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Old 07-26-2014, 11:31 PM   #11 
hrutan
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Originally Posted by Waldobubbles3 View Post
What substrate should I use for simple, hard to kill plants? And does the snail type matter (I do know not to get the apple/mystery snails tho)? Thank you both for your answers they are really helping me!!! Sorry if all these questions are annoying :/
Some types of snails to consider:

Nerite snails: Beautiful shells, and don't breed in fresh water. Cleans your tank of algae. Ideal if you don't want to control a breeding snail population.

Ramshorn snails: Also very pretty, can come in stunning colors. Will breed like bunnies if you overfeed. Round shell that is curled like a ram's horn. Often considered a pest. Cleans your tank of algae.

Malaysian Trumpet snails: Spiral shell like a unicorn horn. They are nocturnal. During the day, they burrow, and they come out at night. Very, very fast breeders. Often considered a pest - once you have them, good luck getting rid of them. Cleans your tank & aerates your soil.

Mystery Snails: Beautiful. Can grow to be very huge. To be avoided in a small tank, but one would be just fine in a 10 gallon. Another cleanup crew snail, but also a heavy polluter.

Assassin snails: Breed slowly. Eat pest snails, among other things.
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Old 07-26-2014, 11:35 PM   #12 
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The assassins also will aerate your substrate. Just adding that, everything else is correct
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Old 07-26-2014, 11:38 PM   #13 
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Which is more effective cost and use wise: sand, gravel or soil? Will I need a fertilizer in all of these?

Last edited by Waldobubbles3; 07-26-2014 at 11:43 PM.
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Old 07-26-2014, 11:52 PM   #14 
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That depends entirely on what you plant. I found organic potting soil to be the cheapest, with a sand as a "cap" to keep everything pinned down ... but also the most work to set up, because you have to rinse the sand, and pick through the soil to pull out all the big woody bits, and then change and change and change the water after adding it to get all the stuff that floats out of the water.

Sand by itself is fine, but rinse the heck out of it first, or you'll be doing the same thing - changing and changing the water to get the cloudiness out.

Gravel is the easiest, you just rinse it, pull out any sharp bits, and put it in. It doesn't have any nutrients, but the easiest plants don't require much.

Whether you need fertilizer depends on the type of plants, and I am no expert about that.
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Old 07-27-2014, 12:04 AM   #15 
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I think I am going to go with no fertilizer and gravel and plants that can handle this. I'm reading up on planted tanks and the lighting is a very very big deal... Do I need special bulbs? With the lights fluctuating will the temp and hurt my fish?
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Old 07-27-2014, 12:09 AM   #16 
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My personal advice is to get a timer for your lights, so that you don't need to worry about when to turn them on and off. Set the timer for 9 or 10 hours. You can use a spare desk lamp or buy a cheap clamp on light from a hardware store and shine it on the surface of the water. You want CFL 6500k (daylight) bulbs.

The temp from the light is usually only at the surface, and won't matter in a 10 gallon tank.
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Old 07-27-2014, 12:23 AM   #17 
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Ok good. I researched and came up with these.
•Java moss
•African water fern
•Java fern
•Cryptocoryne lutea and wendetti
•Anubias
•hornwort
Is this a good variety? Too many for a ten gallon? How much would it be (plants alone)I believe they are easy enough.

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Old 07-27-2014, 01:01 AM   #18 
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As long as the fish have room to swim, you can't have too many plants! Bettas love having lots of places to hide. But that's a question that you'll want to ask over in the Planted Tank section. The kind folks over there can give you better advice.
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