Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-09-2013, 04:48 PM   #1 
littlegreendog
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Dropsy treatment

About two months ago I noticed my female Betta had slightly begun to swell. At first I thought it was constipation, so I took the precautions for that. The swelling never stopped, and she was pooping.

I then thought it was a parasite of some sort. I gave her medication for that, again, no response.

Now, just last night, I noticed her scales were raised slightly. Along with that, she is extremely swelled up. Normally she is a very active fish, but now she just sits at the bottom of the tank, only coming up for air and food.

Also, when constipation was crossed off, I quickly began to treat her tank with Epsom salt, with 100% water changes every three days. She lives in a one gallon tank, no heater. I used two teaspoons of epsom salt with the water changes.

I have now placed her in a medium sized plastic bowl until the sickness gets under control. I am using a quarter teaspoon of Epsom salt for that bowl, and I have also ordered Betta revive for her.

What could I be doing different, and is there anything else I should do?

Here is a picture.

http://i48.tinypic.com/2py0vaq.jpg

Note the rip in her dorsal fin that also appeared randomly. She lives alone, so I have no idea how she could have gotten it. For that, I am treating her with Betta fix.
littlegreendog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2013, 07:15 PM   #2 
asukabetta
Member
 
asukabetta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
yes i do see pineconing and it does look like dropsy, I suggest to stop on using betta revive, it has tree oil and it is very harmful for the labyrinthine organ of the bettas.

since the swelling is not going down and you treated it for constipation and parasites it leaves only that option

And if it is dropsy and the scales have already pineconed it may be a bit too late-- because it means that the internal organs are already failing, I know this isn't what you wanted to hear, but keep it up with the epsom salts and keep the water warm and comfy. Let us hope it is not dropsy.
asukabetta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 09:08 AM   #3 
littlegreendog
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
I have made the decision to humanely put my Betta to sleep... no medications are working and I have tried everything I can to help her. She was worse today. The pine coning is more intense and she can barely move now.

How do I humanely and peacefully put my Betta to sleep?
littlegreendog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 09:14 AM   #4 
jinxhex
Member
 
jinxhex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Spring, Texas
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlegreendog View Post
I have made the decision to humanely put my Betta to sleep... no medications are working and I have tried everything I can to help her. She was worse today. The pine coning is more intense and she can barely move now.

How do I humanely and peacefully put my Betta to sleep?
You can use Clove Oil

http://www.oscarfishlover.com/helpfu...euthanize-fish

Sorry to hear about your fish!
jinxhex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 04:26 PM   #5 
asukabetta
Member
 
asukabetta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Ice-Cold Bath
Tropical fish less than 2 inches in length can be euthanized by exposing them to freezing cold water. The fish is put into a small container along with some aquarium water at the normal temperature. This container is then placed into a much larger container filled with crushed ice. This will rapidly chill the water in the smaller container, eventually rendering the fish unconscious. When death is verified, the fish can be removed. Decapitation
While too grisly for most aquarists, stunning a fish, decapitating it and then pithing it (physically destroying the brain with a metal rod) is a humane way to euthanize a fish. Because fish can remain conscious for some time after decapitation, the pithing step is essential. If you don’t know how to pith a fish, then don’t use this method.
Clove Oil
Also known as eugenol, clove oil is a sedative at low doses, but at higher doses it has been recommended by some researchers as an inexpensive way to euthanize fish, particularly small fish. In a container, mix aquarium water with clove oil and mix. When exposed to high concentrations of clove oil, fish quickly lose consciousness and stop breathing, both of which reduce pain. Hypoxia eventually causes death, and once verified, the fish can be removed from the water and clove oil mixture. The required dose for euthanasia is 400 mg/l or more.
Clove oil contains some substances believed to be carcinogenic and should be handled with care.
Carbon Dioxide
Pressurized carbon dioxide vigorously bubbled through water for at least 30 seconds will quickly displace dissolved oxygen. A fish placed in such a container will quickly become unconscious and soon die, assuming the fish cannot breathe atmospheric air (many freshwater fish can: check before using this method). Once death is verified, the fish can be removed.
Note that this is not the same thing as methods based on Alka-Seltzer tablets or carbonated drinking water, neither of which will produce the environmental conditions described. Such methods have not been proven to be humane, are not used by vets and cannot be recommended here.
Anesthetic Overdose
By administering an overdose of an anesthetic, vets can ensure that large fish are humanely euthanized. This is the method recommended for use with large fish, such as koi, oscars and saltwater angelfish. Because large fish will be stressed by being caught and transported to a veterinarian, the vet may need to visit the fishkeeper’s home and euthanize the fish there.
A variety of anesthetics have been used for this purpose, including 2-phenoxyethanol (bath, 0.3 to 0.4 mg/liter); benzocaine hydrochloride (bath, at least 250 mg/liter); sodium pentobarbital (injection, 60 to 100 mg/kg body weight); tricaine methanesulphonate, also known as MS222 (bath, 300 mg/liter). Because tricaine methanesulphonate is acidic, it will need to be used alongside an appropriate pH buffer. You need a pH buffer if you have fish from a non-acidic aquarium. Taking a marine fish from an aquarium at pH 8.5 and dumping it into a bath containing MS222 solution at around pH 6.5 will be intensely stressful. So if using this chemical, buffer the water to the correct pH before adding the fish.
It may take more than 30 minutes for death to occur, and it is recommended that fish be left in anesthetic baths for at least 2 hours to be sure. Death will need to be verified before the fish is removed.
Disposing of Dead Fish
Dead fish should not be flushed. The body can be burned, disposed of in the household trash or buried in the garden away from bodies of water. If placed in the trash, wrap the body in paper or plastic film to prevent it from being consumed by rats, cats and other garbage feeders. If buried in the garden, place the body deep enough underground that scavengers will not unearth it.


source: http://www.fishchannel.com/fish-health/euthanasia.aspx
asukabetta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 05:03 PM   #6 
Tikibirds
Member
 
Tikibirds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Warrensburg, NY
Quote:
I suggest to stop on using betta revive, it has tree oil and it is very harmful for the labyrinthine organ of the bettas.
That's bettafix not betta revive
Tikibirds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 10:23 PM   #7 
callistra
Member
 
callistra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Only humane way is clove oil or other pharmaceutics that do the same thing. Follow the oscar guide.

In the future a bowl of that size needs two water changes a week at minimum - one 50% and one 100% including a through rinsing of the gravel. Also your betta will probably stay healthy longer in a 2+g as that is really minimum because they will constantly be exposed to low levels of ammonia in a bowl that small and keeping them healthy is hard.
callistra is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Have you ever heard of this dropsy treatment method? Pogthefish Betta Chat 4 08-04-2012 05:02 PM
Dropsy... Treatment guidance? teeneythebetta Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 18 07-29-2012 09:24 AM
TANK ILLNESS UPKEEP- treatment of possible dropsy & popeye teeneythebetta Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 2 07-03-2012 06:56 PM
A question about dropsy treatment XiaoYu Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 1 06-24-2012 08:40 PM
Dropsy Treatment bluebettafish Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 8 11-05-2009 01:16 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.