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Old 10-04-2013, 12:25 AM   #1 
hollyk
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Breeders- do you recommend breeding bettas?

Hello all!

I'm considering starting to breed bettas, as I just love these fish and I love working with them. I've had several over about a 15 year time span, but never bred them. I know very little about breeding, so I intend to do a lot of research before even attempting to breed them. It's definitely not a hobby that I'll be starting tomorrow!

I'm wondering though, to people who do breed or have bred bettas, do you recommend it? I mean, do you think that it's worth the time and effort that you put into it? I guess I'm really asking you to just talk me out of it now if it's a bad idea, before I go through all the research; or talk me into it and get me really excited and dedicated to it!

I feel that I should note also that I lead a very busy lifestyle- I am a grad student, and I am typically gone several hours every day.

Thoughts on breeding? Thank you very much for reading and any advice you can offer!
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Old 10-04-2013, 12:38 AM   #2 
Aluka
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Its a great learning experience in my opinion. Its great to know how these cute little fish we have been keeping came to be and how they develop from fry to fish.

That being said. Breeding bettas takes TONS of work. If you lead a busy lifestyle. I wouldn't recommend it. You pretty much can not go on vacations in the 2-3 months after they spawn, you can't go out and stay over at your friend's or bf/gf's. You must be home pretty much everyday to feel them multiple times, daily water change, clean tank. Be there in time to start and harvest bbs.

Maybe you should come back to betta breeding once you are done with school and have a more settled lifestyle =)
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Old 10-04-2013, 12:42 AM   #3 
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I never actually go away overnights. Just gone several hours each day, but I'm home every morning and night. Do you still think it's a bad idea? Thanks!
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Old 10-04-2013, 01:14 AM   #4 
dramaqueen
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I don't think it's a bad idea as long as you can make the commitment to do the things necessary to take care of fry. Water needs changes, they need to be fed several times a day. If you're in school you may get overwhelmed with schoolwork and taking care of fry and the parents.Also, if you have an active social life you may want to consider breeding when you have more time to commit to it. But, yeah, it's a wonderful idea if you have the time and have done your research .
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Old 10-04-2013, 01:29 AM   #5 
snowflake311
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It is work but not as bad as Aluka is making it out to be. You can still have a life you just need to spend a hour or more a day on your fish no matter what for 3 months. So if you have some extra time or can make some extra time you can raise some fry. I have 3 dogs, work, and I am married with a 5 year old daughter. I have one batch of fry that are doing pretty well and are a month old tomorrow. I have have 6 other fish tanks too its a little much yes. I guess I just like to keep busy.

I too kept betta fish for like 15 years on and off. I know how you feel I have been there too. But this betta breeding thing is an addiction worst then just keeping bettas.

The key to raising fry and being busy is make it easy for yourself. I have a fish room with pumps and buckets so water changes are easy and don't take up too much time.

You just need to find a way to make the task easy. When I am cleaning out the poop and dirty water that takes time. When it comes to filling the tank back up I can just sit back and chill. You just need to keep an eye on it so if does not over flow. keep towels around! Working on my tanks is my relaxing time I love it.

I say keep reading up on it learn all you can get a good pair and do it.
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Old 10-04-2013, 02:07 AM   #6 
bambijarvis
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It's exiting, and if you love watching genetcs at play they're great.

But it's alot of work and start up can cost quite a bit.
Doing it cheaply:
$5 for a decent sized container to spawn them in($10 or so for a ten gallon spawning tank).
$5-$12 for a LARGE storage container as a grow out($20-$40 for a 20gallon long or larger tank as a grow out)
Heaters(2) you can find kinda cheap on ebay($5 each) but can't say how safe they are, other wise 14-21 each for adjustable ones.
Fry foods(May be able to find a worm culture for $4, BBS eggs are $20 give or take for a can. I can point you to a lovely starter pack with worm cultures and powder foods that I used, complete with IAL to help get your fish in the mood to breed for $24, that includes shipping cost)

you can go filterless but most set up a sponge filter($1-$7 for sponge filter, $2-$5 for air line,$1-$2 for air stone,$5-$20 for an air pump)

You'll need jars or deli/betta cups to jar your males(price will vary alot depending on how many and if you go for glass jars or plastic deli cups, but I'd say buy at least 25 of whichever, more might be recommended on the off chance you have an all male spawn larger than 25).

Then there's the actual Fish. if you go the pet store route, avoid VTs.
Most stores won't carry HM females, but alot carry CT girls.
Going by petsmart prices:
HM pair:$17-$20
CT pair:$5-$6
You can usually find people selling their fry here on forum from their spawn. Generally priced are $5-$20 per fish depending on quality(better than what you'll find at the pet store) and on top of that add $12-$30 for shipping(priority vs next day).

Conditioning your pair: I used live black worm, $2 an ounce, only need one ounce,maybe two if the first dies and you need to re condition them because the spawn failed.

On the topic of conditioning...
basics like water conditioner($2-$8), food($2-$6), fish net($1-$5), water test kit($17-$30)some where to house the fish before/after they spawn(either 2 smaller tanks or a divided six-ten gallon tank)........

Start up is costly,but most of that stuff you'll reuse and only need to buy once. if you've kept fish you probably already have a lot of it.

And time...you'll be doing a LOT of water changes....xD
But yeah I totes recommend it.
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Old 10-04-2013, 06:59 AM   #7 
Ilikebutterflies
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No recommendations here. I feel like if you do your homework...first and foremost learning about genetics, then breeding, fry care then basic fish keeping...you will be able to answer your own question. You are going to have to ask yourself if you are up for the job. Do you have time to do a 50% water change at least every other day for two solid months?
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Old 10-04-2013, 12:34 PM   #8 
hollyk
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Thank you all very much for your help! First step is the research, of course. But once I know what I'm doing, and when I feel that I'm up to the challenge, I might just go for it. :)
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Old 10-04-2013, 08:49 PM   #9 
Aluka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowflake311 View Post
It is work but not as bad as Aluka is making it out to be. You can still have a life you just need to spend a hour or more a day on your fish no matter what for 3 months. So if you have some extra time or can make some extra time you can raise some fry. I have 3 dogs, work, and I am married with a 5 year old daughter. I have one batch of fry that are doing pretty well and are a month old tomorrow. I have have 6 other fish tanks too its a little much yes. I guess I just like to keep busy.

I too kept betta fish for like 15 years on and off. I know how you feel I have been there too. But this betta breeding thing is an addiction worst then just keeping bettas.

The key to raising fry and being busy is make it easy for yourself. I have a fish room with pumps and buckets so water changes are easy and don't take up too much time.

You just need to find a way to make the task easy. When I am cleaning out the poop and dirty water that takes time. When it comes to filling the tank back up I can just sit back and chill. You just need to keep an eye on it so if does not over flow. keep towels around! Working on my tanks is my relaxing time I love it.

I say keep reading up on it learn all you can get a good pair and do it.
I'm not making it out to be worst than it is, I am considering it in the perspective of a graduate student in her early 20s.

You are a mom, you work, you go home and be with your kid. Your life is probably busier than hers, but alot more predictable.

She is in grad school, which means she has class, projects, exams, research, etc etc, she probably works also. She is likely also in her early 20s. Which includes alot of all day out with friends, trips to other cities, staying over at friends, a less predictable social life.

Maybe that's not how the op is, but i dont know the op, i am guessing according to the average early 20 female.

I'm in my mid-late 20s, my life is starting to settle and become more predictable. I started my first breeding. But 2-3 years earlier? school, work and friends? i am not sure i could have balance that if i added fish fry to the mix. Just between school and work, there were days where i was so busy i forget to feed myself, much less feeding my fry. Some days, my professors will just randomly come in and say oh why dont you write up something and show me what you have tomorrow? Instant all nighter putting graphs and pictures together. (I was in biochem, maybe op has a less work load course , I don't know. Like i said guessing here)

Like i said, if you have lots of free time. Go for it, its a great learning experience. But if you lead a busy lifestyle like you said. Focus on on finishing your master, enjoy your betas. Breed them later. You have plenty of time, no need to add extra stress during one of the more important period of your life.

Last edited by Aluka; 10-04-2013 at 08:52 PM.
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Old 10-04-2013, 09:43 PM   #10 
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Don't forget, you need to find homes for all of the babies. You could end up with 100+ without a home.
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