Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Care
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-22-2008, 07:09 PM   #11 
Kim
Member
 
Kim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
May I suggest that you use pure ammonia instead of fish food. It is much less messy, believe me as I have done it both ways. Also, with the pure ammonia you can spike it up right away while the fish food takes a while to even produce ammonia making the entire process take longer. Basically, you add ammonia daily and test every few days until you have 0 ammonia and nitrites, and a reading for nitrate. If your ammonia reading starts to get really high, over 5ppm, then just stop adding ammonia until it starts to go down. It is not an exact science, just do what works, add a little ammonia and test a few hours later, this will give you a feel for how much you should add. Because there is no fish in the tank it is really not something to overly stress about so long as the cycle does complete. Before you add fish you will need to do a large water change to bring the nitrates down to acceptable levels. As long as you don't clean the filter or vaccuum the gravel (another reason that I suggest ammonia instead of fish food is that it doesn't gunk up the gravel which would then require cleaning) the tank will be fine bacteria wise.

If you have any questions during the process feel free to ask :)
Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2008, 07:23 AM   #12 
xyellowdaisyx
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim View Post
May I suggest that you use pure ammonia instead of fish food. It is much less messy, believe me as I have done it both ways. Also, with the pure ammonia you can spike it up right away while the fish food takes a while to even produce ammonia making the entire process take longer. Basically, you add ammonia daily and test every few days until you have 0 ammonia and nitrites, and a reading for nitrate. If your ammonia reading starts to get really high, over 5ppm, then just stop adding ammonia until it starts to go down. It is not an exact science, just do what works, add a little ammonia and test a few hours later, this will give you a feel for how much you should add. Because there is no fish in the tank it is really not something to overly stress about so long as the cycle does complete. Before you add fish you will need to do a large water change to bring the nitrates down to acceptable levels. As long as you don't clean the filter or vaccuum the gravel (another reason that I suggest ammonia instead of fish food is that it doesn't gunk up the gravel which would then require cleaning) the tank will be fine bacteria wise.

If you have any questions during the process feel free to ask :)

Woah O_O Okay, So I have it down. Alright. You can buy pure ammonia in stores, correct? I'm pretty young so I don't know if my mom will let me handle the ammonia but I'll try to persuade her. Heh; this is alot more work than I expected for one betta. But I want it to live a good life so I'm gonna do all these things.
xyellowdaisyx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 08:03 PM   #13 
Kim
Member
 
Kim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Yup, I got mine at Hannaford, so if your mom goes grocery shopping you could just ask her nicely to pick some up for you ;) Remember, you want 100% pure ammonia (doesn't matter the concentration) with no perfumes or other chemical additives. Just hold your breath while putting the drops in because you really don't want to breathe that stuff in!

I'm really glad that you care so much about your fish! It really will be worth it in the long run. I really do believe that larger, cycled tanks are the way to go. I mean, my guy (in a cycled, heated, filtered 5.5 gal.) is eating and flaring immediately after a water change. It really is the most low-stress situation possible :)
Kim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2008, 11:44 PM   #14 
iamntbatman
Member
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Maryland
Pure ammonia can be difficult to track down but I've heard it's sold at Ace Hardware. I've never used this method as I haven't been able to find the stuff near me. Plus, you have to keep dosing it. When you've got a lot of fish tanks, it can be hard to remember to do stuff like that. I've personally used uncooked shrimp to cycle a lot of my tanks. Just put one in a piece of pantyhose (or a filter media bag which should be available at Petsmart or any fish store and is probably cheaper than pantyhose) and throw it in your tank. As it rots, it will create a constant supply of ammonia. There's really nothing more to it other than to test your water to know how the cycle is progressing.

If I were setting up a new betta tank, this would be my shopping list:

-Test kit - $18 (this is extremely important. You need it to know how the cycle is progressing and is pretty much an essential tool for all fishkeepers. Don't get the paper test strips! They're inaccurate and actually more expensive. This test kit goes for about $30 or more in stores so it's better to buy online):
Freshwater Master Test Kit

-A plain ol' 10g glass tank from Petsmart for about $11 or $12 (5.5g tanks cost about the same, but the bigger the better, so why not a 10g?)

-A filter with an adjustable flow rate like this one ($13):
Whisper In-Tank Filter 10i - 90 gph

-A heater like this one ($17):
Visi-Therm Stealth Heater - 50W - 8 3/4 in. - up to 15 gallon

-Glass canopy ($10):
20" Glass Canopy (Perfecto)

-A strip fluorescent light from Home Depot (~$10)

-Gravel or sand (you can buy a 50lb bag of play sand at Home Depot for like $4 and it looks great...just rinse it really well before you add it to the tank)

-Silk plants (or live plants like java fern and java moss)

-A piece of driftwood or two

-Some pieces of slate from a landscaping store to make some caves (bettas love caves!)

-A net

-A gravel vaccum

-Water conditioner (Tetra Aquasafe or Prime are great)

-Fish food (Hikari Bio-Gold pellets as a staple diet, frozen bloodworms for twice weekly treats)

-Thermometer


That's it, really. The initial setup is somewhat expensive but the long-term upkeep is really, really cheap. A 10g tank would allow you to keep your betta fish along with a shoal of six or so corydoras catfish, which make great tankmates and are really funny little fish. The 10g tank, canopy, filter and lights comes to $45, which is the same price the Eclipse 3 runs for. Plus, the Eclipse filter tends to be pretty strong which can bug bettas.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thinking bout a Betta tank rachel1811 Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 2 04-19-2010 02:42 PM
Thinking about getting a betta Cyrmu Betta Fish Care 12 04-10-2010 02:20 PM
thinking of getting a betta... molliefan09 Betta Fish Care 21 10-23-2009 01:17 PM
Thinking about a Betta tank InsaneoMan Betta Fish Compatibility 14 12-11-2008 09:25 PM
Thinking about adding a Betta... coley Betta Fish Care 8 08-24-2007 09:20 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.