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Old 11-22-2008, 08:29 AM   #1 
xyellowdaisyx
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Thinking about getting a Betta Fish (:

So, I asked my parents about it for christmas. They said I could get it if I work for it and I did all my research and I think this is all I need. Could someone help me out?

Tank: Eclipse System 3 - Has built in filter+ light
Filter cartridges
Gravel - Topfin assorted
Food - Omega 1 Betta Buffet
Plastic plants - Top fin hygrophilia plants.
Topfin Betta conditioner

Is there anything else I need? And can someone give me some pointers for a new betta owner?
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Old 11-22-2008, 08:43 AM   #2 
aunt kymmie
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A heater! Bettas require a constant 78 degrees in order to stay healthy & thrive.
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Old 11-22-2008, 08:52 AM   #3 
xyellowdaisyx
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Okay! Could you suggest one? Any specific ones that betas like? I heard they don't like strong currents so I don't really know what ones to get since I am a first time owner.
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Old 11-22-2008, 08:54 AM   #4 
dramaqueen
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Silk plants would be better than plastic because plastic can tear a betta's fins. You can run a piece of pantyhose over the plastic plants and if the pantyhose snags, then go with the silk plants. It sounds like you are all set. Good luck!
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Old 11-22-2008, 08:54 AM   #5 
aunt kymmie
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Heaters don't produce currents so no need to worry about that. I have an Eclipse 6 and use a Marineland Stealth heater which I'm very happy with.
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Old 11-22-2008, 09:11 AM   #6 
xyellowdaisyx
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Alrighty (:
And for tank cleanage - about how many times do I have to do it a week and how do I do it? Will I have to not clean it as much because of the filter?
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Old 11-22-2008, 09:13 AM   #7 
aunt kymmie
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I do a 20% water change weekly on my tank, no matter what my water parameters show. I use a siphon with a gravel vac attachment on the end. Remove 20% of the water and then refill with water (treated with Prime0 that has been warmed to the exact degree of the tank.
Will you get a liquid test kit and are you planning on cycling the tank??
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Old 11-22-2008, 09:18 AM   #8 
xyellowdaisyx
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I'll probably get a liquid test kit and what's cycling?
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Old 11-22-2008, 09:24 AM   #9 
aunt kymmie
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Quote:
"Cycling" a tank is the process of culturing colonies of beneficial bacteria in your tank. Fish waste (urine and feces), decaying plant and animal tissue and decaying fish food all create ammonia in your tank. Ammonia is highly toxic to fish and can kill them even at low concentrations. In order for your fish to survive in a fish tank, they can't be exposed to ammonia. Luckily, there is a type of bacteria that converts the harmful ammonia into another chemical called nitrite. As ammonia is introduced to your tank (either by adding fish or another ammonia source) these bacteria multiply. Eventually, there are enough of them to completely convert any ammonia that is introduced to the tank into nitrite. Unfortunately, nitrite is just as toxic to your fish as ammonia, if not moreso. However, there is a second type of bacteria that converts this nitrite into nitrate, a chemical that is only harmful to fish in very large concentrations. As the first type of bacteria convert ammonia to nitrite, the second type of bacteria begins to grow in number. After more time, there are enough of these bacteria present to convert all of your nitrite into nitrate. After both types of bacteria are established, your tank is "cycled." At this point, you should never have detectable levels of ammonia or nitrite in your tank and you only need to do water changes to keep the nitrate levels in check.

There are two ways to cycle a tank, fishless and with fish. When cycling with fish, the fish you add act as the ammonia source during the cycle. However, because the ammonia and nitrite that are produced during the cycle are toxic, you need to do water changes frequently when cycling with fish to keep them alive. The second way is to cycle without fish and use some other ammonia source, such as pure ammonia, fish food or even an uncooked shrimp. This is the preferred method as it allows you to stock the tank as you please (instead of with the fish you cycled with) and also doesn't subject any fish to ammonia or nitrite poisoning.

The best way to monitor the progress of the cycle is to get a good liquid test kit like the API Freshwater Master Test Kit. It contains tests for pH as well as ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. Testing the water lets you know exactly how far along the cycle is and when it's over, and therefore when it's safe to add fish.

Since the bacteria that you grow during the cycle aren't waterborne (they live on surfaces in the aquarium like the gravel, decor and especially the filter media) you can transfer some of these items over to a cycling aquarium from an established tank to help speed up your cycle.
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Old 11-22-2008, 02:25 PM   #10 
xyellowdaisyx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aunt kymmie View Post
Quote:
"Cycling" a tank is the process of culturing colonies of beneficial bacteria in your tank. Fish waste (urine and feces), decaying plant and animal tissue and decaying fish food all create ammonia in your tank. Ammonia is highly toxic to fish and can kill them even at low concentrations. In order for your fish to survive in a fish tank, they can't be exposed to ammonia. Luckily, there is a type of bacteria that converts the harmful ammonia into another chemical called nitrite. As ammonia is introduced to your tank (either by adding fish or another ammonia source) these bacteria multiply. Eventually, there are enough of them to completely convert any ammonia that is introduced to the tank into nitrite. Unfortunately, nitrite is just as toxic to your fish as ammonia, if not moreso. However, there is a second type of bacteria that converts this nitrite into nitrate, a chemical that is only harmful to fish in very large concentrations. As the first type of bacteria convert ammonia to nitrite, the second type of bacteria begins to grow in number. After more time, there are enough of these bacteria present to convert all of your nitrite into nitrate. After both types of bacteria are established, your tank is "cycled." At this point, you should never have detectable levels of ammonia or nitrite in your tank and you only need to do water changes to keep the nitrate levels in check.

There are two ways to cycle a tank, fishless and with fish. When cycling with fish, the fish you add act as the ammonia source during the cycle. However, because the ammonia and nitrite that are produced during the cycle are toxic, you need to do water changes frequently when cycling with fish to keep them alive. The second way is to cycle without fish and use some other ammonia source, such as pure ammonia, fish food or even an uncooked shrimp. This is the preferred method as it allows you to stock the tank as you please (instead of with the fish you cycled with) and also doesn't subject any fish to ammonia or nitrite poisoning.

The best way to monitor the progress of the cycle is to get a good liquid test kit like the API Freshwater Master Test Kit. It contains tests for pH as well as ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. Testing the water lets you know exactly how far along the cycle is and when it's over, and therefore when it's safe to add fish.

Since the bacteria that you grow during the cycle aren't waterborne (they live on surfaces in the aquarium like the gravel, decor and especially the filter media) you can transfer some of these items over to a cycling aquarium from an established tank to help speed up your cycle.
'


Okay so what you're saying is; I fill the tank with water, put in all the stuff except for fish,(purifying stuff, hiding spots, plants) put in like fish food pellets and turn on the filter and wait for 1-3 weeks? Or until the cycle is over? What are the signals that my tank is ready for fish?
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