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Old 04-14-2010, 06:08 PM   #21 
PinkDiamond
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Originally Posted by secuono View Post
I don't understand why people buy 'betta food.' Just buy tropical fish flakes, give frozen blood worms and his will be very happy.
I have to disagree with this. Bettas are strictly carnivores - they feed on insects and zooplankton only in the wild. Tropical fish flakes are formulated with plant matter as well as protein sources, and bettas have absolutely no use for plant matter. A pellet specifically formulated for bettas is totally necessary if you're not feeding them frozen/live foods, like daphnia, glassworms, bloodworms, tubifex worms, brine shrimp or mysis shrimp

I strongly agree with a minimum of a 2.5 gallon tank as well - all of my bettas are in 5 gallons or more and are better off for it. A dog will survive if kept in it's kennel it's entire life and never let out to move, but that doesn't mean it's ok. Bettas are not sedentary fish - they are meant to swim around, and can do so quite quickly, so it's only fair that they be given a tank with room to do this.

Best of luck with your betta!
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:28 PM   #22 
Mister Sparkle
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A dog will survive if kept in it's kennel it's entire life and never let out to move, but that doesn't mean it's ok.
This analogy sounds good, but it is hardly the same thing. Keeping a dog in a kennel will cause serious physical problems in a very short amount of time. Keeping a betta in a 1/2-gallon bowl won't. Again, your desire to have your fish in something larger is admirable, and makes for more manageable care on your part. I'm glad that you feel that you are providing the best care possible for your fish. That's great!

But no false analogy or slippery slope is going to get us around the fact that a small space doesn't hurt bettas. The best argument you can use to recommend a larger aquarium is that it will be easier to heat properly, and that it will be less labor-intensive on the keeper. Trying to equate it to cruelty is just dishonest.
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:39 PM   #23 
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My Betta doesnt like pellets either. Seems he has a hard time eating them, and his poop is HUGE :(

I feed mine the Betta Flakes and worm combo. He seems to like it....altho the more i read the more i want to try home made food for him. He is a little on the small side.
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Old 04-14-2010, 06:40 PM   #24 
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For your (Mister Sparkle) previous post, I have no problem with breeders using smaller containers because, well, they know what they're doing. Drip systems and/or clean FRESH water. I agree with what you said about what they do. However they're not housed in them permanently, they are simply kept in there for simplicity of the breeder. 100 2.5 gallons? Unfavorable, but I would imagine most of us thing the same thing.

I get what you're saying and you have your strong points on it. However, my opinion stands - I prefer to keep bettas in larger tanks for their physical needs (and yes, I say needs, muahahaha!).

I'm glad you raised that point though. It's good for a betta owner to see both sides of the "tank-that-is-too-small?" story, although I will drag them to the larger side anyways ;)


Also, if anyone can explain "large poop size", I'd love to know what causes the size of poop as well. Off topic, but still curious, haha.
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Old 04-14-2010, 07:03 PM   #25 
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Originally Posted by Mister Sparkle View Post
This analogy sounds good, but it is hardly the same thing. Keeping a dog in a kennel will cause serious physical problems in a very short amount of time. Keeping a betta in a 1/2-gallon bowl won't. Again, your desire to have your fish in something larger is admirable, and makes for more manageable care on your part. I'm glad that you feel that you are providing the best care possible for your fish. That's great!

But no false analogy or slippery slope is going to get us around the fact that a small space doesn't hurt bettas. The best argument you can use to recommend a larger aquarium is that it will be easier to heat properly, and that it will be less labor-intensive on the keeper. Trying to equate it to cruelty is just dishonest.
What. There are a number of problems, physical or not, that come with this misconception you're supporting; that small spaces don't hurt bettas and promoting the effort to upgrade is only a selfish endeavor which serves no purpose other than to benefit the owner, not the fish itself.

How often do you walk into a pet store and see bright, jubilant bettas swimming about their pint-sized containers looking how they're supposed to? You don't. Deprived of any area to swim (how ironic), bettas become listless and bleak - obvious indications that their prosperity is severely stifled. It's undeniable, and to say otherwise is ignorant.

Your condescension aside, it certainly is admirable to want to provide the most for your betta. The only thing cruel and dishonest here is your input.
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Old 04-14-2010, 07:16 PM   #26 
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He's in a 1 gallon tank with a light and less powerful pump now.

Last edited by sega dude; 04-14-2010 at 07:34 PM.
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Old 04-14-2010, 07:32 PM   #27 
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I'd like to clarify that I'm all for practical setups for breeders as long as they're able to meet conditional requirements - which they do. They're kept under said conditions with the intent to sell and / or relocate.

The issue I have is with those advocating these same conditions as a means of permanently housing a betta.
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Old 04-14-2010, 08:19 PM   #28 
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careful with the light Sega, depends on what kind u have but it could raise the temp enough during the day that when u shut it off at night its too much of a temp drop.

XXabc lmao....true right? ive only had this problem with pellets...i didnt think they were digesting properly. -shrugs- not sure tho....
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Old 04-14-2010, 10:28 PM   #29 
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Incandescent lights have reputation to slowly raise tank temperatures the longer they're left on, if that's what you're talking about.

I'm not sure it's indigestion though, they don't seem to have any symptoms of bloating/constipation or anything. Scary stuff, lol!

Kittles +1
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Old 04-15-2010, 12:46 PM   #30 
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Originally Posted by Kittles View Post
How often do you walk into a pet store and see bright, jubilant bettas swimming about their pint-sized containers looking how they're supposed to? You don't. Deprived of any area to swim (how ironic), bettas become listless and bleak - obvious indications that their prosperity is severely stifled. It's undeniable, and to say otherwise is ignorant.

The only thing cruel and dishonest here is your input.
We aren't talking about 1-pint cup here. We're talking about 1/2-gallon + (that would be quadruple the size you are discussing, and up). Furthermore, what you see in your pet store is not an example of adequate care. It would be a stretch to even consider it "bare minimum" care. The appearance you describe is more appropriately ascribed to poor water quality and inadequate heat than to the size of the cup. Your false sense of superiority aside, it really boils down to managing conditions. No betta I've ever kept could be described as "listless and bleak." And that includes volumes ranging from 1/2-gallon to 40 Gallons. In that 40-gallon, I often had 2 or more males in the same aquarium, with no aggression difficulties...that's another one of the "rules" which aren't necessarily written in stone.

With all due respect, you can hop down off your high horse and go kick rocks, kiddo!
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