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Old 06-24-2011, 07:10 AM   #1 
Stanley
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A Little Help Please

New to this forum ... You know the story ... The Granddaughter got a Betta for being good after an injury. We now have a 10 gal tank, filter, and heater for the little fellow. Anyway, set the tan up yesterday and noticed tiny bubbles all over the glass sides, filter, heater and rocks. I wiped most the bubbles off the glass, with the net, but still have them on the rocks. Is there anything to be concerned about ? I haven't put Stanley in the tank yet. I raised Discus about 20 years ago and don't remember having these bubbles. Thanks for letting me be longwinded on my first post. Great Forum.
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Old 06-24-2011, 07:26 AM   #2 
SnowySurface
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Welcome. :)

I use plexiglass tanks, so the bubbles usually go away in a day or two for me. I'll wipe them away if it's really excessive, but they usually go away on their own. I'm not sure if glass tanks have more bubbles for a longer amount of time. Either way they should go away on their own. Since it's a new tank, it just has to settle for a bit. Now that my tanks are almost two years old, I almost never see those bubbles.
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Old 06-24-2011, 07:30 AM   #3 
Stanley
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Thank You, I didn't think they were a problem. Just didn't want to run to the store and replace a fish before the Granddaughter spotted it gone.
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Old 06-24-2011, 08:39 AM   #4 
Stanley
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Cycling ???? What is this? Where can I find more info on this subject? I haven't put Stanley in the tank yet. Thanks.
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Old 06-24-2011, 09:16 AM   #5 
kathstew
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Here's a link about cycling: http://www.bettafish.com/showthread.php?t=47838

Basically, its getting a cycle of good bacteria started. Ammonia is bad for our fish. Let the bacteria grow, and it turns the ammonia into nitrites(which is also bad) which is then turned to nitrates which isn't bad unless it gets too high. This allows you to do less water changes. Live plants also help this cycle alot because they absorb alot of the bad stuff. Read the link above for more information.
There are different ways to cycle a tank. Fish in or fishless. I cycled fish in. It takes about three weeks I believe. You do small partial water changes everyday on the tank for three weeks, so the beneficial bacteria has a chance to bloom.
Basically in a tank,you need a source of ammonia to get the cycle started. Fish release ammonia naturally. If you don't want to use the fish, there are other options like an uncooked shrimp left in the tank (it smells though), or pure ammonia (bought at the store), or fish food added.

This is another good link about cycling: http://www.aquahobby.com/articles/e_fishless.php
Good luck, and if you have more questions just ask! welcome to the forum by the way!
As the above said, the bubbles are nothing to worry about. They usually come when new water is added. I think (if I am remembering right) that the bubbles are just a lot of oxygen in the water. You can swipe it off, or let them dissipate on their own.
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Old 06-24-2011, 01:06 PM   #6 
Stanley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kathstew View Post
Here's a link about cycling: http://www.bettafish.com/showthread.php?t=47838

Basically, its getting a cycle of good bacteria started. Ammonia is bad for our fish. Let the bacteria grow, and it turns the ammonia into nitrites(which is also bad) which is then turned to nitrates which isn't bad unless it gets too high. This allows you to do less water changes. Live plants also help this cycle alot because they absorb alot of the bad stuff. Read the link above for more information.
There are different ways to cycle a tank. Fish in or fishless. I cycled fish in. It takes about three weeks I believe. You do small partial water changes everyday on the tank for three weeks, so the beneficial bacteria has a chance to bloom.
Basically in a tank,you need a source of ammonia to get the cycle started. Fish release ammonia naturally. If you don't want to use the fish, there are other options like an uncooked shrimp left in the tank (it smells though), or pure ammonia (bought at the store), or fish food added.

This is another good link about cycling: http://www.aquahobby.com/articles/e_fishless.php
Good luck, and if you have more questions just ask! welcome to the forum by the way!
As the above said, the bubbles are nothing to worry about. They usually come when new water is added. I think (if I am remembering right) that the bubbles are just a lot of oxygen in the water. You can swipe it off, or let them dissipate on their own.

Thank You very much ...
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Old 06-24-2011, 05:34 PM   #7 
Sakura8
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The gas bubbles tend to be a bigger problem with large water changes It's a huge pain but they do dissipate after about 24 hours. I find I don't have as much of a problem with them if I leave half an inch of water in the tank when doing "100%" water changes. But any time I fill a new tank, I have to let it sit overnight to get the bubbles out.
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Old 06-24-2011, 08:04 PM   #8 
Lion Mom
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If you have a sprayer attachment on your sink, use that to fill your new water bucket. It helps gas out the water faster & will result in fewer oxygen bubbles - which is all they are. :)

BTW, WELCOME to the forum!!!
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Old 06-25-2011, 07:42 AM   #9 
Stanley
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Thanks everyone for all the help ...
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Old 06-25-2011, 08:04 AM   #10 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lion Mom View Post
If you have a sprayer attachment on your sink, use that to fill your new water bucket. It helps gas out the water faster & will result in fewer oxygen bubbles - which is all they are. :)

BTW, WELCOME to the forum!!!
I didn't know that.. thanks for the tip!!
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