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Old 07-12-2011, 11:56 PM   #211 
laughing
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I haven't gotten a hold of anybody. I'm so sick of his treatment, he is the most amazing horse, and I feel in situations like this I'm helpless. In every other scenario he's "mine" and I've trained him, made him much more social, given him manners, and loved him, so to see him like this is heart breaking... I'd rather him go to a new home and me visit/help with him there than him stay like this!

No idea how long he's even had the abscess, or if anybody has even looked at it!! I don't know where the site is, either. It's so bad, though, he is totally bowlegged and barely able to walk. This tells me it must've been awhile.. If I don't see change before I see him next, I'm going to raise some caine and if they refuse, I will clear out his hooves, find the abscess, puncture it, soak it, and wrap it up my God **** self!! No animal deserves treatment like this!

Not to mention it's SUCH AN EASY FIX!! Just relieve the pus and soak it in some espom salt and keep it cleared... how hard is that?? It's not like a broken bone! If they'd give him a farrier worth half a crap then he wouldn't have had this problem in the first place!!!

I don't know why people were riding him, and I don't know if it was before the abscess or not. But he has some saddle sores, the skin is literally peeling in areas! No one informed me of him being ridden, he is NOT prepared to be ridden by any one else unless carefully instructed/monitored... They probably ruined him for me to start from scratch again!

I yelled and hollared today about how this is down right abuse, hopefully someone listens. I'm just nervous about him breaking out of his stall, eating all his neighbor's trash bin full of grain, then going and colicing without anybody checking in on him and I'll find him dead this weekend.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:11 AM   #212 
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Oh God, I hope not. Colic is a horrible way to go for a horse. :( I hope someone listens to you. It really is an awful feeling not being able to help a creature in need, especially a creature that is in every word but legal, yours. I went through similar situations with the paint mare I worked with.

I agree with you. It's a hard pill to swallow to let him go but it doesn't sound like he is meant to be a schooling horse. And certainly if he is being abused/neglected, he needs a new home and fast. With luck, you will be able to monitor the entire sale process and have a say in who buys him.

If no one does anything about the abscess, it's up to you. The last thing the poor guy needs is an infection. Best of luck, laughing, and don't give up.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:27 AM   #213 
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Ya know laughing, thats the first time I have ever seen someone mention Staffordshire Terriers!! People look at me weird when I tell them that's what my dog is... it got me into my rental though hahah Landlord didn't know that a Staffie looks like a pit, only smaller :)

BSL blows....

You would have loved my Rottie, Mason! I took him from an abusive home (he had a forked tongue, from them kicking under his chin to make him move. Cut the tip of his tongue off with his own teeth and many many scars). Sadly, my Mom's neighbor poisoned him on me in 2006, for being a child eating Monster (Rottweiler).

My Fate (Goobers) - Staffie

My Mason :(
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:35 AM   #214 
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Pitluvs, that's awful! Poor Mason. My neighbor across the street had an abused Rottie and he was a wonderful dog. Rotties just need firm training as puppies, that's all. They're no worse than Labs.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:35 AM   #215 
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I would HOPE and pray I could help choose his home, and preferably keep it close to where I live/stay so I can regularly see him and still visit/ride. He's a very special horse near and dear to me... I can take him on trails without a lead rope and he follows close, I'm his "herd". I haven't seen him in over a month, and 50 feet from his stall, his head shoots up, and he comes over to his railing and watches me come all the way up, and immediately rests his head on my shoulder. I know he missed me...

He needs chicken wire surrounding his stall so he stops kicking through the rail before he breaks a leg and won't rub his mane out stealing hay from his stall members, needs WAY less grain and higher quality hay (which is *finally* being recognized after I complained enough), needs the double lock, and needs better health treatment. I will fight tooth and nail for this.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:40 AM   #216 
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Yeah, laughing, he definitely doesn't sound like he's cut out to be a schooling horse. He sounds like a one-person horse and that person is you. Possibly because you're the only one who has bothered to try and understand him.
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:19 PM   #217 
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Originally Posted by Pitluvs View Post
Ya know laughing, thats the first time I have ever seen someone mention Staffordshire Terriers!! People look at me weird when I tell them that's what my dog is... it got me into my rental though hahah Landlord didn't know that a Staffie looks like a pit, only smaller :)

BSL blows....

You would have loved my Rottie, Mason! I took him from an abusive home (he had a forked tongue, from them kicking under his chin to make him move. Cut the tip of his tongue off with his own teeth and many many scars). Sadly, my Mom's neighbor poisoned him on me in 2006, for being a child eating Monster (Rottweiler).

My Fate (Goobers) - Staffie

My Mason :(
My heart just melted!! I used to love ABPTs, but Staffies are growing on me big time compared to them. I just love how small they are, but with the same goofy personality! They also are active little things, they're so funny to watch play!

I wish people knew the difference between American Pit Bull Terrier, Staffordshire Terrier, and American Staffordshire Terrier. And I wish they knew what these breeds are! A 'pit bull' is NOT some dog close to the ground with cropped ears and beefed up...

I am getting my Rottweiler puppy hopefully by next year. He will be used for agility, conformation, obedience/therapy, and schutzhund. :) Rotties are a breed you just can't help but smile at!

I hate the assumptions made about breeds specifically... Dogs should be treated as individuals! That's like saying one member of a family is a serial killer, so all of they're family members no matter how old or young should be killed on the spot, too.

Great Danes are my first, Rotties my second, and APBTs/Staffies my third! And they're probably the only breeds I will ever own, you just can't go back!
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Old 07-13-2011, 12:26 PM   #218 
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Yeah, laughing, he definitely doesn't sound like he's cut out to be a schooling horse. He sounds like a one-person horse and that person is you. Possibly because you're the only one who has bothered to try and understand him.
He is a great schooling horse, just not for this school because they seem to have issues not understanding proper care for an animal. Therefore I would rather see him go than him stay.. I would be so upset if I found him dead or with a broken leg one morning!

Another horse is 30 something and still going, but the beginners think because he's old they can do whatever they want to him and that he's permanently trained or something. So if one of us trains him well, they start yanking his mouth, kicking him in the saddle, do not keep proper position or anything making it hard on him, etc. So I told the leader of the program if he isn't treated the same as our 9 year old horse, and they refuse to respect him, he needs to retire in a nice pasture with someone who loves him and rides him respectfully a couple days a week.

Then 2 others have severe anxious/boredom habits that you can't ride them anymore. See what no turn out to pasture does?? They wont stop chewing (without food) or bobbing their heads, one has taken a point to kick/paw in his stall.

If better care doesn't come quick, I will report them and have their program shut down so these horses can live good lives.
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Old 07-14-2011, 12:53 PM   #219 
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Any horse over 30 probably should be just a pasture mate, not even ridden at all except by maybe a small child. Poor fellow. It's an endles cycle, too, because the more pulling on a horse's mouth, the more they develop "hard mouth" and the more inexperienced riders pull. A good rider doesn't need to use the reins very much, instead relying on the leg signals and voice signals. If you watch Olympic-class riders at work, you almost never see them move the reins except perhaps in the show jumping ring on those hard doubleback turns. It's all in the legs and the bond of trust between horse and rider. And when the reins are used, such as for stopping, it only needs to be a gentle, short tug. A well-trained horse and rider need nothing more.

It doesn't make sense that the school wouldn't turn out the horses. It's way more economical to keep them at pasture than to feed them grain every day. Plus, keeping them at pasture teaches students the extremely valuable lesson of how to catch an elusive horse. Yes, it may waste some riding time but it is all part of working with horses and every rider needs to know the tricks. My school did this and both student and horse benefited from it. I especially enjoyed the time I had walking my mount back to the pasture and telling her what a good job she did. It gave me extra time to bond with her and with my riding mates and instructor.

The two horses with cribbing/weaving/chewing problems will experience long-term health problems if they are not entertained sufficiently. There are toys you can purchase to help alleviate boredom in the stall but by far the best thing for these two would be turnout. But what is the point of a riding school having so many unrideable horses? That's very irresponsible.
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Old 07-14-2011, 09:09 PM   #220 
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Any horse over 30 probably should be just a pasture mate, not even ridden at all except by maybe a small child. Poor fellow. It's an endles cycle, too, because the more pulling on a horse's mouth, the more they develop "hard mouth" and the more inexperienced riders pull. A good rider doesn't need to use the reins very much, instead relying on the leg signals and voice signals. If you watch Olympic-class riders at work, you almost never see them move the reins except perhaps in the show jumping ring on those hard doubleback turns. It's all in the legs and the bond of trust between horse and rider. And when the reins are used, such as for stopping, it only needs to be a gentle, short tug. A well-trained horse and rider need nothing more.

It doesn't make sense that the school wouldn't turn out the horses. It's way more economical to keep them at pasture than to feed them grain every day. Plus, keeping them at pasture teaches students the extremely valuable lesson of how to catch an elusive horse. Yes, it may waste some riding time but it is all part of working with horses and every rider needs to know the tricks. My school did this and both student and horse benefited from it. I especially enjoyed the time I had walking my mount back to the pasture and telling her what a good job she did. It gave me extra time to bond with her and with my riding mates and instructor.

The two horses with cribbing/weaving/chewing problems will experience long-term health problems if they are not entertained sufficiently. There are toys you can purchase to help alleviate boredom in the stall but by far the best thing for these two would be turnout. But what is the point of a riding school having so many unrideable horses? That's very irresponsible.
+ The biggest number you can think of! I know all of that, I just wish THEY knew that!

The old horse is cleared to be ridden, he is in very good health/shape for his age. The woman I work for has a mare about his age, and she can barely walk, looks terrible, and will be euthanized soon probably. Him? I guessed he was early 20s! BUT, just because he's old, doesn't mean he deserves this treatment. He will still forget training and can become dangerous if not treated/ridden/handled properly. I'd rather see him in a little pasture, with a little friend, and a specific rider who loves him and respects him and he's only ridden a few times a week than have his mouth yanked on, sit in a stall, and no one treat him like a real horse.

They don't turn the horses out because there's no pasture where we board. I personally hate this place. I'm trying to start a program to build our own barn on site so they have better care and will have larger stalls plus a turn out area. It will probably be dirt turn-out, but at least a few hours of the day each one can be let out and enjoy some HORSE TIME! Not trapped in a stall, riden, put back.

I will probably treat the abscess myself on Saturday. A friend sent me a video of how to use diapers, rubber, and duct tape to make him a boot, and will send me a recipe better than espom salt which will draw it to the surface in a day or two, and then I will call up the vet to see if he can extract the infection so it can heal up.

I will bring a proposal for me to lease him, so he will be a school horse, but hopefully who rides him will be my descretion, and I can do whatever I want with him on my own time, too. I am also trying to put together a "mentorship program" so us more experienced students will teach the beginners so they'll know better. I am hoping to convince the school to sell the oldie, the 2 with anxiety behaviors, and our other horse not doing anything, then keep mine with me paying part of his expenses. Then bring in 2-3 other horses (I'd rather 2 we can fully pay for than get 4 more and have them make money issues!) that are fully trained, with professional trainer volunteers so there will be multiple trainers during sessions so no one can ruin these ones.

This year, I am kicking everyone's butts harder than last so these horses can finally leave good lives and our horse program doesn't fall apart!!!
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