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Old 11-11-2010, 12:25 PM   #11 
MrVampire181
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From what I can tell he dosen't have it. BUT treat him anyway to be sure.
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Old 11-11-2010, 12:43 PM   #12 
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I don't think that's fin rot. It looks like your fish's fins are beginning to clamp. First thing I would do is to warm the tank up. You also need to try getting some more foods. Bettas need a varied diet and BettaMin flakes aren't a very good quality food.

What methods are you using to test your water? Testing strips are generally quite inaccurate, a liquid test kit is much better.

If your pH and hardness is as high as your readings say its likely that his fins are curling. Try to find some dried oak leaves or Indian almond leaf to help soften the water and lower the pH a bit.
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Old 11-11-2010, 12:46 PM   #13 
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Sorry, I haven't been posting much in D&E lately.

From the pictures, it looks like the fish has some ammonia burns--they tend to show up as blackish/grayish discoloration on the body and fins. The most common manifestation of fin rot is when the delicate edges of the fin begin to deteriorate as ammonia in the tank burns them away--the wounds left behind become infected and turn black and fuzzy or crusty. Your fish doesn't necessarily have the "textbook" fin rot, but there's definitely ammonia burns on the edges as well as the body of the fin.

No medication is necessary, all the fish needs to recover is warm, clean water and a high protein diet that will help him rebuild healthy fin tissue faster. Supplementing with extra frozen foods like bloodworms and daphnia is ideal while your fish is healing.

Unfortunately in a 1G tank, cycling just isn't going to happen. Bacteria need aeration to survive, or they will drown. This is why the bulk of bacteria live inside a filter. In a 1G tank, there are not enough surfaces for the bacteria to colonize and there is so little water that the small population of bacteria will be overwhelmed and unable to process all of your fish's waste. It will be unstable to the point that it isn't really worth trying. I find it easiest to cycle filtered tanks that are at least 3 gallons or larger.

Instead, you have to do more frequent 100% water changes. A tank of this size really needs a 100% change every other day to stay ammonia-free. Live plants will help you maintain low levels of ammonia, so with their help, you could feasibly make every other water change only a 50%.

I highly recommend upgrading to a larger container--it will be much easier to maintain, better for the health of your fish, and way more practical to heat. Mini-heaters and heater pads are low quality junk. They won't keep the temperature stable and will overheat or underheat the water based on the ambient temperature of the room. Most quality adjustable heaters are designed for use in containers that are a minimum of 2 gallons in volume--for that reason, we see 2 gallons as the bare minimum tank size for a betta. Unless you have a dedicated 80 degree fish room, a 1G tank is just not practical.

Last edited by Adastra; 11-11-2010 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 11-11-2010, 02:30 PM   #14 
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So this isn't finrot? This almost matches my betta's condition to the letter. Only thing is my betta is in a cycled, filtered tank that has frequently monitored ammonia (always 0ppm). He hasn't been exposed to ammonia higher than 3.0ppm for 1 day in June. The rest of his life after that was much less than .5ppm. He has had this look on his fins ever since august (back when he lived in a bowl).

It also has a good heater. Even when our room was freezing cold* (*Texas standards, approx. 50*F) the tempreture only dropped one degree (steady 76 dropped 75 and rose back to 76).

I do frequent water changes more than once a week. Are you saying this is caused by ammonia and tempreture? He has a very high (but not too high) amount of protiens and carbs. I make sure that his water is beautiful and the Nitrates don't ever rise above 20ppm.

I am sorry to post this question on Iziezi's thread, but the two cases seem very closely related.
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Old 11-11-2010, 03:17 PM   #15 
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I suggest making your own thread and filling out the form listed at the top of the forum. You may see similar symptoms, but they might have very different causes. In many cases, the condition of the fish's fins are a representation of the fish's overall health, so there might be another underlying condition that is causing this in your fish. Filling out the form in your own thread and posting a picture of your fish would be the best way to get advice.
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Old 11-11-2010, 03:24 PM   #16 
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Thanks Adastra. Sorry for the interuption.

This is a strange time for this but...
...This is my 200th post! Yay! (sorry I always post milestones)

Last edited by small fry; 11-11-2010 at 03:27 PM.
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Old 11-11-2010, 04:50 PM   #17 
Iziezi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by small fry View Post
So this isn't finrot? This almost matches my betta's condition to the letter. Only thing is my betta is in a cycled, filtered tank that has frequently monitored ammonia (always 0ppm). He hasn't been exposed to ammonia higher than 3.0ppm for 1 day in June. The rest of his life after that was much less than .5ppm. He has had this look on his fins ever since august (back when he lived in a bowl).

It also has a good heater. Even when our room was freezing cold* (*Texas standards, approx. 50*F) the tempreture only dropped one degree (steady 76 dropped 75 and rose back to 76).

I do frequent water changes more than once a week. Are you saying this is caused by ammonia and tempreture? He has a very high (but not too high) amount of protiens and carbs. I make sure that his water is beautiful and the Nitrates don't ever rise above 20ppm.

I am sorry to post this question on Iziezi's thread, but the two cases seem very closely related.
Hi SmallFry: I don't mind at all, as you said your Betta's condition appears very similar to my own. I'm very much a fan of "let's all put our heads and similar experiences together to figure this out."

Thanks also to MrVampire, 1fish2fish, and Adastra for advice. I'm going to the fish store again today to get better food for Dobby, and I'll look for a liquid water testing kit, and water softeners. (BTW, what is the ideal hardness range for a Betta?) I also think I'll stop at the drugstore to see if I can find a waterproof heating pad that I can put under Dobby's jar. (I read that on another thread, sounds like a great idea to me, Dobby will have more room to swim.

Here's something interesting. I just tested the tap water, straight up without any of the additional additives. The readings are exactly the same as the water from Dobby's jar, except Nitrite is 0. What conclusions can we draw from that?

Also, I thought Nitrate was good for Bettas, and it was something we wanted to have in the water?
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Old 11-11-2010, 05:00 PM   #18 
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Nitrates are not somethimg you want. They are safe for bettas and other fish at levels under 20 ppm but ideally you want to be as close to 0ppm as possible.
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Old 11-11-2010, 05:48 PM   #19 
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i keep all my bettas in a gallon tank, the standard size use for competitions. i just regularly change my water. since i started using this kind of tank, i never had problems with any disease. my bettas had fin rot when they were in a divided 10 gal tank.

i think you just need to change your water regularly, preferably every other day. feed your betta with a variety of food. try attison betta pro. and have him do his flaring exercise regularly.
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Old 11-11-2010, 05:58 PM   #20 
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I could be wrong, but I think it could be from the water hardess.
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