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Old 02-21-2013, 02:35 PM   #1 
jennydlee
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question about nitrogen cycle(pic included)

ammonia stayed the same the past couple days and nitrites just keep getting higher and nitrates are close to 5.0
is it supposed to be this way? i thought nitrites rid of ammonia
ammonia's been staying the same and nitrites have just been getting higher
with nitrates also staying the same




if you can't see pic
here's a link
http://i48.tinypic.com/abpb2b.jpg
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Old 02-21-2013, 03:11 PM   #2 
Otterfun
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What do you have in the tank e.g. fish, snail, shrimp, Prime dechlorinator, plant fert, Stress Zyme, Stress Coat +?

You need a water change just looking at the Ammonia and Nitrites if you have fish in the tank. If this is fishless, then check the sticky on Nitrogen Cycle and Cycling for more info.

When I was in the middle of the cycle, I have similar readings for a couple of days. I was told I could have done too much WC.

Now my 5g filtered and planted tank has 0 Ammonia & Nitrite, 20 Nitrate 4 days in a row and Day 39 of my cycling with 1 guppy, 1 golden mystery snail, 4 Amano, and 6 RCS.

Last edited by Otterfun; 02-21-2013 at 03:13 PM.
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Old 02-21-2013, 03:43 PM   #3 
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Is this a fish-in cycle or fishless? If it's fish-in you need to do a WC to bring your ammonia to .25ppm or less. If fishless you can leave it alone - unless the nitrites spike off the chart, then that would require a WC since it can inhibit bacteria growth.

Ammonia is converted to nitrites so in theory when your nitrites rise your ammonia should drop, unless you have a constant source of ammonia in the tank such as something decaying (plant matter, excess food, or certain kinds of substrate - such as ADA Aquasoil) or fish.
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Old 02-21-2013, 03:43 PM   #4 
jennydlee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otterfun View Post
What do you have in the tank e.g. fish, snail, shrimp, Prime dechlorinator, plant fert, Stress Zyme, Stress Coat +?
i have a dechlorinater in there and 4 plants
it is fishless

You need a water change just looking at the Ammonia and Nitrites if you have fish in the tank. If this is fishless, then check the sticky on Nitrogen Cycle and Cycling for more info.

When I was in the middle of the cycle, I have similar readings for a couple of days. I was told I could have done too much WC.
i did no water changes cept i added in water a couple times whenever water evaporated since the filter is loud when the output isn't covered
i did add in tetra safestart the day i set it up... but let it sit for 2 days with very little to no ammonia source since filter broke so i had to get a new one and was only able to after 2 days
i don't know if that affected it...

Now my 5g filtered and planted tank has 0 Ammonia & Nitrite, 20 Nitrate 4 days in a row and Day 39 of my cycling with 1 guppy, 1 golden mystery snail, 4 Amano, and 6 RCS.
..
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Old 02-21-2013, 03:46 PM   #5 
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If you have no fish in there, leave it alone for now. If you are seeing nitrites, the cycle is working properly. You won't see nitrite unless the ammonia is being converted.
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Old 02-21-2013, 03:48 PM   #6 
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copied and pasted from the sticky:
1. Fishless cycle using pure ammonia:
This has quickly become the most popular method of cycling, accurate and easy to follow, if you can find the right stuff! Basically, you want to dose pure ammonia into a tank with no fish or plants.

Pros: Easy to follow, accurate, no risk of mould infestation. Dosing large amounts of ammonia initially allows for a larger amount of fish to be added initially (in communities).
Cons: Pure ammonia cannot be found in all countries, there is a risk of other ingredients. If there are no ingredients listed, shake the bottle around. There should not be any foam that looks like soap bubbles.
Ammonia is toxic to all life, dosing these high levels of ammonia does put aquatic plants under risk.
Ammonia is an irritant that can burn the skin and eyes. It is best to wear gloves when dealing with ammonia. Always be careful!

Process:
This method is where the pure ammonia and the 5mm syringe come into play. Basically you want to dose at 2-5ppm ammonia initially. Ammonia should never be higher than 7ppm, this can stall your cycle. Test for ammonia and nitrite every 2-3 days. Replenish ammonia to original levels as you see it fall down. This is considered the longest part of the cycle process.

Once you see nitrites, you will probably notice they skyrocket up extremely fast, even “off the charts” for your test kit. This is fine and completely normal. Keep dosing ammonia to the required amount. Once nitrites have peaked, it is generally only a few days before they get back down to zero. When you see nitrites going down, start testing for nitrates, which should start appearing.

For your final test, wait until your ammonia is pretty much at zero, and dose to 2ppm. When ammonia falls to 0ppm within 24 hours (or less) your tank is cycled!
Now, do a large water change, 75-85%, and you are ready to add your fish!

But how do I know how much ammonia to add?
With your trusty 5mm syringe and ammonia bottle in hand, head over here.
The calculator is at the bottom- “Fishless Cycling- Ammonia Required.” Fill in the information, and it will tell you how many mL of ammonia you need. Be sure not to forget to change the settings to gallons if that’s what you use! The % of Ammonia strength will be written on the bottle.
*If your tank already has 1ppm of ammonia, just calculate enough for 3ppm to get it back to 4ppm.

*********************

looks like you are on track...
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:00 PM   #7 
jennydlee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahspins View Post
Is this a fish-in cycle or fishless? If it's fish-in you need to do a WC to bring your ammonia to .25ppm or less. If fishless you can leave it alone - unless the nitrites spike off the chart, then that would require a WC since it can inhibit bacteria growth.

Ammonia is converted to nitrites so in theory when your nitrites rise your ammonia should drop, unless you have a constant source of ammonia in the tank such as something decaying (plant matter, excess food, or certain kinds of substrate - such as ADA Aquasoil) or fish.

it is fishless
and i have a small meshbag in there filled with dried bloodworms.. it's been decaying for a week now
is it safe to remove it now?
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:01 PM   #8 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tekkguy View Post
If you have no fish in there, leave it alone for now. If you are seeing nitrites, the cycle is working properly. You won't see nitrite unless the ammonia is being converted.
thank you!
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:03 PM   #9 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otterfun View Post
copied and pasted from the sticky:
1. Fishless cycle using pure ammonia:
This has quickly become the most popular method of cycling, accurate and easy to follow, if you can find the right stuff! Basically, you want to dose pure ammonia into a tank with no fish or plants.

Pros: Easy to follow, accurate, no risk of mould infestation. Dosing large amounts of ammonia initially allows for a larger amount of fish to be added initially (in communities).
Cons: Pure ammonia cannot be found in all countries, there is a risk of other ingredients. If there are no ingredients listed, shake the bottle around. There should not be any foam that looks like soap bubbles.
Ammonia is toxic to all life, dosing these high levels of ammonia does put aquatic plants under risk.
Ammonia is an irritant that can burn the skin and eyes. It is best to wear gloves when dealing with ammonia. Always be careful!

Process:
This method is where the pure ammonia and the 5mm syringe come into play. Basically you want to dose at 2-5ppm ammonia initially. Ammonia should never be higher than 7ppm, this can stall your cycle. Test for ammonia and nitrite every 2-3 days. Replenish ammonia to original levels as you see it fall down. This is considered the longest part of the cycle process.

Once you see nitrites, you will probably notice they skyrocket up extremely fast, even “off the charts” for your test kit. This is fine and completely normal. Keep dosing ammonia to the required amount. Once nitrites have peaked, it is generally only a few days before they get back down to zero. When you see nitrites going down, start testing for nitrates, which should start appearing.

For your final test, wait until your ammonia is pretty much at zero, and dose to 2ppm. When ammonia falls to 0ppm within 24 hours (or less) your tank is cycled!
Now, do a large water change, 75-85%, and you are ready to add your fish!

But how do I know how much ammonia to add?
With your trusty 5mm syringe and ammonia bottle in hand, head over here.
The calculator is at the bottom- “Fishless Cycling- Ammonia Required.” Fill in the information, and it will tell you how many mL of ammonia you need. Be sure not to forget to change the settings to gallons if that’s what you use! The % of Ammonia strength will be written on the bottle.
*If your tank already has 1ppm of ammonia, just calculate enough for 3ppm to get it back to 4ppm.

*********************

looks like you are on track...
thank you for taking your time out of your day to help me!!! appreciate it so much
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Old 02-21-2013, 04:04 PM   #10 
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I would take the bloodworms out now ... looks like your ammonia is at 5ppm at least, which is the highest your test goes. If you add too much ammonia you'll stall/crash the cycle and it will take longer.
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