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Old 10-06-2012, 10:21 AM   #1 
agunn1231
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Not sure where else to put this

So I've come to find myself in a bit of a pickle. As I am most likely moving in late December/early January. Now normally that wouldn't be an issue, but in the last few years I have lived here not only have I taken up betta fish as hobby, but also growing and caring for carnivorous plants known as Nepethes or Tropical Pitcher plants. Now i won't be facing the main issue here until a few months from now, but because My hobbies include things that like warm tropical climates, moving in the heart of winter probably isnt the best thing for them but I don't have many other options. Especially when you take into consideration that i live in Colorado, and that it snowed a little bit yesterday already. I don't want to put my plants or my fish in the way of harm transporting them with these cold temperatures. I think that since I am currently cycling my tank, I could keep supplementing the ammonia to it until after I move(still gotta figure out how to move everything from it without crashing the cycle). But I'm not sure what to do with my plants, one of them is a four foot tall monstrosity of a Nep that I got last year that was already growing slowly as it was almost dead when I got it. That's not the case now as it has taken off and is growing exceptionally well. But as I said a moment ago I do not want to harm the plant. So any word from you lovely folks about how I could safely move these things. Do any of you have experience moving with tanks that are up and running or with monstorsities of plants?
Oh and on a side note, I suck at planning, because when i started cycling my tank and most definitely when I took up the carnivorous plant hobby, moving was the last thing on my mind, but now here I am a couple months away from moving and I realized I didnt think things through, silly me.
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:23 AM   #2 
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When moving fish it can become overwhelming, there are several things that you can do to help with the added pressure.

SHIPPING!
I know it sounds odd but this is how fish are actually transported to stores and personal purchases. Here is a simple Guide to help if this is the route you choose.

This is best if you're moving several hundred miles.

Buckets
Buckets with lids are the best transportation tools for fish, you can insulate them with foam or fiber glass and have your fish have a heated journey to you destination.

For your plants they can have a similar style of transport but instead of keeping them in a bucket of water, which can be heavy, you can put them in between some newspaper and drench the paper with water. This will keep the plants moist and resist drying out. Aquatic plants will live as long as then stay hydrated, they don't need to be submerged.
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Old 10-06-2012, 11:42 AM   #3 
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Nepenthes are absolutely stunning, unfortunately our local climate doesn't allow me to keep them but I do keep a vast number of Pinguicula species as well as Drosera, Utricularia and Dionaea muscipula. Yay carnivorous plants!

You are right to be concerned about the cold but something I've learned about carnivorous plants is that they can be surprisingly hardy. If you don't mind a little effort you can gently wrap the entire plant (all 4 foot of it!) in cling film (aka saran wrap) and then wrap this in a light towel, keep your plant in a warm spot in your transportation vehicle. If you can find a box large enough you can simply place the plant in the box and fill it with packing peanuts. You do run the risk of damaging leaves and pitchers but this damage will only be minor and of course 4 feet is a huge amount to keep in a car.

I will say that while the cold may also do minor damage to your Nepenthes you will likely find that it will have to acclimatize to its new environment anyway so it may drop its pitchers or slow growth for a while. A night or two in the cold won't do it any harm, people have shipped these in the winter before. If possible you can try to get heat packs or hand warmers and keep these in close proximity but otherwise there isn't much you can do except for pack it carefully.

While I know it's not the best way to go about it have you considered pruning the plant? I know that with other carnivorous plants you can trim them back (or remove leaves) if they get too much and replant these and they'll grow but I'm not sure if Nepenthes respond in the same way. You may need rooting hormone if you aren't taking a basal stalk.

Will you be taking a car or something? If you can keep the plant in a tall box it'll be fine for a couple of days.
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:14 PM   #4 
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Im taking a car. Luckily im not moving too far, maybe 45 minutes from where i am now. I was considering trimming the nep back a bit, but am sceptical as it was so damaged when i got it. its looking much better now( i attached a picture of him, the bracket on the wall is sittitng at just over 4 feet off the ground, so the height of the plant is an estimate. i decided to vine the plant because my apartment doesnt have any decent studs for hanging plants, this only one bracket in the wall..i was gonna put a shelf there to help supplement light.)
AS for moving the tank and everything, my girlfriend suggested buckets as well, but i figured i would ask here too. so having another vote for buckets is promising.
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:19 PM   #5 
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Good... grief... is it flowering?! That is incredible, I've rarely seen Nepenthes flower let alone without being in a greenhouse! I can see why you're concerned, that is an absolutely gorgeous plant and I know I'd be devastated if anything happened to it if I had something like that.

Really, I think the only thing you can do is try to take the plant with the bracket in the car somewhere. Wrap the pot in something to stop soil going everywhere and hope that someone is willing to cling onto it for dear life. A box would most certainly offer it some support if you can get one.

Beneficial bacteria can apparently survive six hours at most whilst being kept wet so if you don't want to disturb your cycle you can take your filter media and keep it in old fish tank water while you move, then get it into a set up (dechlorinate water before adding it to the tank as chlorine = nono for BB) and monitor closely, dose your ammonia source as soon as you can.

Best of luck with whatever you do!
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:36 PM   #6 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpookyTooth View Post
Good... grief... is it flowering?! That is incredible, I've rarely seen Nepenthes flower let alone without being in a greenhouse! I can see why you're concerned, that is an absolutely gorgeous plant and I know I'd be devastated if anything happened to it if I had something like that.

Really, I think the only thing you can do is try to take the plant with the bracket in the car somewhere. Wrap the pot in something to stop soil going everywhere and hope that someone is willing to cling onto it for dear life. A box would most certainly offer it some support if you can get one.

Beneficial bacteria can apparently survive six hours at most whilst being kept wet so if you don't want to disturb your cycle you can take your filter media and keep it in old fish tank water while you move, then get it into a set up (dechlorinate water before adding it to the tank as chlorine = nono for BB) and monitor closely, dose your ammonia source as soon as you can.

Best of luck with whatever you do!
Thank you. I was so surprised when it flowered. when i got the plant it was almost dead. it was knocked down from $75 to $25, all the tendrils were dried up and it had a few leaves that were green. Then it surprised me in the middle of winter by putting out a pitcher on my birthday...then boomed with growth, and is last month put out two flowers in the course of a week or so. I had a picture of him wehn i got him on my phone but i seem to have deleted it. maybe its hiding somewhere.
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:37 PM   #7 
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That's an incredible deal, goes to show how tough some of the carnivorous plant genera are. Gosh, I was recently shown a photograph of a Dionaea muscipula that had been trapped in the mail for over a month that survived somehow. Didn't look good, sure, but it was alive. These things are so hardy it's unbelievable.
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Old 10-06-2012, 12:51 PM   #8 
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indeed they are. but i still want to take care when moving him. the rest of my nepenthes and my dionaea are all managable enough size to move no problem...but this one...it just got out of hand.
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Old 10-06-2012, 01:09 PM   #9 
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someone on a carnivorous plant forum suggested i put the nep unto a dishpack or a wardrobe box and move it that way. As for the tank. As you suggested, SpookyTooth, i think that keeping the filter media moist and maybe the silk plants too(since i think there are BB living on them) would be the lightest option, as the place that i am most likely going to be moving to doesnt have an elevator, and the apartemnts are all atleast 1 story off the ground.
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Old 10-06-2012, 01:13 PM   #10 
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Sounds like a plan to me, just a shame about the lack of elevatorage. The vast majority of the beneficial bacteria will be in the filter sponge but keeping the silk plants wet won't do any harm (maybe keep them in zip-lock bags with some water).
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