Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Care
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-11-2013, 09:02 PM   #1 
Lisa Ann
New Member
 
Lisa Ann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Arizona
Arrow so new tank???

So a friend of mine has a 20 or 50 gallon tank (cant really remember) that she said she would like to give it to me. It definitely needs to be cleaned out though. I have a perfect spot to put it.I just want to make sure the tank has a good set-up on the inside... my husband had a good point though...isn't that a lot of room for one betta? And if I make his set up too cosy? I'm afraid I'd never get to see him in such a large tank....

Anyways I guess I was just wanting to know what all I need to maintain such a large tank,and what are some good tank mates for betta? And anyother big new tank advice? If you haven't seen any of my other posts:I'm new to betta keeping and I love my fish already and just want him to be happy and healthy :) :)
Lisa Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 09:09 PM   #2 
Lisa Ann
New Member
 
Lisa Ann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Arizona
Question kinda what I had in mind.....

Is it sufficient and can someone please explain to me how it works? And what all I need for it? Please help :) and can anyone recommend some good info websites. I'm trying to do all the learning I can.

I never know what to trust on the internet these days...
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Lisa Ann; 03-11-2013 at 09:15 PM. Reason: keep forgetting little details...sorry
Lisa Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 09:29 PM   #3 
JBonez423
Member
 
JBonez423's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: CT, soon CA.
Well, personally I would make myself some dividers and have a few little bettas of my own! ;] Probably divide it into four and have all different kinds. You could also divide it into two and go for other fish that are compatible with bettas (there's a thread on here all about it). I do feel like a betta would be uncomfortable in something so big, though. I know they like good size but still small territories free from other bettas.

Overall, I say have fun with it! Decorate it a lot, do your research on what kind of aquatic fish/plants/snails/etc. you might want to have in there. That's a lot of room to make really, really nice looking!
JBonez423 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 09:38 PM   #4 
Bombalurina
Member
 
Bombalurina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Australia
Personally, I think most bettas are absolutely fine in large tanks given sufficient cover (wide open spaces make them nervous). The exceptions are those that have too much finnage to be good swimmers, or those who just freak out in anything over a gallon or so.

There are a vast number of suitable tankmates for a betta, but it does depend on the pH and hardness of your water. :)
Bombalurina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 09:45 PM   #5 
Lisa Ann
New Member
 
Lisa Ann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Arizona
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bombalurina View Post
Personally, I think most bettas are absolutely fine in large tanks given sufficient cover (wide open spaces make them nervous). The exceptions are those that have too much finnage to be good swimmers, or those who just freak out in anything over a gallon or so.

There are a vast number of suitable tankmates for a betta, but it does depend on the pH and hardness of your water. :)
I'm glad you responded to me. Maybe you can be the one to explain all the water goodies...cuz I see lots of things talking about ph balance,ammonia, etc. Like I said I've never had a betta before, just horses and those don't take a blind man to tell the difference between LOL :) I'm trying to read up on everything but it's hard to learn about it when you don't understand it fully.
Lisa Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:36 PM   #6 
Bombalurina
Member
 
Bombalurina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Australia
Sure thing. Here's a quick breakdown on the important bits:

pH - this is whether your water is acidic (below 7), neutral (7) or alkaline/basic (above 7). Bettas like their water neutral or slightly acidic, but as they have been bred and domesticated they have become more tolerant of different water conditions and can cope with basic water too. :) If water is too acidic or too basic, it can hurt fish by denaturing their proteins, which is changing the shape of the actual protein. This is bad.

Hardness: this is measured in GH (general hardness) and KH (carbonate hardness). Bettas prefer softer water, as do tetras, loaches and cories. Livebearers prefer harder water. I believe that the wrong level of hardness can effect kidney function. My water is ridiculously soft (1 degree of hardness).

Ammonia: ammonia is toxic in high quantities. It is the byproduct of fish waste as it breaks down. Ideally, you want ammonia to be 0, and should not let it get above .25ppm. High levels of ammonia burn a fish's skin and gills.

Nitrite: nitrite is what occurs when little things called nitrifying bacteria settle on surfaces, particularly filters, in your tank, and nom on the ammonia. Essentially, they poop out nitrites. Nitrites are also toxic in high quantities, so again, don't let them get above 0.5ppm.

Nitrate: the third stage of nitrifying bacteria poop. The bacteria essentially eat the nitrites and poop them out as nitrates. Nitrates are still dangerous, but far less so then nitrites or ammonia. Ideally, you want to keep nitrates under 20. Anything above 40 is bad.

Of course, this is a massively simplistic description of these things. :p Essentially, a cycle is when the bacteria have colonised your tank and converted the ammonia to nitrites and then nitrates. :)

I hope this helps provide a starting place for you. :)
Bombalurina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:49 PM   #7 
Lisa Ann
New Member
 
Lisa Ann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Arizona
Smile

Definitely a lot of good information...I know more about betta than I did yesterday that's for sure :) I've heard that you can buy water testers to test all of the above...but due to the isolation of where I live,I might have to order one along with a new heater for my (20-50) gallon tank, any suggestions as to websites and brand names, cuz I want to make sure I'm getting the right things :) sounds like me though always a worry wart :) :)
Lisa Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:51 PM   #8 
Bombalurina
Member
 
Bombalurina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Australia
API master kit is the one to go for. :) It tests ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH and high pH (for pH over 7.5). You can also get hardness test kits from API, though you may be able to find out your water hardness from your local water authority. :)
Bombalurina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:55 PM   #9 
Lisa Ann
New Member
 
Lisa Ann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Arizona
Awesome :) So when I do get this bigger tank,what size heater should I look for?
Lisa Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2013, 01:13 AM   #10 
Lisa Ann
New Member
 
Lisa Ann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Arizona
Once again doing research on tank care and was just wondering what seachem was?
Lisa Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.