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Old 03-27-2013, 03:38 PM   #1 
jadaBlu
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Anyone have pics of mycobacteria lesions?

There is one fish I'd like to get that has yellow lesions on both of his gills which I assumed are from overexposure to ammonia at the box store. The fish otherwise stilll looks heathy and and responsive. It's a very large veiltail style- so large I think it must be a cross with a king. It's white with blue fins. It's been in bad conditions for at least two weeks now. I know the water has been changed at some point because it's water would be dirtier. I've read the mybacteria posts and I am reconsidering. I have several tanks so it's not just one fish to consider.
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:17 PM   #2 
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If the fish is healthy and responsive and not showing any of the other signs of myco, then the lesions could be from ammonia exposure or even wounds. Try clean water and Kordon Fish Protector or API Stress Coat and avoid cross contaminating with any other fish in case he starts to show symptoms.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:29 PM   #3 
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The following is an excerpt from an excellent article: Mycobacterial Infections of Fish:

"Mycobacterium causes a chronic disease, usually characterized by wasting. It should be suspected when fish are in poor condition and also have scale loss, skin ulcers, or a history of reproductive problems. Occasionally, deep hemorrhagic skin lesions will be seen in addition to the more common superficial lesions. Because the disease can masquerade as a number of other conditions, samples should be taken from any fish showing signs of chronic disease or reproductive problems and analyzed with bench-top acid-fast staining.

The typical lesion caused by mycobacteriosis is granulomatous inflammation. Granulomas (Fig. 1) signify the body’s effort to isolate an irritant or foreign body of some sort. Typically, granulomas are recognized by the appearance of a wall of tissue around the area where the bacteria are active. Granulomas are often seen during microscopic examination of infected tissues, but in advanced cases
they may be visible to the unaided eye (Fig. 2). Although considered typical of the disease, granulomas do not develop in all cases."


Fig 1 is a slide of granulomas shown under a microscope.
Fig 2 is a photo of a fish's spleen, taken during a dissection of an infected fish.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:39 PM   #4 
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With regard to ammonia, I found this: Chronic Toxicity of Ammonia to Rainbow Trout

Lesions were found to be common at ammonia concentrations of 0.02 mg/liter and higher.

"The gill lesions we noted are typical of those found by other workers studying the effects of ammonia on fishes.... Resulting gill lesions may cause reduced oxygen diffusion across membranes and predispose fishes to bacterial infections. Fishes exposed to increased metabolic ammonia in hatcheries are known to be more susceptible to bacterial gill disease....

Reduced growth, and lesions in gill and liver tissues, of rainbow trout exposed to concentrations of 0.017 mg/liter NH,for periods of 9 to 12
months have been reported...."

Last edited by LittleBlueFishlets; 03-27-2013 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:44 PM   #5 
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Based on the above two articles, lesions on the gills sound more like ammonia poisoning, IMO. (But the only way to really know for sure is to send a sample to a lab for analysis...)
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:45 PM   #6 
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The lesions or sores look like yellowish warts. I am thinking about photographing it and perhaps trying to get the water changed at the store and posting photos here rather than bringing the fish home. I have bought another fish from this store recently so even if I don't bring this fish home I am curious to know because it probably came from the same supplier as did another fish I have. Both seem to be doing well.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:59 PM   #7 
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Can you set him up in a QT tank, not near the other tanks?
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Old 03-27-2013, 11:55 PM   #8 
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He would be in his own small tank but likely in the same small room. My house is drafty (from cold or heat) in many places so I have lots of room but trouble locating the fish in ideal conditions.
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Old 03-28-2013, 12:57 AM   #9 
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Often before myco lesions start, the fish exhibit the other symptoms first such as lethargy and emaciation and wasting away despite eating. I would say if the fish is not oddly thin, then it's ammonia poisoning. If the fish had even a slight open wound, the ammonia poisoning could have caused a secondary bacterial infection, creating the ulcers on his gills.
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