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Old 12-26-2012, 06:48 PM   #31 
LittleBlueFishlets
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Originally Posted by LittleBettaFish View Post
Well 1 teaspoon is roughly 5ml, so you will probably need about .5ml of water conditioner to every gallon of water.

I use the 1ml syringes to add in my water conditioner as I only need around .25ml a bucket.
You could add about 10 drops of conditioner in every gallon of water.

(There are about 20 drops in 1 mL. This can vary a little depending on the liquid, but I tested this using my conditioner and it was pretty close.... My conditioner also says to add 5mL per 10 gallons, which is the same as 1 tsp per 10 gallons..... I've been using 10 drops per gallon for about 4 months now, and haven't had any issues with it.)

Last edited by LittleBlueFishlets; 12-26-2012 at 06:50 PM.
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Old 12-26-2012, 07:15 PM   #32 
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I'm noticing a trend with all of the tanks I've been looking at. If they have a top there's usually a filter but no built in heater and therefore nowhere to put the cord for a heater. If there's no top there's obviously. space for a heater cord but no filter so you have to buy one in addition to the tank. The money's not an issue I'd just like to have a filter already built in. Do heaters with their cords work with tanks with filters built into their tops? It seems like running the cord under the top would cause it to be askew.
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Old 12-26-2012, 08:01 PM   #33 
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Usually there's a cut out for the filter. I just run the cord for the heater through that hole and it works fine. My tanks were all kits that included the tank, filter and cover.
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Old 12-26-2012, 10:08 PM   #34 
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All three of my covers and even my glass one to some extent had places that could be cut out for filters or cords. The glass one had a small plastic thing that fit on the edge of it. I can get a pic of you're curious. It was kind of a pain to get right.
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Old 12-26-2012, 10:21 PM   #35 
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If a picture's not too much trouble I'd appreciate it. Most pictures seem to hide the filter so I can't really see whether there's space for a cord or not.
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Old 12-26-2012, 10:39 PM   #36 
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Originally Posted by LittleBettaFish View Post
Okay, first things first, he is probably settling into his new home, hence the poor appetite and inactivity. It is not uncommon for new fish not to eat for a few days after being brought home.

You really need a liquid water test. pH is not really important. Fish store employees will tell you it is the be all and end all of water testing but it is not.

Ammonia is what is important. This is toxic to your fish at very low levels and is invisible. So while your water may look and smell clean, it could actually be very harmful to your betta. In a 1 gallon tank, ammonia can build up surprisingly fast. This is why you want to have your own test kit so you can make sure that whenever it reaches above 0ppm (even 0.25ppm is too high) you know to do a water change to bring it back down.

Prolonged exposure to poor water conditions causes stress, increases the risk of your betta becoming sick and can drastically shorten his lifespan. This is why it is so important to read up and be familiar with at least the basics of the nitrogen cycle, in particular the dangers of things such as ammonia and nitrite (you won't have to deal with this in an uncycled tank such as yours).

The reason you want to get a heater is not just to keep the water warm, but to ensure that it is consistently warm 24 hours of the day. Temperature fluctuations are what you want to avoid and in a 1 gallon bowl they can be quite rapid. While a healthy betta may be able to handle small changes in water temperature, if your betta is not particularly healthy, or the swings in temperature are quite drastic, it can create problems and usually leads to outbreaks of disease such as ich and velvet. Both of which are a headache to get rid of.

Hope that helps some. Sounds like you are doing the right thing by coming here first.
What is considered a drastic change in temperature?
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Old 12-26-2012, 10:58 PM   #37 
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Grabbed a couple of pictures for you of both my covers.


This is the glass cover with the silly plastic piece. I had to cut parts out for my filters to fit. The glass slides into a slit on the plastic piece there.


Here is another view of it.


How it looks. I've had that light strip since I got my 10 gallon so it doesn't go along the whole tank but it's enough light.


Here is an opening from the Aquean cover. You can see the jagged edges where it was cut out. There were perforations to cut it out.


And here it is around my filter.

Hope these helped :D
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Old 12-27-2012, 12:32 AM   #38 
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http://freshaquarium.about.com/cs/tr...ltiinfresh.htm

The above is a great link.
Also, allow me to quote chichlid forum.com (this is only to address inaccessibility to aquarium salt):Salt:

Salt is frequently recommended for treating a myriad of fish diseases, especially those involving external protozoa and fungi.

What kind of salt? We are not talking about “marine salt” or “cichlid salt” (both of which typically contain a blend of mineral salts and trace elements specially formulated for aquarium use to simulate ocean or rift lake water chemistry). You want sodium chloride (NaCl). “Aquarium salt” is the most widely used form because it does not contain the iodine or anti-caking agents that table salt does. I will say, however, that several credible sources assert that the minute amount of additives in table salt are harmless. Robert T. Ricketts, writing for AquaSource online magazine, puts it best with “any water-living vertebrate would be pickled in brine well before toxic concentrations of iodine could be reached.” Still, others offer strong warnings about the dangers of iodine and prussiate of soda (an anti-caking agent) and suggest “canning salt” as a cheaper alternative to aquarium salt. Make your own choice, but since I’ve heard only warnings and no actual accounts of fish death by table salt, I assume it’s most likely the ‘better safe than sorry’ principle at work here. “Sea salt” is another option, and is generally available in nutrition stores because it is considered a more “natural” form of salt. It does not contain iodine, but may have anti-caking agents. I have used it in my aquariums without incident.
"
The above can be found
http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/ich.php

again, i am only addressing your one statement. however, BOTH links have TONS of info you may find invaluable.
Best of Luck! :)
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:46 AM   #39 
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Thanks for the pics Kithy that looks really creative! And Solomon I've learned several new things from those links already. I'm going to put some sea salt in his new water, it specifically says "no iodide" which I've figured out is one of the worst things there can be in it.
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:02 PM   #40 
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Just an update, he still hasn't touched any food, he's moved around a lot more. He swims for quick bursts sometimes then others he kind of floats lazily along. He doesn't seem to be scratching on anything so that's okay. He's lost about half of his tail fin and his eyes seemed to be bulging yesterday. I did a 100% water change with some aquarium salt and the special tetrasafe conditioner. His eyes aren't bulging at all anymore. I'm assuming I should only add salt when I do water changes. Should I add any with 50% water changes?
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