Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-06-2011, 03:26 PM   #21 
Micho
Member
 
Micho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Canada
The test kits that are needed are: Ammonia, NitrIte, and NitrAte.

Doing a fish-in cycle is a pain in the butt, your fish will be your source of ammonia, test your water everyday for ammonia, and once in a few days for nitrIte. If either ammonia or nitrIte are above 0.25ppm do a water change.

You'll know when you're cycled, when you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrIte, and a number of nitrAte in between 10 ~ 40ppm. 20ppm being the best.

Test your water first, if it's above 0.25ppm for ammonia and nitrIte do a water change, acclimate your Bettas and put them into the tank, and then just watch ammonia/nitrite levels for the next few days. It took about two weeks for my tank to cycle. I was doing a fish-in silent cycle, so best of luck to you!
Micho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2011, 04:13 PM   #22 
crystalmylovee
New Member
 
crystalmylovee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Arizona
thank you so much!
crystalmylovee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2011, 12:06 PM   #23 
ANHEL123
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Philadelphia
There is another post about cycling . There is nothing wrong if you don't want to cycle. I have the same bettas for long time and i never cycled. I don't know how to do it. If you going to have 2 gall then you do 1-50% and 1-100% a week . I do 100% . There is a post on this forum about people disscusing this matter if you want you can read it. If you will go to my profile then go to the treat ''Can a tank without a filter cycle?''
ANHEL123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2011, 07:09 PM   #24 
Micho
Member
 
Micho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Canada
I would cycle anything above 5 gallons, anything under 5 gallons is quite impossible to cycle.
Micho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 02:21 PM   #25 
dramaqueen
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Central Texas
I agree with Micho. Anything over 5 gallons uncycled would be a pain to keep clean considering the fact that you'd have to do 1005 water changes.
dramaqueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 03:55 PM   #26 
SnowySurface
Member
 
SnowySurface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Bay Shore, NY
I wouldn't do the fish-in cycle if you have a hectic job. There are some days when I get in to work at 7:30AM but don't leave until 6PM. So, I can't keep up with the water changes needed during the ammonia spike stage. I wrapped up a raw shrimp in a stocking and let it rot for a few weeks. It could go on auto pilot since my fish where in 1 gallon tanks at the time. If you have the free time as a student or someone who works at home then fish-in cycling can be done without any harm to your fish. But I would suggest fishless cycling for anyone with a hectic job that could prevent them from keeping up with water changes.

I personally switched from a uncycled 1 gallon to a cycled 5 gallon because the 100% water changes really stressed out my fish. Now I never have to take them out of the tank to clean it so they are way more relaxed and their colors are bolder. Propably due to the end of the weekly stress fests they had to experience. Anhel123 is right about cycling being optional if you can keep up with the water changes. I just hated stressing out my fish 4 times a month so I did it to not only decrease the amount of water changes, but to help my fish be more relaxed. If a tank isn't cycled for the sake of the fish inside of it, then it's being cycled for the wrong reason, imo. If my fish didn't hate being displaced during 100% water changes so much, they would probably still be in uncycled 1 gallons. XD
SnowySurface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 12:23 PM   #27 
Thunderloon
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Gonna type this in here once and we're not going to argue about it.

Any volume of water allowed the time to colonize will start to cycle if ammonia oxygen and warmth are present. You can take a beaker of purified water and set it on a warming plate beside a litter box and simply circulate the water in it and it will absorb ammonia from the cat litter and begin to cycle if you leave it alone long enough.

Since the bacteria form on surfaces, if you don't sterilize all the surfaces, the bacteria will grow in number and colonize the container. Any amount of ammonia will start the process.

I commonly use Lee's/Tom's 5oz sponges to run as biological filters in even half gallon containers. They create the protective environment for the bacteria and you can even move them out of the bowl/vase/mini-bow into the container you move your fish to and STILL sterilize the main aquarium and all the little pieces in it. Then when you put your betta back in the reassembled tank you squish the sponge filter out several times using the changed water and then rinse with some prepared treated water and stick it back in the little aquarium. The bacteria survive just fine through all this and the sponge supports the cycle A-OK. There is no minimum water size to support a cycle.

The real connection comes with the Walstad method of planted tanks.

In Walstad you are making a natural environment and so you add fish to keep the plants alive. The plants are the bio-filtration for the tank. So in a tank with sufficient ratio of plants to fish a mechanical biological filtration plan isn't necessary to keep the fish alive unless your plants all die.

Water, Ammonia and Oxygen will produce a cycle unless it is sterilized. So stop spouting the "tank is too small" B.S., its wrong.

The only tank too small to cycle is one so small that there's no room for a fish.

Not addressing the nitrogen cycle is like claiming you don't have to wipe a baby's bottom because they get a bath every day. Your fish is soaking in it and its not natural, the tiny puddle is a healthier place - it's cycled.

Last edited by Thunderloon; 10-15-2011 at 12:31 PM.
Thunderloon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 12:52 PM   #28 
Thunderloon
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Nitrosomona and Nitrospira thriving conditions:
pH7.3 to pH8.2
Hardness between 80 and 140ppm
Alkalinity (linked to pH)
Temperature 79F to 84F
Aeration by filtration, surface agitation, air-stone or airflow.
Dark environment with a surface ready for colonization (inside filter).
ppm Ammonia not over 0.8
ppm Nitrite not over 0.7
ppm Nitrate not over 70
No medications, no household chemicals, no light of higher frequencies. (UV etc)

If your Nitrite is too high, the bacteria that eat Ammonia cannot poop.
If your Nitrate is too high, the bacteria that eat Nitrite cannot poop.
If your Hardness is too high, aeration suffers, excess iron (chipping stains in sink) is bad.
If your temperature is too low, life cycle time may not exceed growth rate.
If your Hardness is too low, the bacteria cannot form bodies nor bind to surface.

So the bacteria eat alkalinity, hardness, oxygen and energetic nitrogen compounds.
They have to have a medium to grow on (calcate deposits or equivalent bind point, thus why ceramic rings are used in canisters, aquaclear and why marineland (regent/aqua-tech) use expanded fiber media).
They have to be protected from light due to their chemical structure, it will generate energy from light which can retard growth or even simply cook the bacteria (UV has more energy per photon, but any bright bright light with short frequencies will sterilize the nitrospira and nitrosomona, its the amount of energy applied, not the frequency).
Thunderloon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 01:16 AM   #29 
crystalmylovee
New Member
 
crystalmylovee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Arizona
so i finally go test strips for ph, nitrite, nitrate, Carbonatte and General Hardness

My results-
ammonia: 0 ppm - 0.25 ppm
nitrate: 0 ppm
nitrite: 0 ppm
ph: 7.5 ppm
Carbonate Hardness: 80 ppm
General Hardness: 180 ppm

can i put them in?
crystalmylovee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2011, 03:03 AM   #30 
Hallyx
Reference Team
 
Hallyx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Fungus corners
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderloon View Post
They have to be protected from light due to their chemical structure, it will generate energy from light which can retard growth or even simply cook the bacteria (UV has more energy per photon, but any bright bright light with short frequencies will sterilize the nitrospira and nitrosomona, its the amount of energy applied, not the frequency).
From this might I infer that the lights I use to encourage my plants: 3W/gal at 6500K (which is high in short-frequency blue) can actually discourage my cycle?

Is this the reason (I remember reading) that cycled tanks and naturally planted tanks are contraindicated?
Hallyx is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Floaty butt? Punki Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 80 05-30-2011 09:14 PM
mr phinnyass the pain in the--- crezelda Betta Fish Care 4 02-04-2011 06:34 PM
Lazy Butt :] TayHudson Betta Pictures 8 11-20-2010 11:13 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.