then don't expect the same behavior out of domesticated bettas as you would from wild bettas.

sorry if i sound harsh, but it's a common pitfall of many owners to think "maybe my fish are the exception" and then end up with a tragedy on their hands.
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:57 PM   #4 
Megalechis
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Note the word theoretical, please.
I'm not saying my fish is an exception. I'm curious on sizes, no matter how large that size has to be.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:02 PM   #5 
kfryman
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In theory it can't be done, boom! There's your answer. Male bettas will seek out and kill the other. So there is no tank size.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:02 PM   #6 
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well then a 20 g so each can have a 10 gallon space ratio with dividers and then divide them by 4 g each if you wish. with again dividers.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:03 PM   #7 
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Sorry i meant the divide the 10g into 5g
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:05 PM   #8 
Mo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kfryman View Post
In theory it can't be done, boom! There's your answer. Male bettas will seek out and kill the other. So there is no tank size.
how do you think it happens in the wild? male bettas dont seek eachother out. they establish a territory in theory about 3 x 3 feet wide.. the reason they get into fights is because of territory. you make it seem like they actually look for other males to fight.. they o=fight because they are either trying to find territory.. or protect one.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:09 PM   #9 
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No smaller than 20 gallons to keep a male with a sorority.
Two males, or a male with females, it's less tank size and more along the lines of temperament of the fish. I know OFL has multiple males with multiple females, she has bred aggression out of her fish, which allows more males to live together... However I do know of people that have done a sorority with a male with all unrelated pet store fish as well. Darkmoon17 has done this plenty of times, she's sort of the expert in that field. And it doesn't always work out, many males can never live with a group of girls. Not sure if anyone's ever kept multiple pet store males together (probably not..), but we have another breeder on this site right now that has multiple males they bred themselves living together.

No, not condoning that everyone should go out and try this.. but it's completely possible if you know what you are doing.

Wild betta are very different from splendens. Wild betta do not fight to the death, even our fancier fish still come from lines bred for aggression.
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Old 08-22-2012, 08:14 PM   #10 
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I disagree. My wild betta males seek each other out in my aquariums. They are less aggressive than splendens, as they are of a different complex all together, but the aggression is still there and I have seen some pretty extensive fin damage because of it.

However, splendens are a completely different ball game. I have had a male who was horribly beaten up and even then he was still trying to get through the divider to continue fighting. The level of aggression shown by the males towards each other means I would never recommend housing multiple males together.

Whenever I see most peoples aquariums (even quite large tanks) where they are supposedly 'successfully' housing males together the males always look stressed, or ratty or have big chunks taken out of their fins.

You cannot compare domesticated splendens in any shape or form to true wild fish. That aggressiveness has been selected for generations now, and is still present even in pet and show bettas.

I had two females in a quite large and heavily planted tank hunt each other down and fight until I had to separate them. I could imagine two males would be very similar, no matter how large the tank. Trouble is with domesticated splendens, most will tend not to back down in a fight whereas in the wild the loser would more than likely flee.

You would probably have more success at keeping a male and female pair together long-term. I have a male who I think would do fine in a set-up like that as he is a very gentle spawner and I have never witnessed him be particularly violent towards a female. However, even then I would want the tank well-planted as after spawning males will attack and could possibly kill a female if there is not enough space to get away.

The top part was to Mo. Olympia snuck in between haha
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