Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Care
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-14-2012, 07:34 PM   #1 
bahamut285
Member
 
bahamut285's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Canada
GUIDE: Tank Cyling/Nitrogen Cycle [With Pictures]

I know there are thousands of guides on HOW to cycle your tank, but this guide is just to explain HOW the cycle works. This guide will encompass both filtered and unfiltered tanks.

The picture below is the entire Nitrogen Cycle. It is a bit intimidating at first but I will break it down into small parts.



**DISCLAIMER**: Once again, I will not talk about plants. Extremely heavily planted tanks are capable of running the entire nitrogen cycle without a filter. However heavily planted literally means HEAVILY PLANTED.



1. Waste and Ammonia



In the first part of the cycle, you have your fish. Uneaten food and their excrement (poop) are considered WASTES and they start degrading into ammonia.

As stated in my Beginner Chemistry Guide, Ammonia is a HIGHLY TOXIC substance that causes many deaths for beginner/newbie aquarists.

If you DO NOT have a filter in your tank, your nitrogen cycle adventure stops here. To remove the ammonia, you MUST do regular water changes followed by an eventual 100%. Doing ONLY partial water changes will not keep up with a closed system and will eventually be ineffective.


2. Nitrosomonas and NitRITE



If you have a filter, these are the first (and slowest) bacteria to start populating your tank. Nitrosomonas bacteria will "eat" your tank's ammonia and convert it into NitRITE. NitRITE is far less toxic than ammonia, but it is still a fairly toxic substance to your fish.

Since this process is fairly slow, it is still required on your part to do small water changes just so that there is a safe level of ammonia for the bacteria to eat, but not too much to be harmful to your fish. In my own personal opinion, keeping the ammonia level at 0.5 (considered "stressful" under most bottles) is perfectly fine and fairly optimum for growing nitrosomonas.

Nitrosomonas enjoy the following conditions:
- Darkness: They are photophobic, however if your filter is in the light, they will grow a slime covering to protect themselves
- pH of 6-9
- 20-30C or 68-86F

To stress, they take quite a long time to grow and divide due to their high need for ammonia. This is why a lot of aquarists prefer to cycle without the fish in the tank. You can dump a lot of raw ammonia into the tank so the nitrosomonas can move in fairly quickly without endangering the fish.


3. Nitrobacter and NitRATE



The next genus of bacteria to move into your tank are called Nitrobacter bacteria. They will "eat" the nitRITE produced by the nitrosomonas bacteria. NitRATE is the least toxic form of nitrogen among the three, but it is still toxic in large amounts. Nitrobacter tend to move in and divide faster than nitrosomonas, but patience is still required for them to grow, as their existence depends on the slow-growing nitrosomonas.

Nitrobacter bacteria are a little more flexible than nitrosomonas. Their optimal growing conditions are:

-ph of 5-8.5
- 0-50C or 32-120F


4. NitRATE and Water changes



This is the final step of the Nitrogen cycle. In nature, nitRATE is enjoyed by many plant species, both terrestrial and aquatic. However, if plants do not exist in your aquarium, you must remove nitRATE manually by performing water changes. There is NO substitute for water changes and they are CRUCIAL to maintaining water quality.

**Unless you are a fairly advance aquarist (unlike myself) in which you can afford to care for many many many many plants, you must, must, MUST do your water changes.**

I hope this guide is helpful for your continuing adventure in educational experiences~

Pictures (C) to myself
Knowledge (C) to my brain
bahamut285 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 08:00 PM   #2 
NoahG
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Upstate NY
I love the illustrations, haha
NoahG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 08:02 PM   #3 
wystearya
Member
 
wystearya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: WV
Your picture is too cute! I love the smiling bacteria. :)
wystearya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 08:13 PM   #4 
bahamut285
Member
 
bahamut285's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Canada
Lol thank you, I hope it was informative XD
bahamut285 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 08:18 PM   #5 
registereduser
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Very cute and very helpful!

Question:

If I want to "seed" my tank with bacteria from an established cycled tank, at which point should it be done?
registereduser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 08:22 PM   #6 
bahamut285
Member
 
bahamut285's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Canada
@Registered: I would do it at the beginning maybe a few days or a week into the cycle, just so there is enough ammonia present to support the Nitrosomonas bacteria. They are the slowest growing as well as they provide food for nitrobacter bacteria so it would make the most logical sense (in my opinion) to seed them.

At first their population will diminish in size if your tank doesn't have enough ammonia to feed them, but they'll eventually perk back up.
bahamut285 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 08:34 PM   #7 
dramaqueen
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Central Texas
Pretty good for someone who wrote it out of boredom.
dramaqueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2012, 02:19 AM   #8 
thekoimaiden
Member
 
thekoimaiden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Virginia, USA
This is a pretty awesome guide. I just see one problem with it (dunno it could potentially be a big one). The breakdown of fish poop isn't the only thing that creates ammonia; fish excrete it directly through their gills. Since I'm not sure what media you used, a fix could be as simple as another arrow. But I just don't want people to get the idea that just removing fish poop will get rid of the ammonia.
thekoimaiden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2012, 02:46 AM   #9 
Bombalurina
Member
 
Bombalurina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Australia
That is the cutest group of nitrifying bacteria I have ever seen.
Bombalurina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2012, 03:35 PM   #10 
bahamut285
Member
 
bahamut285's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Canada
@Koimaiden: Yeah I completely forgot about it, I can't really change it because it's actually a hand-drawn picture.

@Bombularina: Thanks :D
bahamut285 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help me!!! The nitrogen cycle AaryonN Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 4 08-06-2010 10:22 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.