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Old 10-29-2010, 11:09 AM   #1 
dampsugar
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water changes

I had a question about water changes. My tank has been cycling for 4 days now. I have a 10 gallon tank. I've changed 2 gallons of water daily. My question is:

Is a 2 gallon water change daily sufficient? Or do I want to do all the water? (this doesn't seem beneficial to me because the bacteria would not have time to colonize) Or would I do less than 2 gallons daily? What do you recommend?
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Old 10-29-2010, 01:22 PM   #2 
Oldfishlady
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Are you cycling with or without fish?
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Old 10-29-2010, 01:51 PM   #3 
Adastra
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You need to get a liquid test kit like this one: http://www.fosterandsmithaquatics.co...54&pcatid=4454

This is the only way you can tell with certainty when and how much you need to change. Your goal during the cycling process will be to keep the ammonia and/or nitrite at or below .25 ppm if you are cycling with fish in. The readings you get will ultimately tell you when the cycle is completed.
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:08 PM   #4 
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i'm cycling with one male crowntail betta.
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:27 PM   #5 
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Oh, and just so that you know, large water changes don't affect bacteria growth tremendously. Think of it like algae that doesn't need light to grow--it clings to the porous surfaces in the tank and the overwhelming majority of it lives in the filter. When you change your water, almost all of the bacteria will remain where it is because very little of it is actually floating around in the water, so don't be afraid to do big water changes if you get a high ammonia/nitrite reading.

You don't want to change too much if you're not testing regularly--although you won't know what's too much and what's not enough if you don't test it, lol. After all, there has to be some ammonia and/or nitrite in there for the bacteria to feed off of and grow or else it will starve to death.
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:39 PM   #6 
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In a 10gal filtered tank without testing products-cycling with one Betta-I would make at least twice weekly 50% water changes-one of the twice weekly to include gravel vacuuming/substrate cleaning and one water only- for at least 4-8 weeks and then one weekly 50% with vacuum to maintain water quality after cycle is complete.

With testing products-make once weekly 50% water change with vacuuming and 50% water only with any reading of ammonia/nitrite 0.25ppm or greater...once you have reading of nitrate 5-10ppm and 0ppm on ammonia/nitrite for several days without water changes you are most likely cycled
I would continue to monitor the water prams and make the needed water only changes per the reading until the tank matures between the regular weekly water changes.

Don't over feed and remove any uneaten food after feeding, keep the water temp within a couple of degrees from new and old water with water changes and use dechlorinator with any new water added to the tank if on city water supple

Give your filter media a swish/rinse in old tank water with a water change 1-2 times a month and when the water flow slow to get the big pieces of gunk off to maintain good water flow.

Look forward to seeing pics......
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:48 PM   #7 
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I tested my water today and the mercury/nitrite reading was .25 ppm and pH was 7.0 leaning towards 6.8.

Is both these readings good? More worried about pH reading since everyone has been saying to keep the mercury/nitrite reading .25 ppm or lower.
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:51 PM   #8 
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Everything sounds good to me, just maintain that level and you should be fine. Don't worry about pH unless it's fluctuating wildly--as long as the pH is stable the fish will adapt to it. Bettas are a soft water species, so 6.8 is a pretty good reading, really.
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Old 10-29-2010, 03:39 PM   #9 
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ok....great news. Thanks for all the information. I've learned alot in 2 days.
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