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Old 10-13-2010, 09:41 AM   #1 
myfishjayne
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Question Meanie ghost-shrimp!

Hi, I don't know if this is bad enough to post here, but I am worried about Jayne. My ghost shrimp and trying to attack his tail! I have only seen this done once, just a few minutes ago. But the whole end of his tail is rather red-ish. I don't know if there us anything you can do, but if you can, Please do!!!

Housing
What size is your tank? 5 gal.
What temperature is your tank? about 75*F
Does your tank have a filter? Yes.
Does your tank have an air stone or other type of aeration? I don't know...
Is your tank heated? Yes!
What tank mates does your betta fish live with?
one(1) little snail and three(3) ghost shrimp (I do realize that my tank is fully stocked and can't add anything else).

Food
What type of food do you feed your betta fish? He has Hikari Betta Bio-Gold pellets(I give him 2-3 a meal) or a little bit of Tetra MettaMin flakes.
How often do you feed your betta fish? About twice a day. (I some times fast for a day).

Maintenance

How often do you perform a water change? I have only done one so far, I am going to start to do a 30(ish)% change every 15 days or so, more if needed.
What percentage of the water do you change when you perform a water change? about 30%
What type of additives do you add to the water when you perform a water change?
Betta bowl buddys, and I put in some EasyBalance for the pH (also from Tetra)

Water Parameters:
Have you tested your water? If so, what are the following parameters?

Ammonia: <0.02
Nitrite:N/A (gotta get something does that)
Nitrate:
pH:about 7/7.5 (a bit high, I know)
Hardness: no idea...
Alkalinity:
no idea

Symptoms and Treatment
How has your betta fish's appearance changed? The back end of his tail is redish like it has been bitten.
How has your betta fish's behavior changed? It hasn't. I just saw his tail.
When did you start noticing the symptoms? Just a few minutes ago.
Have you started treating your fish? If so, how?I do not know what is wrong and don't have any meds() so no.
Does your fish have any history of being ill?I just got him a few weeks ago, but no.
How old is your fish (approximately)?
I have no idea...

Last edited by myfishjayne; 10-13-2010 at 09:51 AM.
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:16 AM   #2 
Oldfishlady
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For some reason I can barely see your answers-but it looks like you make water changes every 15 days in a 5g filtered tank...right? if so... your fin problem is most likely related to water quality-especially if your tank is not cycled-(ammonia reading and no nitrate reading)
I would start by making a 50% water change now and daily for 3-4 days and if no improvement I would QT and start a 100% daily water change with aquarium salt 1tsp/gal for 10 days.
The ghost shrimp usually will not cause damage to healthy fish-a weak lethargic fish with damaged fin the ghost shrimp could hurt them-but usually the Betta can get away before any real damage is done...the shrimp is most likely responding to injured flesh/open wound bu not the cause.
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:24 AM   #3 
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Yes, I don't know about the ammonia(and that and the pH are the only thing I have meters for right now), only because I have a little thing that stays inside the tank, I have to get a kit to really tell me how much of everything is in the tank. I will try the water changes (50% every day for 3-4 days). I don't honestly think he is sick, or weak, as he has been healthy since the day I got him. But, me knowing almost nothing, I will do this. It isn't anything bad, his little 'wounds' just me being a novice and this, not even I want to make sure he is 999% before I gotta go on the trip (6 days away...)

Thanks for your help!
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:53 AM   #4 
Oldfishlady
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Redness in the fins can be a sign of infection/bacteria from injury and/or poor water quality being the most common causes, they usually will clear up pretty fast with just clean water from water changes-once the environment is fixed/improved the fish immune response will kick in and take care of it...it needs to be watched and you should see improvement in a couple of days with an already healthy fish.

Also, your pH is fine-I would not try and change this as most Bettas will adapt and be fine with your source water pH

Welcome to the wonderful world of Betta keeping......a great hobby...hope to see some pic of your new wet-pet and set-up....
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:54 AM   #5 
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Okay! Thank you so much! I will take some photos of him ASAP.
Though, my mom says it is nothing...

Last edited by myfishjayne; 10-13-2010 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:31 PM   #6 
Adastra
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If your five gallon tank hasn't undergone the nitrogen cycle, you should be doing one 100% change a week in order to remove all of the harmful ammonia building up in there. Fish constantly excrete ammonia through their gills--it's like their form of urine. Ammonia is a very toxic substance and it's a main ingredient in window cleaners and other products, so any readable amount is detrimental to your fish. In nature, ammonia is converted by beneficial bacteria into less harmful nitrate, consumed by plants, and diluted across larger quantities of water--without any of these components at work in your tank, you have to do frequent 100% changes.

Because your tank is filtered, you can cultivate beneficial bacteria in your filter media. In order to do this, you need to get a liquid master test kit. This way you know when and how much water to change in order to keep your fish safe, and the bacteria fed. I recommend getting your water tested at a local pet store or fish store--if you take a sample of water to them, they will test it for free. This will give us some idea of what stage of the nitrogen cycle your tank is. Ideally, when you're cycling a tank with fish and other inhabitants the water should be tested every day so that you can keep the ammonia and nitrite at a steady .25ppm until the bacteria colony is strong enough to convert everything into nitrate.

Even when your tank is fully cycled, you should do changes more frequently than every 15 days. I do 30-50% changes once a week. Having a routine is important--it will keep the tank stable and you won't forget to change the water if you get into the habit of doing it once a week.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:01 PM   #7 
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I wouldn't recommend doing 100% water changes on a cycling tank-this could disrupt/slow the process.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:03 PM   #8 
myfishjayne
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Yes, anyway, the ammonia is not the problem. The thingy in there says it is less then 0.02ppm so I know that is not the problem...

Last edited by myfishjayne; 10-13-2010 at 01:11 PM.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:27 PM   #9 
Adastra
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfishlady View Post
I wouldn't recommend doing 100% water changes on a cycling tank-this could disrupt/slow the process.
Just making the point that whether the tank is cycled or not will make a huge difference maintenance-wise. Perhaps it was not worded explicitly enough. As you and I both know, not everyone understands how to control ammonia in a tank when they're first starting out--uncycled, mid-cycle, or cycled.

As for the ammonia indicator in your tank--they are often quite inaccurate. If it says ammonia is present in your tank, you can expect that there's a higher quantity than the meter is reading. Nitrite is just as toxic as ammonia, and you may be at the phase of your cycle where nitrite is spiking much higher than ammonia. It would be prudent to do a partial water change as OFL suggested and take a sample of the old water to a pet store to have it tested.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:30 PM   #10 
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Okay, it is an odd thingy, it is called: AlertCombo(Continuous freshwater pH & Ammonia readings) it is by... Seachem...
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