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Old 02-20-2013, 09:54 AM   #1 
DizzyD
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nuetral Regulator experience?

Does anyone have any experience with Seachem's Neutral Regulator? It claims to bring the PH to 7, and buffer it. It also claims to remove Chlorine and Chloramine, bind Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. And soften the water.

I ordered some and tried it in my change water. After a few days of sitting in a container, it didn't seem to change the PH much.

I have well water and it comes out of the faucet at about 7.6 ph, hard with some nitrates. I was hoping this would soften it up and bring it down to 7. Any ideas or suggestions would be welcome.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:54 PM   #2 
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I have very soft water so the opposite problem. Our tap water has essentially no buffering capacity so the pH was prone to crashing, which stressed my bettas out.

I used Seachem Neutral Regulator in my uncycled tanks, and it actually increased my KH so that the water was able to better hold a stable pH value. It did struggle a little if I went heavy on the IAL, but after three or so days (when I would do another 100% water change) it still hovered around the 6.8-7.0 (without it the pH was lucky to be at 6).

However, I think softer water is easy to make harder than hard water is to make soft.

I know a lot of members on this board successfully keep their bettas in very hard water with a high pH. Oldfishlady is one of them and she doesn't seem to have any issues. Splendens will usually adapt as long as the pH is stable. Constant fluctuations are what cause stress, so this is why people tend to avoid using pH adjusting chemicals in their tanks.
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:10 PM   #3 
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The only "safe" way to soften water is to mix it with water that is already soft - like RO water. Extra chemicals in the water just can't be good for the fish.

If you have overly soft water, you can use more of certain types of rock, or a remineralizer - this is much safer than chemicals also.

That being said, 7.6 is not bad for bettas as long as it is stable. My water from the tap is about 7.6, and I have zero issues. Stability is the most important factor.
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:18 PM   #4 
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I used crushed coral in the filter of my cycled tanks, but my uncycled tanks had no filters and I did such frequent water changes the crushed coral had no effect.

That was the only reason I used Neutral Regulator as my pH was not stable and my fish were clearing stressed because of it.

I am adverse to using chemicals to adjust the pH. However, because Neutral Regulator worked by changing the KH value of my water and not than just temporarily pushing up the pH like a lot of products, it actually kept the pH much more stable.

Neutral Regulator is really the only chemical product I recommend for altering the pH as in my case it increased the KH of my water, which provided a much more long-term fix.
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:27 PM   #5 
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I know 7.6 isn't too bad if it was stable, but once I get it in the tank it seems to jump to around 8 - 8.2. I was hoping Nuetral Regulator would stop that Jump even if it just keeps it at 7.6. Hopefully I will know in the next few days, if not weeks...
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:30 PM   #6 
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Is there anything in your tank that could be causing the pH to rise? Some gravels and things such as limestone rock and decorative shells can cause your pH to go up.
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:38 PM   #7 
DizzyD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleBettaFish View Post
Is there anything in your tank that could be causing the pH to rise? Some gravels and things such as limestone rock and decorative shells can cause your pH to go up.
I do have a rock I purchased at Pet Smart. It was called a Zebra Rock? but it seems like some kind of sandstone. At least that is how it feels to me.
http://www.petsmart.com/product/inde...uctId=12214879

I use Carib Sea Super Natrals sand substrate, So I don't think that would be the problem. Maybe it is the rock... But it looks so good in there. Any way to safely keep it from increasing the PH?
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:45 PM   #8 
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The rock could be a possibility. Not sure what type of rock it is. I was thinking granite, but I am pretty sure granite does not effect the pH. However, it has been ages since I did physical geography back in high school so it may be another type of rock.

Looking at the Caribsea super naturals sand range it doesn't look like it is supposed to affect your pH or alkalinity.

Maybe try taking the rock out and seeing if your pH stays around the same.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:11 PM   #9 
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You might also put some water in a bucket, test the pH, drop the rock in it, and test it several days later. If it rises, it's definitely the rock.

Driftwood, IAL, etc, will drop your pH, but only to a certain extent. Same with Fluval Shrimp Stratum (substrate). It's very hard to lower the pH of water without actually having LESS minerals in the water, which means using some RO water (or even distilled water) with your normal tap water to create a mix that naturally has a lower pH.

@LittleBettaFish - Yes, the regulator makes much more sense to raise your pH (as would a remineralizer, like the crushed coral, etc) than it does to lower it.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:14 PM   #10 
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I should say that all of this is based on my blind guess that the high pH is caused mostly by hard water/minerals, as it usually is.
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