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Old 11-27-2012, 10:19 AM   #21 
soady
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Originally Posted by DoctorWhoLuver View Post
I agree with Phaydra it's a bad idea, even for breeding. That is not an adequate tank. Have you even been conditioning?
I don't use any water conditioner. I use tap water which I let stand in for 2-3 days before I actually use it. I don't have a heater nor anything similar. They are fine. Happy, eating, active... I think you give too much credit to all the equipment. I see a lot of people having troubles with their bettas under perfect conditions (huge tanks, heaters, etc.) and my only problem was leaving my windows open for too long once (when my male got clamped fins). While they were together they would usually be at the opposite side of the bowl, and whenever one of them would slowly come close to the other they didn't fight, just moved along. Also, he was building bubble nests then while he hasn't made a single bubble nest since I divided them.
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:24 AM   #22 
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You look up conditioning for breeding, because that is the wrong type.
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:38 AM   #23 
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Originally Posted by DoctorWhoLuver View Post
You look up conditioning for breeding, because that is the wrong type.
Most people recommend only to keep their water clean and feed them nutritious food. What exactly is the wrong type? The fact that I'm not putting all kinds of water conditioners? Why would I if everything is fine?
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:41 AM   #24 
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Dear Soady, please listen to the advice above, though they come as blunt and can sometimes seem rude, they mean well.

As a person who doesn't have much of a regular budget, listen to what I have to say.

The min. space for a betta is arguable between 1-2 gallons, but even that isn't much, Veiltails seem to have less trouble in those containers as they have less finnage than let's say the fancy halfmoon betta.

But it's only enough space for a single betta and not two, it's hardly enough room for 1 betta and a snail/shrimp. They live in their toilets, therefore they need that amount of space to poop and for the water to remain clean.

It is not recommended at all to house two bettas in 1 gallon even if they are a different sex because it is said that females can end up shredding up the male or viceversa, like it happened to you, even reputable breeders pull out their females after the breeding has been done and do not house them together. Regardless the amount of hiding spaces, which is limited in a 1 gallon, one of them will get nipped.

Most people who wish to have more than 1 betta in the same tank have at least +10 gallon heavily planted tanks. Or dividers in a +5 gallon tank. And then the getting along part is all about luck and your betta's personality

None of which I recommend unless you gain a bit more experience on betta care, because it has many cons like spreading of diseases--

Water conditioner is needed. There is chlorine in our tap water, it doesn't matter how long you let it sit, there's still chemicals there and it won't dissapate like magic. Aging water with conditioner is the right way to do this, you have to think that water goes under a treatment to make it human consumable, and we do not want fish swimming in our potable water or algae growing in our pipes, therefore all the chemicals they put in. That it doesn't harm us doesn't mean it won't harm the fish because in the natural world, chlorine is not present in water

If you care for your bettas as I can see you are trying to help them, please get Aquarium salt, order it online or find another store if possible, and i'm not sure if the aloe gel is a good idea, but you can buy API stress coat, which is a rather cheap conditioner containing aloe vera in it made especially for fish.

Usually when getting a betta fish it's recommended to have a first aid kit to fight against the common betta diseases:

- Aquarium salt
- Epsom salt
- Antiparasitic medicine
- Anti fungal medicine
- Anti bacterial medicine

As for a thermometre and heater, a thermometre is a must, temperature fluctuations is what makes a betta get sick, and this little device helps you watch for them, they cost 1$-3$?? 3 euro in my case, surely you can spare that amount of money.

The heater can be excluded if your house is hot enough and not placed near windows or drafty areas. But mind that bettas can only tolerate stable temperatures between 75-82F.

Water changes in a 1 gallon must be performed bi-weekly with 50% and 100% changes, the 100% is necessary to eliminate all the harmful ammonia and waste properly that accumulates fast in a small container.

Also don't believe the employees or shop owners as much, sometimes they know less or have been misinformed about the care of an animal, thus why sometimes we see sick pets in display, especially bettas.

And if you intend to breed you need a 10+gallon with tannined water and a HEATER is a must, adults are durable but fry are very delicate creatures, also you have to be ready to house over 100 baby bettas, and have small live foods like baby brine shrimp as they cannot eat dehydrated food.

Therefore I think you should hold off breeding until you keep the bettas a while longer, and learn from the experience and get the proper equipment needed. You also have to think what do you intend to do with over 100 betta fry afterwards. When people buy bettas from breeders, they buy it for genetics mainly.

As for your problem:

It looks to me that your betta is having fin melt, which is another type or Fin rot, which is more agressive, it could be caused by stress, bad water conditions, and such.

First thing you should know that it is caused by bacteria, so using Medicine is the best thing to do, using tri-sulfa or tetracycline as quickly as possible. Apparently potassium permanganate baths work well, but can be stressful on the fish and MUST be performed perfectly and raising the temperature to perhaps 78F. (But you would need a thermometre and heater for that). Make sure that the female isn't showing similar symptoms as I'm sure you are probably sharing nets and such which can get the other female infected as well, especially since you said her fins were injured.

Last edited by asukabetta; 11-27-2012 at 10:54 AM.
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:45 AM   #25 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asukabetta View Post
Dear Soady, please listen to the advice above, though they come as blunt and can sometimes seem rude, they mean well.

As a person who doesn't have much of a regular budget, listen to what I have to say.

The min. space for a betta is arguable between 1-2 gallons, but even that isn't much, Veiltails seem to have less trouble in those containers as they have less finnage than let's say the fancy halfmoon betta.

But it's only enough space for a single betta and not two, it's hardly enough room for 1 betta and a snail-shrimp. They live in their toilets, therefore they need that amount of space to poop and for the water to remain clean.

It is not recommended at all to house two bettas in 1 gallon even if they are a different sex because it is said that females can end up shredding up the male. Regardless the amount of hiding spaces, which is limited in a 1 gallon, one of them will get nipped.

Most people who wish to have more than 1 betta in the same tank have at least +10 gallon heavily planted tanks. Or dividers in a +5 gallon tank.

None of which I recommend unless you gain a bit more experience on betta care, because it has many cons like spreading of diseases--

If you care for your bettas as I can see you are trying to help them, please get Aquarium salt, order it online or find another store if possible, and i'm not sure if the aloe gel is a good idea, but you can buy API stress coat, which is a rather cheap conditioner containing aloe vera in it made especially for fish.

Usually when getting a betta fish it's recommended to have a first aid kit to fight against the common betta diseases:

- Aquarium salt
- Epsom salt
- Antiparasitic medicine
- Anti fungal medicine
- Anti bacterial medicine

As for a thermometre and heater, a thermometre is a must, temperature fluctuations is what makes a betta get sick. The heater can be excluded if your house is hot enough. But mind that bettas can only tolerate stable temperatures between 75-82F.

Water changes in a 1 gallon must be performed bi-weekly with 50% and 100% changes, the 100% is necessary to eliminate all the harmful ammonia and waste properly that accumulates fast in a small container.

Also don't believe the employees or shop owners as much, sometimes they knows less or have been misinformed about the care of an animal, thus why sometimes we see sick pets in display, especially bettas.

And if you intend to breed you need a 10+gallon with tannined water and a HEATER is a must, adults are durable but fry are very delicate creatures, also you have to be ready to house over 100 baby bettas, and have small live foods like baby brine shrimp as they cannot eat dehydrated food.

Therefore I think you should hold off breeding until you keep the bettas a while longer, and learn from the experience and get the proper equipment needed.

As for your problem:

It looks to me that your betta is having fin melt, which is another type or Fin rot, which is more agressive, it could be caused by stress, bad water conditions, and such.

First thing you should know that it is caused by bacteria, so using Aquarium salt (not table salt--) is the best thing to do and raising the temperature to perhaps 78F. (But you would need a thermometre and heater for that). Make sure that the female isn't showing similar symptoms as I'm sure you are probably sharing nets and such which can get the other female infected as well, especially since you said her fins were injured.

If it gets worse using medicine to fight against fin rot would be best. Without overdosing, and proper temperature management.
+++1^
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:51 AM   #26 
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Females will eat the young and possibly kill the male to do so, or the male will kill her to keep her from eating them. Please keep this in mind.
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:57 AM   #27 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettanewbie60 View Post
+++1^
thanks :) I just editted some parts because I forgot to mention the importance of water conditioner, so Soady please read the original post and not the quote :)
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:58 AM   #28 
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i dont think shes gonna listen~
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Old 11-27-2012, 11:03 AM   #29 
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Originally Posted by aokashi View Post
i dont think shes gonna listen~
I am willing to give anyone the benefit of the doubt, I hope she/he does, betta's are amazing creatures, and those bettas looked great it would be a shame... :(
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Old 11-27-2012, 11:16 AM   #30 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asukabetta View Post
Dear Soady, please listen to the advice above, though they come as blunt and can sometimes seem rude, they mean well.

As a person who doesn't have much of a regular budget, listen to what I have to say.

The min. space for a betta is arguable between 1-2 gallons, but even that isn't much, Veiltails seem to have less trouble in those containers as they have less finnage than let's say the fancy halfmoon betta.

But it's only enough space for a single betta and not two, it's hardly enough room for 1 betta and a snail-shrimp. They live in their toilets, therefore they need that amount of space to poop and for the water to remain clean.

It is not recommended at all to house two bettas in 1 gallon even if they are a different sex because it is said that females can end up shredding up the male. Regardless the amount of hiding spaces, which is limited in a 1 gallon, one of them will get nipped.

Most people who wish to have more than 1 betta in the same tank have at least +10 gallon heavily planted tanks. Or dividers in a +5 gallon tank.

None of which I recommend unless you gain a bit more experience on betta care, because it has many cons like spreading of diseases--

If you care for your bettas as I can see you are trying to help them, please get Aquarium salt, order it online or find another store if possible, and i'm not sure if the aloe gel is a good idea, but you can buy API stress coat, which is a rather cheap conditioner containing aloe vera in it made especially for fish.

Usually when getting a betta fish it's recommended to have a first aid kit to fight against the common betta diseases:

- Aquarium salt
- Epsom salt
- Antiparasitic medicine
- Anti fungal medicine
- Anti bacterial medicine

As for a thermometre and heater, a thermometre is a must, temperature fluctuations is what makes a betta get sick. The heater can be excluded if your house is hot enough. But mind that bettas can only tolerate stable temperatures between 75-82F.

Water changes in a 1 gallon must be performed bi-weekly with 50% and 100% changes, the 100% is necessary to eliminate all the harmful ammonia and waste properly that accumulates fast in a small container.

Also don't believe the employees or shop owners as much, sometimes they knows less or have been misinformed about the care of an animal, thus why sometimes we see sick pets in display, especially bettas.

And if you intend to breed you need a 10+gallon with tannined water and a HEATER is a must, adults are durable but fry are very delicate creatures, also you have to be ready to house over 100 baby bettas, and have small live foods like baby brine shrimp as they cannot eat dehydrated food.

Therefore I think you should hold off breeding until you keep the bettas a while longer, and learn from the experience and get the proper equipment needed.

As for your problem:

It looks to me that your betta is having fin melt, which is another type or Fin rot, which is more agressive, it could be caused by stress, bad water conditions, and such.

First thing you should know that it is caused by bacteria, so using Aquarium salt (not table salt--) is the best thing to do and raising the temperature to perhaps 78F. (But you would need a thermometre and heater for that). Make sure that the female isn't showing similar symptoms as I'm sure you are probably sharing nets and such which can get the other female infected as well, especially since you said her fins were injured.

If it gets worse using medicine to fight against fin rot would be best. Without overdosing, and proper temperature management.
Thanks for taking the time to make this post. :)

I agree that I should hold off the breeding until I have enough experience and the proper equipment. I will most likely buy another 1-2 gallon fish bowl and keep them separated.

Now, I know the bowl is only 1 gallon so I do 50% water changes every second day (without removing the betta from the bowl) and 100% water change at the end of the week. I have read that bettas don't produce a lot of waste so I am certain that it can't bother them with the water changes I do.

As for the Aloe Gel, it is called Dajana Aloe Gel and it is only available in Europe and it's especially for betta fishes. As soon as I applied it for the first time my male betta started getting better and better and he had now almost completely recovered.



Also, I said that my female's fins were injured when I first got it. It is completely healthy now and her fins grew back nicely as you can see on the picture I posted earlier today.

Yeah, the guy at the pet store told me that I could use kitchen salt, so I did until someone here told me that it is bad because of the Iodine. Anyway, I didn't put much at all, just a tiny pinch....

You are right about fin melt! I thought, up until this moment that it was clamped fins and that he got them by catching a cold. I must have been very lucky because I cured it in 10 days with this Aloe Gel... I will definitely put an effort to find AQ salt! Thanks for the great advice!

I will try to obtain everything I can for my first-aid kit but I doubt that I will find exactly the same products people recommend. I will probably end up with different brands of the same product.

Thanks for the great advice!
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