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Old 03-29-2009, 10:41 PM   #1 
Virus
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Exclamation Considering Male Crowntail Betta - Advise?

I need advise on what colors to get.
I want to get a good fish.
How expensive do this type get at Petsmart?
He'll be in a three gallon with a live plant.
What does an 'expert' look for when buying a Crowntail Betta?
I'll continue looking back at Petsmart until I find the perfect one.
How do I know if he's ill?
I'd like a beautiful, healthy fish.
Thank you.
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:01 AM   #2 
shroomer
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i am no expert but i might be able to help u a little bit. up here in canada at petsmart the betta fish are around 3.95 but a couple a 7 somthing im not sure which(perhaps the females). i am 80% sure that the crowntails are the same price as other ones.

the colours are up to u look for the colours u like or u think look pretty and go for it.

u should look at the fish closely and make sure there are no white funguses on him, make sure his scales are not raised, and look for fin rot.

like i said im no expert im still learning new stuff everyday aswell. just generaly look for somthing out of the ordinary that might be a sickness
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:07 AM   #3 
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Okay, I also read on another site to look for activeness, flaring and bright colors as signs of good health as well as not resting on the bottom and fecies that isn't stringy or white. Correct?
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:14 AM   #4 
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Choosing a Healthy Betta to Purchase | Healthy Betta

I read that and I'm wondering if this is correct imformation?
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:53 AM   #5 
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the link u sent is redirects me to leave a comment so i cant see what you are reading. it will be hard for you to choose a fish that is not resting on the bottom, this is because they are kept in such small containers that all they can really do, is be sad and sit there.
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Old 03-30-2009, 06:34 AM   #6 
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You either scroll up from that page or use this link:
Choosing a Healthy Betta to Purchase | Healthy Betta

That I am aware of.
I always get angry at my step-father.
He picks up the containers and gives them a 'Hurricane Test'..
It makes me so angry.
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Old 03-30-2009, 08:02 AM   #7 
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Look for one that is active (as active as he can be in the cup) and has a bubblenest going in his cup. Don't get one that looks sickly or floating at the top.
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Old 03-30-2009, 08:19 AM   #8 
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When looking for a betta fish from a pet store, always bring a small flash light with you. This is an invaluable tool when inspecting bettas, not only in helping to determine what color they truly are, but also in helping to spot diseases. I always bring a pen light with me when I go to a store to look at the bettas.

Crowntails are normally priced slightly higher than normal veil tails in my stores around here. My local Petsmart charges 3.89 for a VT, but 7.99 for a Crown. Then again, I would never buy a crowntail from my Petsmart, they don't take very good care of most of their fish. There are many other LFS in my area that sell Crowns for only a dollar more than their VTs (generally 2.99 a VT, 3.99 a Crown), and they are generally in infinitely better health anyhow.
And in most pet stores - the females are cheaper than the males.

The link Virus posted (just scroll up from the comment box on that page) is a good basic guide when looking for bettas. To add onto some of those sections though:
Fins: If the bettas fin edges are dark (like are dark brown to black) and look ragged and/or torn with possible slight curling, the fish may very well have fin rot. This can be cured of course with proper treatment, but this is not a healthy betta. A crowntail is distinct in that it has fin rays which extent beyond the fin webbing, which for some people makes it difficult to distinguish the difference between a fish with fin rot and a normal crowntail. A good way to confirm is to watch the betta and see if it flares (set it next to a cup with another male betta in it if it's not flaring at your presence). When it flares, look at the webbing in between the rays - they should still have smooth, un-torn edges. If they are darkened or ragged, then the crowntail probably has fin rot. Also red, inflamed looking edges on a betta (provided the betta isn't already red in color, then you won't really be able to see this) are generally a pre-cursor stage to the more severe form of fin rot with the darkened edges.

Gills: As they say, flaring is the best time to study these, but also watch as the betta breathes in it's tank. A betta whose gills don't both close evenly against the side of the body is ill. Being even is the key with gills, they should move at the same time, the same distance.

Droppings: What they said in the guide on this is really important! Bettas with white, stringy looking poo are generally ridden with internal parasites, and are unable to properly digest their food. Many of these fish die within a short time. You want a betta whose fecal matter is brownish in color.

Behavior: Other things in this category to look for include bubbles in a betta's cup. If these are present, then it is normally a good sign that the fish is coping well. Fish who persist in blowing bubbles even in tiny store cups are generally very hardy fish, and often a good choice.
A fish who hangs vertically or near vertical (tail up or tail down does not matter) likely has a swim bladder disorder of some sort - this also applies to any betta you observe which does not keep itself in an upright position, and instead leans over to one side. These are not good fish to choose, as sometimes this swim bladder damage is permanent and cannot be fixed. The betta fish should be horizontal when it swims, although you may occasionally observe them taking on a near vertical pose as they reach from the bottom of the cup to the surface for air, they should not remain this way. This is simply a pose you see because the cups are so tiny and the betta really can't move very far anyhow.

Water and other things: Clear water is better. But many pet stores never clean their betta cups out and so they are often filled with fecal matter and are often stained brown or are very murky. This is something you will have to learn to deal with in many fish stores, as they are too incompetant to ever clean the bowls. And some stores have a habit of sing blue-dyed water in their betta cups. This is annoying, and often makes bettas difficult to determine an accurate color on or inspect, hence why a flash light is so important.
Closely inspect a betta for small white spots appearing anywhere on the fish. If you see this, do not get this fish. The white spots are ich, and this is a bad disease (although not incurable). Unfortunately, some stores often just scoop the water for the betta cups out of their other tanks water, water which contains other fish which have ich - this just spreads the disease.
Also look (you'll need a flashlight for this, as you will otherwse rarely be able to get enough light in those cups to properly identify this) to see if the fish has something of a copper or gold 'dusting' across it's scales. This is velvet, another disease. You don't want this fish either.
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Old 03-30-2009, 08:20 AM   #9 
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I don't imagine, as well as being in the cup that's obviously too small for them, that the apparently amusing 'Hurricane Test' is too good for their health.
What does a bubblenest look like?
Do they only produce a bubblenest at certain times?

Last edited by Virus; 03-30-2009 at 08:24 AM.
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Old 03-30-2009, 08:28 AM   #10 
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Male betta fish produce bubble nests as a way of marking a territory and to indicate they are ready to breed. This is a commonly interpreted sign that they are relatively happy and healthy, as a sick betta will rarely expend the energy required to build a bubbly nest.
Bubble nests are generally just a gathering of bubbles on the surface of the water, usually around the edge of the cup when it comes to looking at bettas in store cups. Most of them will not be very large, but some bettas when placed in larger tanks get very carried away with this and will build some huge bubble nests.


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