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Old 03-16-2013, 01:20 PM   #1 
LyraDove
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Maybe unconventional, but...

My fish, a young female Crowntail, is so cute, and I wuv her J
My routine with her starts in the morning when I boil water and put it in a ceramic gravy boat; I tuck the boat beside/partly under her fish-shaped (unfiltered, unheated) fish bowl and she hovers over it to play and enjoy the heat; it also raises the temp in her bowl a little bit. Gradually she starts to swim around in the cooler parts of the bowl – she seems energetic after the warm-up.
I feed her red pellets, though I have to search for the smallest ones because she’s still little. She gobbles freeze dried worms very happily. On occasion, I have also fed her one pellet-sized, unseasoned cooked shred of each of the following: roasted pork, roasted chicken, canned tuna (carefully rinsed to remove salt), and chicken liver. She liked these foods very much since they were soft and fit her mouth size better than the pellets – her everyday food. Once a week I change her water almost completely. I pour water from her bowl into a clean plastic cup, put her in it, crack the hull off a hemp seed and feed her the soft white kernel inside so she has a little fiber in her system. Then I rinse all the gravel, the silk plant and several mother-of-pearl pieces (1 1/2 inch round hoops; she likes to swim through them) put them in the water being conditioned and warmed for her bowl, and clean the whole empty bowl inside and out with white vinegar. I make sure the vinegar is thoroughly rinsed away, put the conditioned water in her bowl and arrange the ‘landscape’ for her before gently pouring her from her holding cup back into the bowl. Then I lift a the whole filled bowl and put it back in it’s place right above and in front of my computer desk. Sometimes I put my headphones on her bowl and play sweet, calm music for her. Her favorite is, “Ocean Song”, from Yes singer Jon Anderson’s solo album, “Olias of Sunhillow”; it features a lot of subsonics and she plasters herself against the tiny speaker to enjoy the nice vibes. She gets about five minutes of music a day. Her bowl sits on a sheet painted with florescent paint that gives off a faint moonlight glow during the night.
She seems healthy and happy, even in her one-gallon bowl. I really like my little Lambchop, and I like to think she likes me. She pushes her face up to stare at me through the glass with her big black eyes when I use the computer. She makes me happy and I hope it’s mutual.
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Old 03-16-2013, 01:27 PM   #2 
xShainax
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You will make her more happy if you get a heater and a 2.5 gallon and stop feeding her human food
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Old 03-16-2013, 01:34 PM   #3 
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Fluctuating the temperature like that in her bowl is bad. Bettas are tropical fish and require a stable temperature of at least 75-82 degrees for optimum health.

Temperatures that are too cold or fluctuate quite rapidly in only a short amount of time can compromise the digestive system of the betta and cause a lot of stress. Stress is one of the main triggers for disease in fish, and you are practically going to be inviting in things such as ich and velvet, which can kill a fish and take weeks to eradicate.

While people can keep their bettas in unheated bowls for years, this is due more to the individual betta's hardiness and is not something that should be emulated.

Also depending on the size of the bowl you may not be doing enough water changes. Ammonia can build up quickly in a small volume of water and this burns the gills and skin of your fish. There is no way they can build an immunity to ammonia. They either suffer the effects of it or they die.
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Old 03-16-2013, 01:54 PM   #4 
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EDIT: LittleBettaFish beat me to it.


I get that you think you are spoiling your betta, but bettas don't need fiber. They're carnivores (well, primarily insectivores) by nature. I think fiber can actually damage their digestive system. That is why it is not recommended to feed bettas peas to prevent bloating like it is done with goldfish and some other fish species. Look for a brand of good quality betta food, like Omega One.

Please get her a heater. Bettas are tropical fish and should be kept between 76-82 degrees Fahrenheit, at all times. The tank water should be kept at a stable temperature without too many fluctuations. She will not live a long healthy, active life in an unheated tank.

What size is your tank exactly? The smaller the size, the more frequent water changes you should be doing. Otherwise, waste will build up and can lead to all sorts of ugly diseases.

Last edited by Fenghuang; 03-16-2013 at 02:07 PM.
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Old 03-16-2013, 03:43 PM   #5 
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See, the title of my post means I'm aware that I'm breaking the 'rules'. About temperature: Don't wild bettas sun themselves in warm sunny shallows and then swim into much cooler shaded or deeper water to hunt? About foods: Don't they eat meat scraps dropped by non-aquatic predators?
I try to make up for her admittedly small environment by keeping it very clean and providing various kinds of (hopefully enjoyable) stimulation. Would my one fish benefit that much from a large tank? I'm leery of them. How many posts are here saying equipment meant to clean and circulate water in fishtanks have mangled or killed their pets?
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Old 03-16-2013, 03:53 PM   #6 
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You are going to kill your fish. Don't come crying to us because you didn't listen to us. I am not going to feel sorry for you.
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Old 03-16-2013, 03:59 PM   #7 
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Filters that are not properly baffled did that, your fish is not healthy,
His diet is bad your fish is not a wild it has been bred for looks not survival, there needs are much different.
Your betta should be in a 2.5 at least with a heater, your little gravy boat is not a good idea as it does not even heat up and maintain the temp properly.
The temp changes are stressing her out. Don't come back crying if she dies.
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Old 03-16-2013, 04:00 PM   #8 
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LittleBettaFish, who responded before me, is the resident wild betta expert by general consensus. She would know what is best for raising wild bettas. But even if that were true, your crowntail betta is not a wild betta. Hundreds of years of human domestication and selective breeding have altered them. They would not be able to survive in wild conditions (which would still include warm, humid temperatures year round anyway, so unless you live in the tropics, you can not mimick that without a heater).

Bettas do not need a filter. They can make do with relatively small habitats, provided that their water is kept clean. They can tolerate a lot. Indeed, they are fairly undemanding fish to keep. But they need a heater to thrive.

Last edited by Fenghuang; 03-16-2013 at 04:16 PM.
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Old 03-16-2013, 04:18 PM   #9 
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Like everyone has said your betta is not wild. You would most likely have to go back years and years before you even hit a wild ancestor. Domesticated splendens are a totally different creature from the bettas you see out in places such as Thailand and Indonesia.

Also a bowl is vastly different from the complex ecosystems that wild bettas inhabit. Your comparison is like me comparing my dogs in their backyard to the wolves living wild in Yellowstone National Park.

Even my wild bettas have to have temperatures from low to mid seventies. If you go lower, they start to become lethargic, hide a lot more and their colouring fades. I left my heater unplugged the other day and the resulting temperature fluctuation was enough to cause my fry to become infected with ich.

Unless your room or house is kept at 82-84 (water is always a few degrees cooler than room temperature) degrees consistently, a heater is a necessary part of keeping bettas.
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Old 03-16-2013, 05:09 PM   #10 
MattsBettas
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In the wild, bettas do bask in the sun- but they are wild bettas, and you also have to remember that they have a pond with many different temperatures to choose from. In the tiny little bowl you are keeping her in, you are probably overheating the bowl and you are causing stressful temperature swings. Bettas do not eat meat. They eat insects. The fat in meat is to hard (saturated) for them to properly digest. To my knowledge bettas do not eat tuna, pigs, or chicken. You are going to kill your fish.
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