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Old 06-11-2013, 09:09 PM   #1 
lillyandquigly
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What's a good breed to breed?

I finally got myself a job so now I'm really thinking about getting a little part of my savings going for breeding bettas. I'm still learning so it'll be a while. Is there a certain breed that's the best? I already know I want to breed butterflies.
I'm thinking of Hm's, are those a good breed to breed? Sorry if I end up bothering you with all of my questions. Is there a special live food that helps them develop the most? Or should I use a large variation? Are there any reputable breeders I could buy from that sell butterflies? I'm not thinking now, it'll probably be more like a year from now. Thanks, Lillian
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:20 PM   #2 
MattsBettas
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What "breed" you breed is up to you... What do you like best? Work in that tail type. Hmpk is my favorite, but some people prefer hm, ct, etc. Usually it is not suggested to breed veiltails because you will have a very hard time selling them, but if your goal is to improve the type and sent some to shows to try to get them classed, go for it.

Quality fish can be ordered off aquabid.

The two staple live foods for fry are baby brine shrimp and microworms, but there are others, like vinegar eels. Feeding a variation is best.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:28 PM   #3 
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Breed? You mean variation? Because they are all the same breed.
I bred butterflies as well! I am trying to make very clean colors with butterfly rims on giants. I think it makes a flashy fish and therefore something I can readily find homes for. I do not have the type of water it takes for good quality crown tails and I don't care for VT's or DT's. I do like spade tails, delta tails and halfmoons.

I'm going to try my hand at yellows this year!

Make the most of your money buy finding your supplies/tanks etc. as cheaply as possible so you can buy good quality stock.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:31 PM   #4 
lillyandquigly
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I'd like to breed all of them, if only. Halfmoons are probably my favorite, because of the one I rescued from my sister. I know I don't have all of the things I need. Should I post what I have and then you could post what I need?
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:32 PM   #5 
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Sure!
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:37 PM   #6 
lillyandquigly
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Ok:
Heater
Fifteen gallon tank
21.75 gallon tank
Filter
A little glass log cave thing with many entrances and exits
A few plastic plants
A ton of glass mason jars
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:51 PM   #7 
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Well you are in great shape! One more heater, a few thermometers, a divider for one of the tanks to house the parents, a sponge filter for the spawn/fry tank, 1/2 of a styrofoam cup, a few cultures of fry food(unless you wanna do egg yolks)and a nice pair of betta and you have a bare bones breeding operation!
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Old 06-11-2013, 10:33 PM   #8 
lillyandquigly
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I think I'll need another tank because the 21 gallon is the grow out and the 15 would be the breeding tank. So I think I'd get another 15, unless the breeder would work for a permanent home for the male after they're done and he goes back when he's done?
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Old 06-12-2013, 09:44 AM   #9 
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You can use the 21 as the spawn tank and the growout by just leaving the fry in there. You can use the 15 as permanent housing for the pair. Unless you just want another tank right away...
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:19 AM   #10 
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I would recommend not using the 21 gallon as a spawning tank, unless you use a small(er) container inside the 21 gallon..

For breeding you will want to start with:

Anywhere from 5-10 gallons if you go with the glass tank to spawn in.
You can spawn in 5 gallon buckets (I usually don't recommend that to new breeders as it's hard to see the babies and look for deformities).
Can also breed in smallish plastic bins (Rubbermaid and Sterilite are the brands most recommended as they tend to be food grade, which will be safe for live animals). Similar to this type.

The larger the tank you breed in the more spread out the food will be and for a while after hatching, the fry dart here and there rather than actually swim and some will actually starve if they can't find enough food.. to make sure they find enough food you will end up over feeding them, which will lead to water fouling up quicker and going through your food much faster. Also you will need to be doing daily water changes, and using a small airline siphon to vacuum up everything off the bottom and to siphon the water for the first few weeks - month+ will be so annoying and time consuming in a larger tank. Why it's usually recommended no bigger than 10 gallons with a few inches of water to breed in as the largest size to breed in. Another reason is it's harder to get a pair to breed in a large space - the pair will stay on opposite ends and will keep getting out of "breeding" mode, etc.

You will need a grow out tank - depending on how many you have it will determine the size(s) of the grow outs.. a 21 gallon is fine for a smaller spawn (20 gallon LONG is usually the smallest recommended.. anything smaller you will need multiples of). I use multiple 29 gallons.. one of my spawns had to be divided up between them as I ended up with 550+ fry from a single spawn. So keep in mind you will sometimes have a large spawn, sometimes a smaller one and you will need to house them safely and healthy until you start to cull them or jar them. I would recommend at least 1 more tank of 29g size to add with the 21 gallon grow out tank. Depending how much you want to breed, if you want to go with more than 1 spawn at a time, or growing at a time (at minimum of 3 months you will be growing them per spawn) you will want at least another large tank. But if you are happy with spawning once every 2 months or so then the 21g and 29g will be fine..

Heaters for all the tanks, remember to get larger wattage for larger tanks and make sure they are all adjustable as you will want certain temps to breed/grow out in.

Sponge filters - don't use any other filter with them for the first couple months (or at all really). Sponge filters along with the air pump, airline hoses and air control valves.

IAL, live plants (not needed, but very highly recommended as it provides food for newborn fry, and helps with overall water quality), a couple snails (I would advise having only one snail per tank to avoid a ton of them which can bring up ammonia which is a big time killer for fry).

Depends on the size of the mason jars.. I usually recommend having at least a 100 jars/beanie containers/deli cups on hand at any given time for the juveniles.
Also you will need a way to heat them all up to the proper temps. Either with heat tape, a space heater, etc. Need to be proper temps that are stable.

Live foods.. BBS, micro cultures, worms, etc.. lots and lots of live foods.

There is so much more small stuff as well.. I would read the stickies on top of the breeding section- it's a good first step to what you will need, etc :)

Breeding is an expensive, very big time consumer and space taker.. definitely not something to take lightly. Lots of hard work and hours a day will lead to success :)
Good luck!

There are different species to the bettas, but what you are looking at is the splenden family which has multiple tail types. They will breed to one another, but better to breed the same tail type to one another until the genetics and goals are learned/determined before mixing tail types, as it can get really sloppy.. and some tail types (such as double tail) are actually deformities and can lead to body deformities easily if not careful (such as breeding a double tail to a double tail more than once, etc). Halfmoons are fine and good to breed, it's what I specialize in the most :)

Last edited by Myates; 06-12-2013 at 10:31 AM.
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