Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-06-2010, 06:18 PM   #11 
Starbright
Member
 
Starbright's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: California
Bettas are probably one of the only fish that can live in a non cycled tank. They're pretty amazing :O!! That's how they live in those nasty little cups and horrible 10oz "tanks"! I agree with Lola. As long as you keep up with water changes, your betta will be perfectly fine in a 2.5 uncycled tank :)

(I'm pretty sure that's what most people on this forum do!)
Starbright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 06:31 PM   #12 
Terranariko
Member
 
Terranariko's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada,N.B
Quote:
Originally Posted by LolaQuigs View Post
It's hard for a 2.5 gallon tank to hold a cycle. But as long as you do frequent water changes your conditions will be fine without cycling.
So as long as I do water changes durning the cycle? or after I get the fish?...

Edit: Oh it seems beta's can live in uncycled water...thats nice to know...but I'll try to cycle it a bit anyway...better then doing noting to the water at all.

Last edited by Terranariko; 05-06-2010 at 06:37 PM.
Terranariko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 06:38 PM   #13 
Mister Sparkle
Member
 
Mister Sparkle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starbright View Post
It's pretty hard to cycle a 2.5 gallon
Ummm...no it isn't!
Mister Sparkle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 06:41 PM   #14 
Terranariko
Member
 
Terranariko's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada,N.B
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Sparkle View Post
Ummm...no it isn't!
...ok now I'm confused...is it hard or not? D=
Terranariko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 06:42 PM   #15 
LolaQuigs
Member
 
LolaQuigs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: MO
If you're going to try cycling you don't need to do a water change until the end of the cycle. But such a small tank might not cycle. You could give it a try and see what happens, but just keep in mind that it might not work and could be a waste of time.

You will definitely need to do frequent water changes after you get the fish, and as long as you do that, an uncycled tank is fine. All cycling does is produce beneficial bacteria that help break down ammonia, but as long as you change your water often you shouldn't have a problem with ammonia. Cycling really just makes it so that you don't have to do water changes QUITE as often.
LolaQuigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 06:45 PM   #16 
Mister Sparkle
Member
 
Mister Sparkle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
No, a cycled aquarium means that your fish doesn't have to be exposed to building toxins while waiting for water changes. Cycling an aquarium isn't about saving on labor, but rather on maintaining ideal conditions for fish.
Mister Sparkle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 06:47 PM   #17 
Terranariko
Member
 
Terranariko's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada,N.B
Quote:
Originally Posted by LolaQuigs View Post
If you're going to try cycling you don't need to do a water change until the end of the cycle. But such a small tank might not cycle. You could give it a try and see what happens, but just keep in mind that it might not work and could be a waste of time.

You will definitely need to do frequent water changes after you get the fish, and as long as you do that, an uncycled tank is fine. All cycling does is produce beneficial bacteria that help break down ammonia, but as long as you change your water often you shouldn't have a problem with ammonia. Cycling really just makes it so that you don't have to do water changes QUITE as often.
Oh...I thought cycleing helps reduce the risk of "new tank" syndrom or whatever it's called...

unless beta's don't get that...but I'll be sure to do water changes...I should change only 1/4 of the tank right? or a bit more?
Terranariko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 07:56 PM   #18 
Mister Sparkle
Member
 
Mister Sparkle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
You can never do too much, really. A real and sufficient goal for ANY SIZE aquarium is to try to change out about 50% of the water per week. Personally, I do a 20% every other day, and my water is excellent!
Mister Sparkle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 07:59 PM   #19 
Terranariko
Member
 
Terranariko's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Canada,N.B
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Sparkle View Post
You can never do too much, really. A real and sufficient goal for ANY SIZE aquarium is to try to change out about 50% of the water per week. Personally, I do a 20% every other day, and my water is excellent!
So when I first get him I should change the water every day? since you have to do it more when you first get them?

so like 1/4 everyday for a while till he is settled then go to a normal thing of half every week?
Terranariko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 08:01 PM   #20 
Mister Sparkle
Member
 
Mister Sparkle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
That sounds like a good starting point. The best way to tell if that is working is to test the water to measure how high the ammonia is getting. If it gets up near 0.5 ppm, then you can change more of the water...like 50% daily.
Mister Sparkle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.