Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-23-2011, 07:05 PM   #1 
tumtum
New Member
 
tumtum's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Somewhere in Missouri
Live Plants

Hey, I keep hearing about live plants in Betta's tanks, but have never really considered it myself. I was wondering what the benefits are, do they help with fish waste?What types are there? And also are they hard to care for?

Thanks for the help
tumtum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 07:14 PM   #2 
ireland
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North Carolina
This is a bit of an "over kill", but I keep my betta, Silfire, in this 10 gallon planted. Its a little above a "low tech" setup, but still nothing on the high end.

Live plants helps in many ways, for one its more natural looking, and second it helps with fish waste. Fish waste equals Ammonia and then the Nitrifying bacteria turns it to Nitrite and then Nitrate. Plants then takes that Nitrate and use it as food to undergo photosynthesis giving off oxygen. Fish breaths oxygen, though betta has a labyrinth organ allowing them to take it from the air it also helps if there's oxygen in the water column. Bottom line is, it creates a more natural eco-system so the fish waste wouldn't build up so quickly causing health issues to your pets.

These shots are actually a few months old, now the tank is a jungle.


ireland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 07:36 PM   #3 
BlueHaven
Member
 
BlueHaven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: John 14:2-4
Wow that's a pretty setup!
I guess I don't need to say anything, lol
:)

I have plants too, they are fun to keep with your bettas, and you can find quite a few that aren't very hard to take care of if you want.
BlueHaven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 07:38 PM   #4 
ireland
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North Carolina
As for types, if you mean the scientific family name and genius then I have little knowledge here because, though I do know a good amount, I don't have all the scientific plant names out there embedded into my brain, but if you mean light wise they are categorized into three:

Low light
Mid light
High light

Low light plants are the most easy to care for and requires little attention, little to no light beside room and/or indirect sun light. CO2 is not needed, but it would help. A lot of aquarist like to use these because well they're usually cheap and gets the job done without the owner doing anything to it.

Mid light plants needs a bit more attention, but still pretty easy to care for. They require at least a non incandescent light fixture and depending on the plant you might need to dose some aquarium fertilizer. CO2 injection, depending on the setup, is usually needed.

High light plants needs the most attention and care. They usually require a good high end light fixture (usually), a weekly schedule fertilizer dosing, and CO2 injection, either DIY or pressure. These plants usually can only survive and thrive in a "high tech" setup (high end lights, EI dosing, CO2, etc.), but I have heard that if you keep an adequate level of CO2, dosing a weekly schedule, and have low/mid light you can pull it off.

CO2 Injection is not always required, but it would always help. Another way to inject CO2 without going DIY or pressurized is dosing Seachem Flourish Excel.

And no they are very easy to care for if you know what your doing.

Last edited by ireland; 04-24-2011 at 07:42 PM.
ireland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 07:39 PM   #5 
ireland
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North Carolina
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueHaven View Post
Wow that's a pretty setup!
I guess I don't need to say anything, lol
:)
Thank you BlueHaven :)
ireland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 07:56 PM   #6 
celine18
Member
 
celine18's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: North Carolina
omg, ireland, that's a BEAUTIFUL tank!!! just had to point that out. my 10 gal is soooo jealous!

yea, plants are very easy, just do a little research for low light plants (which is what you'll want to start with, they're the easiest), their care needs, and pick out which ones you like!

i suggest anubias, crypts, mosses, java fern, wisteria, watersprite, and floaters (duckweed, frogbit, etc) they're all easy to care for, just look up how to properly place them in the substrate/tied onto something.

live plants make wonderful additions to fish tanks!! you won't regret adding them!
celine18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2011, 08:27 PM   #7 
ireland
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North Carolina
Quote:
Originally Posted by celine18 View Post
omg, ireland, that's a BEAUTIFUL tank!!! just had to point that out. my 10 gal is soooo jealous!
Lol thank you celine18, I've been wanting to put in some carpeting plants to give off that grass feel to it, but haven't quite decide on which one yet

Quote:
Originally Posted by celine18 View Post
i suggest anubias, crypts, mosses, java fern, wisteria, watersprite, and floaters (duckweed, frogbit, etc) they're all easy to care for, just look up how to properly place them in the substrate/tied onto something.

live plants make wonderful additions to fish tanks!! you won't regret adding them!
Those are the exact plants I have in there, besides the watersprite, which is a good plant too, but I just couldnt find room for it, downside of planting a 10 gallon.
ireland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2011, 03:27 PM   #8 
tumtum
New Member
 
tumtum's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Somewhere in Missouri
Thanks for all the info! Does the tank have to be cycled for the plants to live or be beneficial? And how do you remove plants for waterchanges without killing them?
tumtum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2011, 04:50 PM   #9 
ireland
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: North Carolina
Quote:
Originally Posted by tumtum View Post
Thanks for all the info! Does the tank have to be cycled for the plants to live or be beneficial? And how do you remove plants for waterchanges without killing them?
No the tank doesn't necessary have to be cycled, but it is prefer/recommended that it is. No you do not have to take them during water change, just make sure not to uproot them if they are lodged or suck them up if they are free floating.
ireland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2011, 06:32 PM   #10 
tumtum
New Member
 
tumtum's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Somewhere in Missouri
Do they have to have a certain kind of soil or rock to be rooted in? And do you ever have to do 100% water changes in your 10 gal? I don't understand how you would clean your rocks if they were rooted.

Sorry for all the questions!
tumtum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
are fake plants alright or should i get live plants? jschristian44 Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 7 01-09-2011 09:34 PM
Can live plants go into a 2.5? Omega3 Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 10 01-09-2011 03:02 PM
Live Plants vs Fake Plants Phoxly Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 10 06-15-2010 11:53 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.