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Old 01-01-2011, 06:58 AM   #21 
HarleyRigid
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I think that should be fine Baylee, I believe the filter only needs to be running so that the bacteria are introduced and can build up in there as that is where a majority will live and work. Also as a side note... when changing filter cartridges etc I have read to only change 1 type at a time. Eg. Change your noodles only, wait a few weeks then change carbon cartridge and so on. If you change all at once you devastate your bacteria colony and will basically need to cycle again.
Baylee, you are also using the shrimp method... is your water a bit smelly?
Other members... is it normal for the water to get a bit smelly while doing the shrimp cycle?
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Old 01-01-2011, 02:31 PM   #22 
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Yes it's smelly. I removed my shrimp once the ammonia got high, and until the bateria start forming I'm leaving it out Lol. This filter is a biowheel, so I only need to change cartidges. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 01-02-2011, 03:10 AM   #23 
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Okay I really want someone to answer these questions!

1. Sand Questions. With the sand bed... If I get 9-11 pygmy cories (Yay! They're so small you can get many!) will they shift the sand bed enough with their barbles to keep algae off (I have EXTREME lighting)? And what type of sand is heavy enough that it doesn't float around constantly and get stuck in the filter but looks really awesome? Something like this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xkd12eyyo6M *Note: I ENVY this tank soooooooooo much. It's what got me into the idea of a community with cories and a white sand bed....

And this wierd brown stuff forms in my dads sand that's supposedly harmless, but it's from the tap water and annoying, it's kinda like brown algae (but it isn't). (I'm in Hawaii if that helps) If anyone knows what I'm talking about Lol how do I keep it from taking over my sand bed? And how do I clean the sand before I put it in the tank?

2. Cycling Questions. I've probably had my cycle going for a week. The ammonia is at roughly 6 PPM, but there's still no nitrites. How long does it take on average for the bacteria to start forming in a tank that's using the shrimp method and isn't being seeded?

It's getting a bit annoying that every time I test the nitrites my dad calls out "You need to introduce the bacteria! It wont naturally form!" And then I have to tell him "Yea, it will. It just takes several weeks."

So can someone answer the questions? Particularly the sand ones...?
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Old 01-02-2011, 06:01 AM   #24 
sayurasem
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for the sand... i can help you with that.
having white sand does makes your tanks soo much better... in exeption that you have fluorescent light or the 50/50 mini compact fluorescent light bulb.

-i used to use cheap incascedent light bulbs on my tank with the white sand and it looks fugly. (the light is yellow and the sand looks brown) now i use white colored light and the tank look amazing.

-too keep off algea on your sand is to put your finger at the bottom edge of your tank and digg around the perimeter of the tank.

-btw from my experience cleaning my tank, the sand will turn *hard solid* when water are added. (the pressure of 10 gallon water compressing the sand at the bottom... that been said cories does not really help to keep off air pocket in the sand bed. (i use 10lb. of marine sand for my 10 gallon)

-what kind of sand is good??... i think any brand name marine white sand is good. (NOT live sand).

-tip for adding water is good if you have hoes/siphon to pour in the *treated* water in your tank so it does not clod the water.... or if you are using bucket to pour in the water hard like water fall... i prefer to use bowl/plate ontop your sand so it will not cloud the tank.
--- remember..... your tank will always be cloudy for every 50% or more of water changes. dont freak out... water will clear out within 3/4 hours after water change. and make sure your filter is not too strong. baffle your filter or sand particle will fly around in the tank.
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Old 01-02-2011, 11:04 PM   #25 
baylee767
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I'm not doing a sand bed any more because I want to do a sorority again!

But seriously, can someone tell me how long it takes on average for the nitrites to start forming?
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Old 01-03-2011, 10:21 AM   #26 
bettasforsale
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LOL! Good idea! I think I'll refer to this thread too for more info. Thanks everyone! ;)
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Old 01-04-2011, 11:11 PM   #27 
dramaqueen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baylee767 View Post
I'm not doing a sand bed any more because I want to do a sorority again!

But seriously, can someone tell me how long it takes on average for the nitrites to start forming?
About 2-4 weeks from what I read.
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Old 01-05-2011, 05:38 PM   #28 
CatherineMPLS
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Quote:
1. Sand Questions. With the sand bed... If I get 9-11 pygmy cories (Yay! They're so small you can get many!) will they shift the sand bed enough with their barbles to keep algae off (I have EXTREME lighting)? And what type of sand is heavy enough that it doesn't float around constantly and get stuck in the filter but looks really awesome? Something like this...
Cories are omnivores. They need sinking carnivore pellets for food. Yes, they do eat some plant matter, but not a signicant amount. They do dig quite a bit in the sand though. There are many types of sand out there... that's a whole other topic in itself.

I used flourite black sand in part of my 55 gallon tank and my 10 loxozonus cories have no problems digging around :) It looks AMAZING but you have to RINSE IT VERY WELL before use! And no, it didn't turn hard with the pressure of the water....

TO RINSE:
Put the sand in a bucket (about 1/3 full). Fill the rest with water. Swish it around, pour out the cloudy water. REPEAT until the water is crystal clear when swishing the sand around :)



Quote:
2. Cycling Questions. I've probably had my cycle going for a week. The ammonia is at roughly 6 PPM, but there's still no nitrites. How long does it take on average for the bacteria to start forming in a tank that's using the shrimp method and isn't being seeded?

It's getting a bit annoying that every time I test the nitrites my dad calls out "You need to introduce the bacteria! It wont naturally form!" And then I have to tell him "Yea, it will. It just takes several weeks."
IT WILL NATURALLY COME!!! AND IT CAN TAKE SEVERAL WEEKS

There are 2 different bacteria colonies involved in the nitrogen cycle. These bacteria -- along with MANY others -- are present in the air and will naturally come into your tank to feed on what they want > ammonia and nitrite.

Some stores sell "bottled bacteria" but this stuff is SOOO hit and miss. Maybe this is what your dad is referring to? I personally would NOT recommend it to anyone.


So...The first bacteria (Nitrosomonas) converts ammonia to nitrite and is reddish in color. I would recommend cranking the heat above 80'F... maybe even 84'F as the bacteria multiply faster at higher temps. Also, the bacteria don't need light, but they DO need dissolved oxygen and lots of it. You could lower the water level in the tank so the filter creates more surface agitation -- and if you have one, crank the air pump/stone to high and move it near your filter's intake.

The second bacteria (Nitrobacter) will start to form once there is sufficient nitrite to feed on and convert it to nitrate -- and is brownish in color. Same applies to this bacteria for temp and O2.

Each of these bacteria take nearly 20 hours to double their population, so as far as bacteria go... they are VERY SLOW GROWERS. They also prefer a pH above 7.5 and will not grow well (if at all) with a pH below 6.5


Hang in there... if you feed them (ammonia)... they will come!

Last edited by CatherineMPLS; 01-05-2011 at 05:45 PM.
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Old 01-05-2011, 05:40 PM   #29 
CatherineMPLS
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Oh, and not that I probably need to tell you this :) but, drop the temp back down before adding any fish :)

GOOD LUCK!
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Old 01-05-2011, 05:47 PM   #30 
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That brown stuff your Dad had in his tank is probably diatoms. They happen in new tanks, when you have excessive nitrate, when your light needs to be replaced and sometimes they are caused by something in your tap water (phosphates I think). In my case, I must have phosphates because I have diatoms constantly. To remedy this, I have pond snails in all my tanks. They eat diatoms. But anyway, in the beginning of a tank, it's a normal thing.
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