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Old 05-25-2012, 10:11 PM   #251 
whatwhat
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Hello again, I have bad news ;( After trying for hours the poor adf died, I didn't even want the store to replace it because I didn't trust them. All of their fogs looked very skinny and sick, I don't know why I bought it there ;/
I was wondering if I should but it from my local aquarium store instead? They are very good and the frogs look healthier there. They also know what they are talking about unlike some stores -_- What should I look out for this time? I can't have what happened to my last frogs ever happen again ;(
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Old 05-26-2012, 08:59 AM   #252 
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Oh no! I'm so terribly sorry to hear that he didn't make it *hugs* At least you know that you tried your best to help him, and he was looking better and eating well toward the end. I'm sure he died happier than he was when you brought him home, and you should be happy for that, at least.

You bought him there because you didn't know any better, now that you do - I agree with your choice not to buy from them again. . . It seems unlikely that they are keeping healthy frogs there, though it may be that they came into the shop unwell from the breeder. If I were you I'd talk to the manager and ask some questions. It may be that they don't even realize that their frogs are in bad shape (though they should know better), and it can't hurt to try to get them to change their practices for the well-being of these beautiful creatures.

First and foremost, I would caution you to wait before buying another. You as of yet do not have a fully cycled tank. Frogs are very sensitive to toxins in their water, and it is never a good idea to put one into a cycling tank. You should also be sure to have your water testing kit in hand so that you can be certain that you are putting him into good conditions before ever bringing him home. It is possible to get a frog through the cycle and keep him healthy - I also got my frog before I knew anything about cycling - but it's hard to do, and not fair to put any creature through that mess. It is very likely that the stress I caused my creature(s) by my own ignorance will shorten their ultimate lives. Now that I know better, I will NEVER do it again.

If you look back at the first post on this thread, Gizmo has some good information up there. I'll put up a post on general signs and symptoms of illness in ADFs - to the best of my knowledge. It will be good to have on here, in the hopes it could help someone else as well. I'm still new at this, too - so hopefully others can add to it and we can have a nice comprehensive list of things people should look out for in keeping healthy froggies. . .

Again, I'm so sorry for your loss. . .
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Old 05-26-2012, 09:10 AM   #253 
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Illness in African Dwarf Frogs

Here is a kind of general list I've compiled of the signs and symptoms of sickness in African Dwarf Frogs. I hope that this is able to help someone out there, and that others add to it (or correct me if I'm wrong on anything), so that we can have a fairly comprehensive and easily accessible stockpile of information for anyone who is purchasing a new friend, or trying to treat an ill one. . .







Though it is normal for your ADF to float at the top of the tank for short periods of time, be wary if you notice him spending all of his time up there. If he is seen floating at the top of the tank continuously, this is a sign of difficulty breathing, illness, or poor water conditions. Other things to look for are faded colors or redness, listlessness, lack of appetite, cloudy eyes, bloated or swollen stomach, peeling or uneven skin shedding, and failure to flee and hide when startled or capture is attempted.

The first thing to do if you suspect your frog is sick is to test the levels of ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates in the tank. A WATER TESTING KIT IS NECESSARY if you are to keep these creatures. If you see any reading for ammonia or nitrites, or if your nitrates read above 30, do an emergency water change to get the levels down as quickly as possible. The amount of water to be changed varies depending on how high the levels are. You must be careful to do this as gently as possible, so as not to stress the frog out any more than you have to. Keep the hood lights turned off, as frogs prefer a dimly lit area, and this will help the frog remain calm. Once youíre sure that the toxins in the water are not the problem, watch to see how the frog reacts. It seems that in most cases, these sensitive creatures are reacting to dirty water, rather than an actual illness. Donít let it rest there Ė dirty water can lead to many severe problems and even death! Pay attention to the water in the tank, and always do a partial water change at least once a week Ė possibly more if your tank is small or unfiltered.

If your frog seems more floaty than normal and seems to be having trouble getting to the bottom of the tank, this is often a result of constipation, trapped air in their bellies, or over-eating. In these cases, fast the frog for a day or two and it should resolve itself. If the frog is very bloated, it is likely due to some sort of blockage in his intestinal tract from eating freeze-dried or pelleted foods, or from Dropsy. Iím not sure if thereís anything that can be done for a frog with Dropsy, though Iíve read that it can be possible to use a syringe to aspirate excess fluid from the stomach Ė I donít think thatís something Iíd be comfortable trying without an expertís help! Dropsy is caused by kidney failure, which is the end-result of a bacterial infection caused by poor water conditions. Let me repeat that Iím a novice frog-owner, and have not personally experienced any sickness yet (and hope never to have the chance!), so some of this information may not be quite accurate, so be sure to seek help if your frog is sick or injured!

If you notice that your frog has red on its underside or on its arms and legs, this is often caused by a bacterial infection called Red Leg, and should be treated with antibiotics, though it seems that even with treatment, the frogís chance of survival is slim. Again Ė please correct me if Iím in error here, as I have never had to deal with any of this first-hand, and the information here is being pooled from what I remember after having scoured various sources for information!

One more very important thing that needs to be mentioned before I stop going on about things that can kill your little frogs. . . this is a big, important, and fatal one that I highly recommend anyone considering owning (or who already owns) any frog become well-versed in. It is called the Chytrid Fungus. You may not realize it yet, but youíve probably already heard of this terrible disease on your local news. Chytrid is a very broad fungus category, the actual fungus strain that is affecting frogs was discovered in 1999, and named Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (referred to as BD). It is of major concern, because it has affected most of the worldís amphibian species and has had a devastating effect on frog populations (even unto extinction) the world over. A frog who has been exposed to BD develops a disease called Chytridiomycosis (Chytrid for short). Once infected, the fungus feeds on the Keratin that is inside the frogís top layer of skin. Without the Keratin, the frogís skin thickens. This makes it difficult for the frog to breathe through its skin, but even more devastating for ADFís (as they are able to take air from the surface) is the problem of electrolyte regulation. Frogs absorb and regulate the amount of electrolytes (like sodium and potassium) by passing them through their skin. As their skin thickens, they are left unable to manage the electrolytes. Internal build-ups of potassium will cause the frogís heart to stop beating, and so he will die. There are a few species of frog that seem unaffected by this virus, though the spores of the fungus are present on their skin. Most notably, African CLAWED frogs. Many fish and pet stores carry both ADF and ACFs. When this is the case, it is often found that the Dwarf population has been infected with spores from their Clawed neighbors. The spores of this fungus are tenacious, and spread very easily from tank to tank Ė even when one is absolutely aware of the risk and being cautious.

It can take up to 3 months for the fungus to kill. Symptoms of the Chytrid fungus include lethargy, lack of appetite, and rough flaking skin (often noticed during shedding), some frogs will try to climb out of the water or thrash at the top of the tank. There are some treatment options available for frogs that have this disease, and Iím doing quite a bit of research into this right now. I will post when I feel Iíve gained some further understanding of what can be done for these poor frogs! If you have had a healthy ADF for some time, and wish to add another to the group, please be sure to quarantine the new arrival in a separate tank for a period of 3 months to be certain that he does not infect any of your current frogs. During this time be very careful not to use the same buckets, nets, thermometers, gravel vacuums, etc. or in any way get water from the quarantined frogís tank into the healthy frogís tanks. This disease does NOT affect fish, but the spores of this fungus can live in the tank water for 3 months even without the frog present. Also be very careful when disposing of waste water from the tank of an infected frog (or one in quarantine). DO NOT POUR IT IN YOUR GARDEN, as you run the very real risk of spreading this deadly disease to your entire population of local frogs. It is recommended that you treat any waste water from an infected frogís tank with bleach for one hour before sending it down the drain.
Please donít let these dire-sounding warnings deter you from purchasing one of these amazing animals, but be wary when you go to the shop. Look at the frogs in the tank, judge their health, ask questions, donít purchase a frog from a tank in which you see evidence of sickness or death, and NEVER attempt to Ďrescueí a sick frog.

To ease your mind after all of that, I should note that the common consensus is that ADFs are fairly sturdy little creatures, and it takes a bit to make them sick. They seem to be most susceptible to bacterial infections and fungus. These conditions are usually brought about by stress caused by overcrowding and/or poor water conditions (with the obvious exception of Chytrid). If you take care to keep their water clean and clear of toxins, and be careful not to put to many in too small a space, they should do just fine! Still, itís always advisable to keep a close eye on any creatures you care for. An illness caught in its early stages is far more likely to be treatable than one left too long.


Hope that helps someone out there! Feel free to post more information up if you have it to share - or correct me if I'm wrong. I'm still a novice frog-keeper. . .
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Old 05-26-2012, 01:16 PM   #254 
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I dont have a test kit, but the people at persmart said that my tank was cycled. What test kit should i get for a 10 gallon fish tank? My other fish are healthy and doing fine, but ill get a test kit just incase i guess.
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Old 05-26-2012, 01:40 PM   #255 
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The best is API's Master Freshwater test kit. It'll cost around $30, but should last you a very long time. Do get one, and test your tank(s) on a regular basis - there is no other way to be sure of what the conditions of the water are without it. Relying on the fish (or frog) to let you know when things are bad is not the way to go, as it can often be too late for them by the time they show signs of poisoning from the toxins in their water.
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Old 05-26-2012, 10:07 PM   #256 
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I'm sorry - I replied to you thinking that you were someone else who has been having similar problems with her frog, though hers did start to eat, and I hope is doing okay now. She's the one who didn't have a cycled tank - Sorry I got the two of you mixed. . .

So yeah! Since your tank IS cycled, that changes things a bit, though it's still a really good idea to have that test kit in-hand - for your fish OR your frogs.

You know now to make sure they aren't looking very thin or pale. Don't buy from a tank that has a dead frog in it. . . if the frog doesn't run away when they try to catch it, that's a bad sign, and don't get one that's hanging out near the surface of the tank for too long. . .

The majority of 'illness' in these frogs is due to poor water conditions, it seems. . . so really, the only way to be sure it's healthy (especially if chytrid fungus is a problem) is to bring it home, keep the water clean, and keep a close eye on it for a few months. Chytrid can't harm your fish, nor can they be carriers for it - HOWEVER it can live in a tank that an infected frog has been in for a period of 3 months after the sick frog is gone - so if I were you I'd wait 3-4 months before buying another frog just to be sure - it would be so sad if you brought a healthy frog home and it got the sickness from spores your old frog left behind. Frogs with chytrid tend to stop eating toward the end, so it is possible - even likely - that your last frog(s) had it, and you'll want to be careful with the water from that tank for a few months until the spores die off. . .and yes. Absolutely under NO circumstances buy from the store where you got the others again. What a shame. . .

It's always a good idea to double-check with the shop and find out what they feed their frogs while they have them. That way you can get started on the right foot by offering it something it's already familiar with, and then try to switch it up as they get used to living with you. :) Good luck!
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Old 05-26-2012, 10:27 PM   #257 
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Frogger seems to be doing wonderfully now and eats every night and is active. Responds when startled, but he takes a bit to wake up if he's asleep
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Old 05-26-2012, 10:56 PM   #258 
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Originally Posted by JennybugJennifer View Post
Frogger seems to be doing wonderfully now and eats every night and is active. Responds when startled, but he takes a bit to wake up if he's asleep
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HOORAY for FROGGER!!! I'm so happy he's doing well!
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Old 05-26-2012, 10:58 PM   #259 
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Much better :) I'm very happy he is eating
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Old 05-27-2012, 11:22 PM   #260 
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He's a feisty little stinker now
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