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Old 01-31-2011, 07:54 AM   #1 
reaper0325
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Isolation: The key to success

Do you agree that isolating bettas (not even letting them see other fish) for at least a week increases possibility for a successful spawn?
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Old 01-31-2011, 02:06 PM   #2 
indjo
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Isolating bettas will at minimum increase their self esteem. Stressed individuals will to a certain level flare again - thus not hide as soon as they see another betta. This isolation method is specially effective for stressed or reluctant females. It is unnecessary for healthy and aggressive individuals.

Reluctant males should be flared longer than usual to induce it to spawn/build a bubble nest - specially highly aggressive males.
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Old 01-31-2011, 07:04 PM   #3 
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Originally Posted by indjo View Post
Isolating bettas will at minimum increase their self esteem. Stressed individuals will to a certain level flare again - thus not hide as soon as they see another betta. This isolation method is specially effective for stressed or reluctant females. It is unnecessary for healthy and aggressive individuals.

Reluctant males should be flared longer than usual to induce it to spawn/build a bubble nest - specially highly aggressive males.
At first I never let my bettas see each others, and they were always ready for spawning. Now that i have plenty of them, I just place them side by side in their jars. And it seems they don't want to breed anymore.
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Old 01-31-2011, 09:49 PM   #4 
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That is a very interesting question. I'm interested in what everyone has to say about it.
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:43 PM   #5 
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My males are always ready to breed, its my females that have the problem. They rather eat then breed and its so frustrating.
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Old 02-01-2011, 01:13 AM   #6 
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My males are always ready to breed, its my females that have the problem. They rather eat then breed and its so frustrating.
Same as my females. They're full of eggs, they have stripes, enter the male and they just spend the entire time hiding. Right now i am isolating all of them. I'll post what happens.
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Old 02-01-2011, 03:13 AM   #7 
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Males should not be allowed to constantly see other betta in close range (tank next to each other). Sooner or later they will either loose interest and become.... lazy(?) or become stressed. IMO bettas that doesn't move much is vulnerable to diseases. AND it will be reluctant to spawn.

Males kept in solitary have more self confidence and will always be interested in other bettas, thus easier to spawn.

Females almost always carry eggs. Even small/young females may carry eggs, though they're not ready to spawn. When these females are kept in solitary, they often show breeding stripes. But when placed together with a male, they run. The key is to understand when an individual female is ready to spawn. Common signs are often discussed so I wont get into that. It makes them more interesting - sometimes very thin looking females would almost immediately spawn while the fat/full of eggs wouldn't.
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Old 02-01-2011, 08:03 AM   #8 
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Complete isolation seems to increases aggression in both female and male bettas. Partial isolation where the male betta and female is allowed to flare at another betta of the same sex for around 10 minutes daily makes them get really excited to breed when they finally see a betta of the opposite sex....after not seeing another betta for about a week. It is totally normal for the female to play hide and seek and tag with the male in the breeding tank. It is a normal part of their courting process.
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Old 02-02-2011, 06:38 AM   #9 
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I have tried isolation for less than a week and all of my fishes are flaring again. I'll let them flare with each other for less than a minute each day from now on. I hope this solves my breeding problem.
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Old 02-03-2011, 04:33 PM   #10 
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ah man this thread helped me out so much. the hide and seek part really scares me though because my male was way too aggressive when he "found" her. but im keeping them seperate for now until i do way more research.
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